My SVS 20-39PC+ Arrived Yesterday

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Robb Roy, Oct 26, 2002.

  1. Robb Roy

    Robb Roy Supporting Actor

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    This is my initial reaction: [​IMG]!!!
    After several hours of trying to get work done with my head jerking from my computer screen to my window every time a vehicle went by, my new SVS 20-39PC+ arrived! The UPS driver had trouble believing it was really a subwoofer. I had trouble believing I wasn’t a five year old on Christmas morning.
    This sub was to replace a Boston Acoustics PV1000 (I let WAF and how wonderful my VR-M90s sound have WAY too much influence in that decision). I always knew I was missing the really deep material in movies, so the first thing I wanted to do was put those port blockers in to tune the thing to 12 Hz. If it struggled calibrating to reference, taking one or both of them out would be easy enough (sort of -– Tom obviously doesn’t like things rattling on his subs, and the seal on the grill was proof of that). There was no need to worry! I made the mistake of starting the calibration with the old settings I had for the PV1000 -- I was frantically turning down the volume before this thing shook my house apart!
    So far I’ve only had the opportunity to sample various movies and music, but I did choose some of my more difficult material. Everything I threw at it, from low to loud, it handled in my room flawlessly. It had none of the “boomey,” loose bass I had become accustomed to, just tight, clean, and loud bass. I suppose that makes sense: Tom V. took a lot of time asking me about listening habits and looking over a picture of my floor plan in coming up with a recommendation for me. Most sales people ask more questions about my credit line than my room’s acoustics, so dealing with the folks at SVS was a pleasure right from the start.
    Quick soap box: I find it interesting that as my audio gear gets better, more of it’s made in America. SVS exemplifies how American business should be done: excellent products, excellent service, competitive prices, and honest concern and compassion for their consumers. End soap box.
    -Robb
     
  2. Dustin B

    Dustin B Producer

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    Don't tune it to 12hz. 16hz maybe, but twelve noooo [​IMG] Poor DB12 driver with only a single 3" port [​IMG]
     
  3. Robb Roy

    Robb Roy Supporting Actor

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    Dustin B.,

    Thanks. I am happy as could be with the sound, so I'll probably play with the different settings more as a matter of convenience than necessity.

    -Robb
     
  4. SVS-Ron

    SVS-Ron Screenwriter

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    Robb,

    Thanks for those kind words. As mentioned in e-mail too, adding that second port blocker is a bit of a compromise in terms of total SPL capability in the higher ranges of bass. It's the classic "no free lunch" scenario. You pick up a few dBs of ultra low bass SPL (for LFE/music tracks that have it to begin with), but sacrifice some higher, where bass is more common.

    Generally, we recommmend folks calibrate and situate the sub in its "stock" tune and give that some time. Gain familiarity on how it reacts to your favorite movies... then add a port block (make the subsonic filter switch on the amp too) recalibrate with the your trusty SPL meter (a MUST, there is no way to do this "by ear" ;^) and then redo some demos.

    If you are running high levels, then I'd guess one port block will be your limit. If you find more moderate levels of bass sufficient, then throttling the porting to one port (so, two port blockers then) might give you some satisfying deep bass you wouldn't otherwise get (though the number of movies that would provide LFE needed to realize this low a "tune" for your sub are few).

    As with all things in life, experimentation and simply taking the time (as you seem to be) to learn more about your room, and how your gear is interacting with the program material you generally run will allow the best exploitation of that gear.

    You can consider your sub a "fire and forget" device with minimal need to tweak, or (especially for Plus and Ultra SVSs) consider a wide range of settings that really make it YOUR sub, in YOUR room.

    Ron
     

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