My sealed DIY subwoofer project

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by GeorgeHolland, Jun 23, 2001.

  1. GeorgeHolland

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    I have just finished gluing the 1/4-inch oak veneer plywood and ¾ inch hardwood legs to my DIY North Leviathan subwoofer, designed by North Creek Music. It is a 4 cubic foot, down firing, sealed design. The driver is the 18" Leviathan, which is an OEM version of The Seismic Systems 8196E.
    I picked the Leviathan because I thought the cabinet design would lend itself to a relatively unobtrusive cube, that if I finish the way I plan, will look right at home in my living room or family room. It turned out a little bigger than I had imagined.
    I am using 1 inch solid oak as a top with 3/4 " oak for the legs. I hope to master my new router and if I can, put an Ogee edge that comes very close to matching my end tables. If the subwoofer doesn't look something like furniture, my wife will see it goes in the basement. As this is my first DIY attempt, I also wanted a proven design that was reasonably easy to build. For critical movie viewing I have a theater room in my basement with Infinity Preludes and a Velodyne FSR15. My idea is to put together a system upstairs primarily for two-channel stereo and some occasional movie viewing. I have tasted SACD with my Sony 9000, and plan on building the new North Creek Visions as soon as the kits are available. In fact I have already cut the wood for them. I picked up a Bryston 10B electronic crossover and for now will use a bridged Bryston 4BST as an amplifier. When I finish the Vision mains, I hope to pick up a 7B for the sub and use the 4B's on the Visions.
    I can take more pictures as my project progresses if there is any interest, but here are a couple to illustrate the bracing of the Leviathan box and the unfinished sub with the oak top ready for gluing. I still have some sanding to do. I welcome pointers on how to easily post pictures.
    http://y42.photos.yahoo.com/bc/georg...Photos&.view=t
    The ¼-inch oak veneer plywood, ¾-inch thick oak legs and 1-inch solid oak top make the sub even more rigid, not to mention very heavy. I am looking forward to finally hooking it up and hearing how it sounds.
    For cabinet plans and driver specs check out the North Creek Music web page.http://www.northcreekmusic.com
    George
     
  2. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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  3. Julian Data

    Julian Data Second Unit

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    Looks very impressive! [​IMG]
    I like the work very much. Keep us updated.
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  4. Brian Fellmeth

    Brian Fellmeth Supporting Actor

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    If your wife gives that the boot, she is one hard ass. Sure you want to risk taking the router to it ? Looks great as it is.
     
  5. Geoff L

    Geoff L Screenwriter

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    Hi George,
    Lotsa cuting and glueing going on there for sure. Looks just super.
    Keep the shots comeing as many will be curious of your sealed monster 18!
     
  6. Hank Frankenberg

    Hank Frankenberg Cinematographer

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    George, it looks very good. A different style than the normal cube. I like it and hope your wife accepts the finished sub [​IMG]
     
  7. Tim Brewers

    Tim Brewers Agent

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    Looks really nice. Just a couple tips for the routering. Don't take the whole cut in one swipe. I would take 3,4 or even 5 passes at it, slowly setting the bit deeper, till you get to the depth you want. Practice a little on another piece. Also make sure you route against the way the bit is spinning.
    Brew
     
  8. GeorgeHolland

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    Thanks for the routing tips Brew. Similar to the Routing book I picked up. I will definitely practice on some scrap before I try. The Vision mains will be even more of a challenge as they call for 1" round on the outside edges of the fascia. That will require quite a few passes I'm sure. I plan on using 1 1/2" solid oak for the front and top.
    Next I need to pick a stain, or I may choose to leave it natural. I am leaning toward Danish Oil with a Tung Oil finish coat. I am also considering a varnish finish coat over the Danish oil. Suggestions?
    I know the typical forum discussions focus on drivers, specs, or other technical topics, but I feel you might as well try to make the speakers look like something you could bring home from a high end store, hopefully even better.
     
  9. Pete Mazz

    Pete Mazz Supporting Actor

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    Quote:
    I am leaning toward Danish Oil with a Tung Oil finish coat. I am also considering a varnish finish coat over the Danish oil.
    Choose one of the three! If you want a very subtle low sheen, use the Danish oil. If you want more of a build and protection, the tung oil. If you want a built-up finish that can withstand abuse use polyurethane instead of varnish. Note: all these finishes will alter the color toward a darker shade and the poly will yellow over time. If you want a high build water clear finish use water-based polyurethane or lacquer.
    Pete
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  10. Chris_Campbell

    Chris_Campbell Stunt Coordinator

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    This is your first DIY attempt? That looks very professional! Nice work, hope it sounds great!
     
  11. GeorgeHolland

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    Update;
    I am getting close to the "finish" line, pardon the pun. Routing the top edge was a little nerve racking. The top was already glued on so if I screwed up there was no way to recover. Fortunately I was patient, made a lot of passes, slowly increased the depth of the router bit, and it turned out beautifully. Last night I applied some stain and early this morning put on the first coat of Tung oil. North Creek also sent me the tracking numbers for the Leviathan woofer, big posts, big toes, stuffing, etc., so I should have a finished product by early next week. I'm starting to think I can handle the main Vision speakers without any problem. This is fun.
    There are a few new pictures in the album.
    George
     
  12. Julian Data

    Julian Data Second Unit

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    George,
    How come you didn't route the top piece prior to assembly?
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  13. GeorgeHolland

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    Well, if you notice the top overhangs each leg by about 3/8 ", and i glued the top without any screws. To keep the top from floating when I clamped it down, I put 3/8" spacers just under the top , on the legs on each corner. I then used 4 clamps to keep the spacers and top edge square and centered on the top. I thought it would be easier to do this with a flat edge on the top.
    I also was committed to make the piece work due to the cost of the wood. I needed a secure surface as I do not have a shop table or router table. I did practice on enough scrap where I felt I could do a passable job. Yet with all that justification, I still would have liked to have secured the top after the edge was routed. All’s well that ends well.
    George
     

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