My new trees aren't happy... why?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Dave Poehlman, May 24, 2005.

  1. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    I did some landscaping a couple of weekends ago and planted some trees and shrubs.

    Over the past few days I noticed some of the leaves are turning black and shriveling. For example, here is a pic of my "Autumn Blaze" Maple:

    [​IMG]

    Albeit this tree is from Wal-Mart... but I also have some Dogwood and some Aspen from a reputable local nursery that are showing similar symptoms.

    I watered them thoroughly when I planted them. The weather has been cool since with some heavy rain. So, I thought they might be over-watered. But, isn't that hard to do with something planted in the ground? Also, I used some leftover fertilizer spikes when I put them in... so I thought perhaps that could be the problem. But, I've used spikes at my last house on a large Linden with no issues.

    Any ideas?
     
  2. Marko Berg

    Marko Berg Supporting Actor

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  3. Mort Corey

    Mort Corey Supporting Actor

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    Might just be shock from the transplant. Generally, time, and maybe a little vitamin B-1, and they'll come around.

    Mort
     
  4. Jeff Ulmer

    Jeff Ulmer Producer

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    I'm no expert, but plants seem to exhibit the same symptoms when over or under watered. When planting, you want to soak the soil to get it to settle around the roots. I wouldn't fertilize until it is established, the plant needs to overcome the shock of its new home and get its roots developing before expending energy on growing, and too much fertilizer can burn the roots.

    The plants could also have bugs if bought from a big box store. Depending on where the plants were grown, they may also be adjusting to your local soil and water conditions.

    What was the weather like when you planted them? Plants don't like being planted when it's hot, it is best when it is cool and damp. Did you break up the root system a bit when you planted?

    At this point I wouldn't go nuts trying to fix them, just make sure they have adequate water (don't drown them). They may drop their leaves, but can come back.
     
  5. Mary M S

    Mary M S Screenwriter

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    Its hard to tell, the resolution is not the best to see detail in the leaves. But I'm think I'm seeing some chomp marks upon many of your leaves, (unless its an akward angle in photo, which causes some leaves to appear foreshortened).

    If you are seeing "chomp" lines try dusting Sevin dust in a ring around the bottom of each tree, and renewing it after heavy rains for this season. (many pesties take advantage of young short things, which they will start to bother less, once plant/tree is well established, or past the early tender spring-leaf out

    If you planted your root ball too low it can stress like that (smothering the plant). Sun scorch can do it, if they are getting to much direct hours for the varieties.

    Did you use one (or several spikes) on each tree? You should always watch your ratio to size of plant and be wary of the "if a little is good more is better" trap. Over fertilization, can always 'burn' plants.

    Water once a week first summer and winter (deep slow trickle water) when no rain in your region for that week; to reduce greater stress till the roots establish.

    You don't want to water to root-rot, but those type varietes love a consant, lightly even - moist soil. Adbrut and repeated dry outs in rainless weeks first two winter/summers can shock the new transplant repeatdly.
     
  6. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
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  7. brentl

    brentl Cinematographer

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    "But the oak can't help their feeling if they like the way they're made"

    "And the trees are all kept equal
    By hatchet,
    Axe,
    And bad neighbours"

    Oh wait, wrong thread[​IMG]

    Brent
     
  8. Daren Welsh

    Daren Welsh Supporting Actor

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    These replies are getting pretty sappy ....
     
  9. Jeff Ulmer

    Jeff Ulmer Producer

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    Our bark is worse than out bite, so just leave it to beaver.
     
  10. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    I think it's a combination of drooping leaves and poor resolution (camera-phone pic). Now that I think about it, the leaves did look a little "tired" when I bought the thing from wal-mart. I'd bet it may have been over-watered by wal-mart when I got it and then I stuck it in the ground and watered it some more. Poor thing.
     
  11. Mary M S

    Mary M S Screenwriter

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    The crow has flown away:
    swaying in the evening sun,
    a leafless tree.

    - Soseki Natsume, 1900


    [​IMG] good luck!
     
  12. Bill Cowmeadow

    Bill Cowmeadow Second Unit

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    Trees planted the first year, especially if planted after the leaves come on, will simply not do well. Don't worry about them this year, next year, they'll take off.
     
  13. CRyan

    CRyan Screenwriter

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    Take out the spikes. It is my opinion that you should never fertilize a tree first year. It looks to me like the trees are "burning." Two years ago, I planted four trees - had 2 leftover spikes using them on two of the trees. The two I spiked died the following spring.
     
  14. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    Thanks, CRyan.. I'll dig 'em up tomorrow!
     
  15. Jim_F

    Jim_F Screenwriter

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    l(a

    le
    af
    fa
    ll

    s)
    one
    l

    iness

    -ee cummings
     
  16. andrew markworthy

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    Looking at the picture, I'd say it's possible you have a particularly virulent fungal/insect infection (shoot blight springs to mind). Take a diseased leaf to a local nursery and ask their advice. It may simply be a matter of spraying the plants, but be warned that if it is an infection/infestation, you could lose some or all of them. It could also be frost damage (though this is unlikely) - have you had some night-time frosts? It could also be underwatering.

    It is pretty difficult to overwater a plant provided you have good drainage - quite simply, the excess water will run off. I've never planted a maple, but I have planted dogwoods, and I've never had this sort of problem. The advice given in many Brit gardening books is to plant a plastic pipe feeding to just beyond the periphery of the roots of a new tree or large shrub and feed the water into it on a regular basis (this ensures the water gets to the roots and doesn't just get absorbed by the top soil). New trees need a lot of water to establish themselves.

    Feeding is a different matter. I'm assuming that you planted the tree straight from a container rather than bare-rooted (that would be the norm in the UK)? It's usual practice to put a little bit of feed underneath the root clump to encourage the roots to grow out into the surrounding earth. However, if you haven't done that, it's a bit late now. Provided your trees do survive, I'd recommend putting a liquid fertlizer down a few inches beyond the periphery of the roots - this will encourage the roots to grow out into the soil. Once a tree or shrub is firmly established, this probably isn't necessary unless you have very poor quality soil.
     

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