My HDTV shouldn't look this bad! Help!

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by runnersdialzero, Feb 4, 2004.

  1. runnersdialzero

    runnersdialzero Stunt Coordinator

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    I have a 42" Toshiba Widescreen HDTV. Bought it at Best Buy as a Open Box item. I pretty much bought this TV for DVD viewing only. I bought a Progressive Scan DVD player with 3:2 pulldown. The TV has 3:2 Pulldown as well. I bought Component Cables as well. The picture looks alright but it's very grainy. Not like the Zapruder film but I can tell there's something there. My girlfriend can't see it, but I can see it clear as day that something is wrong. It just doesn't look crisp to me. I'm seeing a lot of noise and it's just not sharp. Not as crisp as it should.

    On the back of my DVD player, there is a switch that goes from 525P(480P) to 525I(480I). I read a review for my TV that says that the picture looked great in 480P but not that great in 540P. Could this be it? What does that mean?

    Any suggestions on what I can do? Any help would be awesome. Thanks.

    Saxon
    [email protected]
     
  2. John S

    John S Producer

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    Does it look better when you switch it to 480i???

    Not that uncommon, some sets do a better job providing the progressive scan and 3:2 pull down, than when they input the same from a DVD player.
     
  3. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Saxon, are you used to RPTVs? Remember, images at the size let you see picture details that are not apparent on smaller direct-view sets. And "grain" is a film artifact, and many DVD producers are careful to give the image that same look. Another thing, RPTVs do not have the contrast ratio and light output common to direct-view sets.

    Finally, has the RPTV been adjusted/calibrated properly? The fact that your set was an open-box unit could be some cause for concern.
     
  4. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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    What Jack said.

    How big was your previous set? Your reaction is very common among people who are experiencing their first RPTV. Remember that a bigger screen doesn't mean more resolution; it means taking the existing resolution and blowing it up.

    Sounds like your TV "upconverts" some or all of its inputs to 540p. A lot of the newer Toshibas do that (you didn't specify the model). It sounds like the reviewer was saying that he preferred the direct progressive input from the DVD player to the TV's upconversion.

    M.
     
  5. John S

    John S Producer

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    Jack is very correct...

    If you only notice it on this and/or older movies, then try some modern stuff. Older movie grain is very easy to see in DVD's in larger screen sizes.

    heck after re-reading your post, I actually think that particular movie has grain on purpose.
     
  6. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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    Jack, Michael and John give good advice.

    Try playing a video DVD such as Finding Nemo or Toy Story. If you don’t see a crisp picture on these, then you may have a problem. If, on the other hand, you are seeing a crisp picture here, then you a likely are seeing the other movies correctly—the grain is a part of the film with which the movie was made. You won’t see this in Toy Story as everything is computer generated—it was not shot on film.

    You also might like to calibrate your TV with a Video Essentials or AVIA disk. Many people have found improvements when they have done this—others have seen very little benefit.
     
  7. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Do you get to choose between 480p and 540p? If so, just choose which looks better. For DVD and also regular TV and VHS sources, 480p is a more direct or straightforward processing compared with 540p which requires scaling. On most sets you don't have the choice.

    525p and 480p are different names for the same thing.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  8. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    Like stated above, try different DVD's... and a different player if you can. I notice a lot more artifacts on non-anamorphic material. Also, make sure you're using quality component cables for your hookup.



    Sounds like your set may be used. Invest in a calibration disk like Avia to make sure you're not still set on "torch" mode.

    Also, check out the Toshiba tips & tweaks at Keohi. There you can find out how to enter your set's service menu to do a more thorough convergence adjusment than the 9 point the user menu gives you.

    After using AVIA and doing a 56pt convergence on my 50HDX82, I noticed a much clearer, more natural picture... and my set was brand new.
     

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