My DIY TV Stand

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Bryan.T, Jan 2, 2006.

  1. Bryan.T

    Bryan.T Agent

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    This doesn't have much to do with the audio part but I figured I would post some pictures of my new TV stand I made. It seemed to take me longer to make then I originally planned, but I think it turned out pretty good. Let me know what you guys think for if you have any questions. I can post more pictures if you want to see something in particular.



    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Thanks,
    Bryan
     
  2. derekBannatyne

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    Wow that's nice...wish I had the skills to make it, I don't even have a power saw.
     
  3. SteveCallas

    SteveCallas Second Unit

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    VERY nice - what are the thick shelves made of and what name do those metal supports go by if anything?
     
  4. Bryan.T

    Bryan.T Agent

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    Thanks, this was the first piece of furniture I ever really made. It seemed like the set up before the cutting and routing took the most time. The top shelf is 1.5 inches thick, made with two 3/4 thick pieces of Maple plywood then trimmed in solid Maple. The other two large shelves appear to be 1.5 thick, but are a 3/4 inch thick piece of Maple plywood with a 1.5 inch tall solid piece of Maple with a rabbet cut to support plywood more (hind sight, not really necessary). The brand of extrude aluminum is 80/20 (the vertical silver pieces). There are other brands but this was available locally and looked a little better then some of the others.

    If I get time tonight I will post a picture with my actual equipment on it.

    Bryan
     
  5. Jason->D

    Jason->D Stunt Coordinator

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    how do the shelves attach to the tubing? i can see the support but do they screw in or slide into place. I really like the way it's supported as opposed to the common threaded rod idea if you could post some close up's of how the shelves sit that would be great as i'm looking at building a rack when the weather warms up a bit here and really like your look
     
  6. Bryan.T

    Bryan.T Agent

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    Here are a couple more pictures. The small shelves are held up by some blocks that are attached to the extruded aluminum with T-nuts. As you can see the aluminum have T shape slots on all four sides that allow you attach things to. I ordered the blocks from Salamader Design, which is what I based my stand on. I don't remember how much they were but I know they weren't cheap. You could probably get some other things cheaper, but you would have to get creative.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Bryan
     
  7. Scott_Vonhof

    Scott_Vonhof Agent

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    Bryan, I hate to say it, but I don't like the Salamander black shelf blocks. I looked at theirs before making my equipment rack and decided on a different path. I used the t-nut from Rose+Kreiger (they did black anodized finish much cheaper than 80/20 did, which I had to have) and then simply used a stainless steel washer from Mcmaster Carr and a socket head cap screw that was long enough to go through the t-nut, but not too long as to run out of room on the back of the t-nut. This simple combination holds my shelves in place and you can't see them, since I have 1x2 banding on the front of the shelves.
    [​IMG]

    I don't have any close-up pics of the rack showing the screws, but I can get some if they are needed.
     
  8. Bryan.T

    Bryan.T Agent

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    Scott,

    Before I build mine I did look at yours. I looked at the Rose Krieger, per your design. But I liked the looks of the 80/20 and its extra grooves. Plus, I think the prices for the 80/20 were cheaper for me.

    I like the looks of the Salamander blocks, but I didn't love the price. I originally planned on using just SHCS and t-nuts to hold my shelves, but like I said I liked the look of the Salamander better. Also, if some one wanted to add doors the shelves would be recessed already and be held front to back. If I make another one for the basement I might do the SHCS and T-nuts like you did. Can you get some pictures of how the shelves are prevented from moving forwards and backwards?

    By the way that is a nice theater.

    Bryan
     
  9. Scott_Vonhof

    Scott_Vonhof Agent

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    Bryan, 80/20 will probably be cheaper, especially if you can use the stuff they put up on their ebay store(http://stores.ebay.com/8020-Inc-Garage-Sale. But, if you want the black anodized finish like I got, Rose+Kreiger is the only way to go. They don't charge a fixed "lot" price, but instead will do batches and price the parts accordingly. I think the parts I got (8 24" long sections of 40x40) would have been close to double the cost if I had gone through 80/20, just because of the anodizing.

    I don't have anything in place stoping the shelves from moving forward, I don't have kids and the rack won't be subject to any movement or shaking at all. As for moving backwards, that is simply the 1/x banding that I have on the front that pushes against the front of the screw-head.

    BTW, for those that may not know what a SHCS (Socket Head Cap Screw) is, here is a picture:
    [​IMG]
    from: http://www.mcmaster.com/

    I will get my digital camera back from my sister tonight and will take some more pics of my rack and post them on here tomorrow.
     
  10. Bryan.T

    Bryan.T Agent

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    Yea I did even bother getting a cost for the black anodized, I like the light wood with the plain aluminum. However, if I did dark wood I would have tried to get black anodized. I ended up getting the 8020 localely, not from ebay, so I could have even gotten it cheaper. Actually when I was looking at your website today I noticed you did have a picture of the Socket Head Cap Screw in the frame work.

    http://www.vonhofs.com/theater/theater_1-22-04.html

    What type of wood did you use and how did you get it so dark? I am thinking of making a corner TV stand for the bedroom and I want to get it almost black, but still be able to see the grain like you did.

    Bryan
     
  11. Scott_Vonhof

    Scott_Vonhof Agent

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    Ah, there you go! I didn't look that far back at my pics, I forgot I had that one on there.

    The black finish is done with all the tips and ideas from Joe L. and his various speaker projects. I used 3/4" thick oak plywood and red oak 1x2 banding, glued and nailed together. I then used a black analine die that I got from Woodworkers Supply. To use this, you mix the powder into almost boiling water and let it cool. I then applied via spray cans, a dead flat laquer finish. This stuff is crazy, cause you really can't tell it is even on there after it dries, because it looks just like you let the black die dry on the wood. The thing is, it does help seal and protect the wood.

    Since my rack was below the screen, I didn't want reflections off the top surface, otherwise, I would have gone with a different finish. I tried Minwax Ebony stain, on oak plywood, but it just didn't get the black that I wanted. The smooth part of the grain was still a wood shade, just tinted while the grain itself was getting close to black. I wanted everything to be black, but still show the grain, like you want.
     
  12. Chris Moe

    Chris Moe Screenwriter

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    Stand looks great! Good job.
     
  13. Scott_Vonhof

    Scott_Vonhof Agent

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    The problem with getting them anodized locally is that they are already clear anodized and would have to be stripped first.

    As for Rose+Kreiger, when I went to their web site originally, it really sucked. So, I ordered a catalog and then called the local rep (he was in MD.) to get pricing.

    As for lengths, I ordered exactly what I wanted, that way it comes in exact, not off by 1/16" her or there. They have the equpment for doing it, so let them do it, unless you have access to a metal cutting mill. Another thing to remember is that Rose+Kreiger installs threaded inserts in the ends so you can attach everything via 6mm bots. 80/20 doesn't install inserts, but instead taps the aluminum directly. So, if you want to cut your own to length, you need to be able to both cut it accuratly and tap it or install the inserts.

    I just looked back at my order and I paid $21 each for 2 foot long sections cut and inserts installed, black anodized. The spring loaded t-nuts were $0.75 each. Keep in mind that this was over two years ago, so prices may have changed.

    I ordered through Phoenix Mecano, Fredrick Md., 301-696-9800
     
  14. Bryan.T

    Bryan.T Agent

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    I agree I would not get them anodized locally for the reasons you said. I also ordered mine right to length, which makes making one of these stands relatively easy. Taping the ends of the 80/20 was not difficult, just boring and time consuming. I also put felt in between the aluminum and wood, which trimming it was tedious.

    These definitely cost more to make then a flexy stand, but when you compare how much it would cost to buy a similar one they are pretty cheap. I probably have like $250 in material in mine. It would cost over $800 to buy a stand like I made and around $1000 for the one Scott made.

    Bryan
     
  15. Scott_Vonhof

    Scott_Vonhof Agent

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    I agree Bryan, I think I had a total of $320 invested and with all the options from Salamander, for the Triple 30 with casters and the sides would be $1200 plus shipping or tax or both.
    [​IMG]
     
  16. Scott_Vonhof

    Scott_Vonhof Agent

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    Oh, and of course, the Salamander unit is only 65" wide, I wanted to fill the space below my screen, so I made mine 94" wide.
     

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