Musical speakers?

Discussion in 'Speakers & Subwoofers' started by Mike_T_, May 28, 2004.

  1. Mike_T_

    Mike_T_ Stunt Coordinator

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    I have Paradigm Studio 100 v2's in a 2 channel music only system. They certainly sound great. However, I've never had other 'high end' speakers in my basement before. I'm curious if there are speakers out there, for under 2,000 that would be MUCH more musical?

    I've heard great things about Maggies for their open airy quality. Also, that good book shelf speakers can eliminate the 'boxy' sound of large towers.

    I realize everyone's opinion can be different depending on their tastes. I was just curious if there are speakers universally known for music reproduction.

    Thanks!
     
  2. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    Pardigm SIGNATURE, Vienna Acoustics, Sonus Faber, Thiel, Aerial, Joseph Audio, many more...

    You'll have to look in your respective price range, as they are in various price ranges, and to get under $2k, you may need to look at the bookshelf speakers in many cases. The Joseph Audio RM22 is $2499, and will easily outperform the 100s. The RM7Si is also more musical, IMO, at just under $2k.

    For the price, I'd recommend looking into the A/V-2 or A/V-3 from www.gr-research.com, both well within your price range. My setup consists of three A/V-2s and two A/V-1s. Very musical speakers, and I chose them over v3 Paradigm Studios.
     
  3. Mike_T_

    Mike_T_ Stunt Coordinator

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    Maybe a better question would be, what qualities would you look for in a speaker which would indicate it was 'musical'

    Without being able to audition so many speakers that are out there, I would hope certain characterstics of a speaker design woule lend themselves to be more adept at music reproduction as opposed to home theater.
     
  4. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    No, it's not that simple. You can't read specs and tell how a speaker sounds, and even a good spec sheet might not give you a speaker that you like. You pretty much have to audition, and try to narrow the field down from recommendations.

    My speakers are very good with music, but they are still very adept at HT.
     
  5. Philip>L

    Philip>L Stunt Coordinator

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    A speaker should be able to reproduce the source material as accurately as possible without coloring the sound in any way.

    There's no reason why a speaker should be better at music or home theater. If it can accurately reproduce the source material, then it'll work great in either application.

    Let your ears be the best judge.
     
  6. Mike_T_

    Mike_T_ Stunt Coordinator

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    So essentially there isn't some universally accepted speaker/s that are known for their ability with music?

    I tend to disagree with you Phillip about mucic and home theater speakers. It's been my experience that it's much easier for an inexpensive 'best buy' speaker to reproduce movies in a very satisfying way. Where as faitfully trying to convey music in a natural and convincing way takes a much higher end speaker. It just seems more difficult for speakers to play a song then an explosion.

    I have a pair of $700 Eoson towers I got from Best Buy many years ago. They sound bright, electronic and 'fake' when I listen to music. However, for Home Theater they're fantastic.
    The Paradigms soun much more warm and natural with music etc. Still, they're also very good with home theater so I agree, one set of speakers CAN do both.

    Still, I can't help but think that there are othere speakers out there that for music, would better recreate what the music intended.
     
  7. Tony Genovese

    Tony Genovese Supporting Actor

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    Leaving aside planers which are a whole different kettle of fish, you must decide if you want "accuracy" or coloration. If a speaker is accurate, it will reproduce what the music intended... But, if you prefer a depressed midrange (the BBC dip), slightly fat mid bass, and a polite high end, it may "sound" more musical, but it's colored, inaccurate, and not what the music intended.
     
  8. ScottCHI

    ScottCHI Screenwriter

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    guess that's why there are so many speaker manufacturers out there, huh?

    different speakers sound different. period.

    to characterize a speaker's sound as "music" or "ht" is really no different than calling a speaker a better rock speaker, jazz speaker, or classical speaker. and those categorizations definitely DO exist.

    sorry, but there's no such thing as a perfect speaker.
     
  9. Tony Genovese

    Tony Genovese Supporting Actor

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    OK, I'll bite. Tell me a speaker that's a good jazz speaker. And then, a good classical speaker. I'll leave rock alone, since it's never (that I'm aware) recorded in a real space (except maybe live concerts) but right to the mixing board.

    Will the good jazz speaker sound bad on classical and vice versa? Just trying to learn here.

    Thanks
     
  10. ScottCHI

    ScottCHI Screenwriter

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    don't know one. i picked those VERY broad and general categories as representative examples of the way people try and categorize a speaker's sound.

    i could have just as easily said "piano speaker" or "violin speaker", but knew that'd be received even more enthusiastically. [​IMG]

    my point is that speakers DO sound different, and that if someone finds one speaker more appropriate for a particular application than another speaker, it shouldn't be that hard to grasp.

    the categories may be "contrived", but the differences do exist.
     
  11. Tony Genovese

    Tony Genovese Supporting Actor

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    Well of course speakers sound different. But the ultimate goal to me is accuracy. If you compare speakers that strive for accuracy, you'll find much less difference in their basic sound than you'd think. It's when the designers try to impose a sonic signature, that you'll hear larger differences IMHO.
     
  12. Philip>L

    Philip>L Stunt Coordinator

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    My point, once again, is that if a speaker can accurately reproduce music then it should also do just fine as a home theater speaker.
     
  13. Dan Hine

    Dan Hine Screenwriter

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    A good jazz speaker? Something high efficiency,problably with a horn tweeter (or horn loaded woofer too) but I suppose maybe ribbon tweeters too. They have that edge, that sizzle, that bite that a lot of jazz listeners love because they like the same kind of "rub" that good jazz muscians put into their music.

    A good classical speaker? Something toned down a little, less forward...maybe a little more refined and present midrange/upper low range to give the sound a warmer quality.

    Of course there are crossbreeds that do both well but many speakers have their strong points. I used to own a pair of Adire HE10.1's and they worked great for jazz, rock, bluegrass, and HT. But I had heard better speakers for more classical recordings...like the Polk RT1000i's they replaced.

    - Dan Hine
     
  14. DonJ

    DonJ Second Unit

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    My Paradigm Monitor's do Jazz and Rock very well but Classical and Contemporary Orchestral ie LOTR are lacking a little but nothing I can't live with.
     
  15. Seth--L

    Seth--L Screenwriter

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    For classical, I find that by B&W 602s do an excellent job creating a realistic sense of depth -- it sounds like the brass and winds really are behind the strings. Even mono recordings from the '40s and '50s have depth when played on them.
     
  16. Mike_T_

    Mike_T_ Stunt Coordinator

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    Sorry Phillip, I see your point now.

    Now, Magnapan's are certainly something I'm looking at. One downside I could see with a good set of 'bookshelf' speakers is that my studio 100's can get loud, very, very loud if I feel like doing so. I'm wondering if bookshelf speakers could blast a decent size room with concert level decibels?

    The maggie's are fantastic...I'm not sure if you can get that airy sense from any box speaker. Ignorant statement I'm sure, as I haven't heard a tramendous amount of speaker makes..
     
  17. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    If you want bookshelf speakers to go loud, you will want to look at the larger ones, with more drivers. The ability to move more air will give you not necessarily more extension, but more sensitivity and ability to pump out volume. A good example would be the Stuido 20 vs 40 - the 40 is able to fill a larger room more convincingly.
     
  18. fletcherS

    fletcherS Auditioning

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    Where can I find these speakers? Which brands? Thanks!
     
  19. DonJ

    DonJ Second Unit

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    I would look at B&W they are the UK's favorite.
     
  20. Tony Genovese

    Tony Genovese Supporting Actor

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    B&W has strayed from the classic BBC sound. Take a look at Spendor (their classic line)and Harbeth. You'll need to search them out, but they offer the best in classic "British" sound available today.
     

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