Music/Movie modes on subwoofers

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Sacha_C, Feb 1, 2003.

  1. Sacha_C

    Sacha_C Second Unit

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    What exactly does the Music/Movie modde switch on subwoofers do? I don't see any difference between the 2.

    Thanks
     
  2. Jason Wilcox

    Jason Wilcox Supporting Actor

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    i had a yamaha with a music/movie switch. as far as i could tell...music was neutral...and movie just upped the bass at some frequencies and made the sub too boomy...so i left it on music all the time
     
  3. MichaelMOS

    MichaelMOS Agent

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    I think that the music mode is supposed to produce more accurate bass while the movie mode pruduces bass that is not as tight.
     
  4. Sacha_C

    Sacha_C Second Unit

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    what is "tight bass"?
     
  5. david stark

    david stark Second Unit

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    Not sure if this is the same, but I have a REL strata III sub and it has an LFE (low frequency effect) and line modes.

    The line mode is used for high level input (connected to the speaker output from your amp so the sub gets the same signal as the speakers). The LFE channel has low input (phono lead to the LFE out of a dolby/DTS decoder). What the mode switch does is turn on/off the subs internal roll off frequency stuff.

    When you set up for listening to music you set on the sub the roll off frequency to match your main speakers since for music there are only 2 channels and not a specific channel for a sub so the subwoofer plays the sounds that are below the roll off frequency that you have set that are too low for your main speakers. When listening to a dolby/dts source there is a dedicated channel for the sub so it doesn't need to be matched to the speakers you are using, but just to play everything.

    for example if your main speakers are good down to 60Hz you would set the subs roll off frequency to 60Hz, this is fine for music. Then say you watch a film in dolby and the sub channel has some sounds that are at 70Hz your sub will not play them because the roll off freq is set to 60 and thus won't play anything over 60Hz, but by simply by switching mode to LFE on the REL it will play everything it gets.

    If your sub allows you to set a roll off frequency manually (independantly from the rest of your setup) then I suspect the movie/music switch will ignore this and play everything in movie mode, but take it into account when set to music.
     
  6. MichaelMOS

    MichaelMOS Agent

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    "tight" bass is bass that follows the music, it is less boomy and more accurate. I can't really explan it that well.
     
  7. Rory Buszka

    Rory Buszka Supporting Actor

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    The switch probably adjusts the damping factor of the internal circuitry so the woofers tend to bounce around more for movies and with music, the bass starts and stops just as it was intended. It is not two different levels for movies and music, it is simply that the subwoofer will produce more nebulous bass that sounds like it's playing louder, but without precision. I'd say if you are wanting for more bass while in "music" mode, then get a bigger subwoofer.

    The other possibility is that in movie mode, there may be a rumble filter to filter out stuff below 25 or 30 Hz so that the signal dowsn't cause the amplifier to suck away all the power that the amplifier's power supply can provide, simply to produce frequencies lower than the woofer drivers themselves are capable of playing. Then in music mode, the rumble filter is removed, so that deep bass notes can be reached with precision.

    Really good subwoofers don't need movie/music switches. They have enough driver displacement and amplifier power to take those low frequencies in movies and deliver them with punch and clarity.
     
  8. Rob Rodier

    Rob Rodier Supporting Actor

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