Multi-level drop ceiling?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jason Price, Nov 5, 2001.

  1. Jason Price

    Jason Price Second Unit

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    In one of the rooms of the basement I'm finishing, there is a lot of duct work that I'm going to have to work my ceiling around. I'd like to put in a drop ceiling for ease of installation in this case, but I don't really want to lose the 12"+ on either side of the ductwork. So, I'm wondering if it's possible to do a 2-level drop ceiling. Logistically, it doesn't seem like it would be very difficult to do, it's more a matter of whether or not there are ways to cover vertical drops with a ceiling tile. Anyone know if this is possible?
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    -Jason
    If at first you don't succeed, see if the loser gets anything...
     
  2. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    My last house had a finished "L" shaped basement. The ceiling on one leg of the "L" was 4-5 inches shorter than the other for the same reason as you describe.
    Whomever did the ceiling just made the frame bend vertical and inserted some cut tiles in the spaces... you may want to glue them in place as mine were a little precarious and were hard to set back in place if I removed one of the adjacent panels.
     
  3. Mike LS

    Mike LS Supporting Actor

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    When I finished my basement HT, I had ductwork running all over the place that threatened to lower my ceiling by up to a foot. I managed to re-route 75% of it, and the only long run that I could't run between the floor joists I put up against a wall and framed it into the wall.
    So along one wall the ceiling is about 8 inches lower than the rest. Also, I didn't use tiles to do this, I used sheetrock to put on the drop down frame.
    If you can re-route some ductwork in between your floor joist and only have to drop the ceiling near a wall, you can do the same. The outcome was to my liking.
    Email if you'd like some pics.
     
  4. Jason Price

    Jason Price Second Unit

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    Unfortunately, moving the duct work is not an option. The ducting in question is my trunkline, and it runs the entire length of my basement, perpendicular to the ceiling joists...
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    -Jason
    If at first you don't succeed, see if the loser gets anything...
     
  5. ace peterson

    ace peterson Second Unit

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    You have the same problem I had in my basement. However, I was not doing the home theater; I was doing a study/office room. I had a air duct, and some water pipes and I think a gas line all running together on one side of the room. I built a regular soffit out of 2x3's and drywall around those things and once that was done I hung the suspended ceiling throughout the rest of the room.
    I think it looks really nice. We painted our ceiling tiles a light light shade of a greyish green color, but before we did that we painted that soffit the same color. We had a power sprayer to paint which made it super easy. I think that is the only way you could paint ceiling tiles since they have so much porosity. I put a few recessed lights in the soffit, too. Most people who have seen it think I did the whole soffit thing on purpose since the lights are in it, but they are surprised when I tell them that I had no choice in the matter and that there was a bunch of ducts and pipes behind there.
    That's the only way I could think to do it. I'm not aware of any way to hang ceiling tiles vertically.
     
  6. Guy Kuo

    Guy Kuo Supporting Actor

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    I've seen acoustic ceiling tiles placed vertically in some commercial installations, but I scratch my head when it comes to figuring out how they did it. The tracks looked like they were custom cut to length and they had been pop rivetted together. I imaging some sort of clip or other support was needed to keep the tiles in position. Externally, I couldn't tell.
     
  7. Mike LS

    Mike LS Supporting Actor

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    Jason,
    My situation was pretty much the same. When I said I rerouted, I mean I rerouted every duct that ran off of the main 12" line in between the floor joists. The main line still ran across the joists, but I was able to move it against a wall and close it in with the drywall.
    Sounds like ace is talking about the same thing.
     

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