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Movies You Changed Your Mind About (1 Viewer)

Thomas T

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Haven't we all changed our mind about a movie upon revisiting it at one time or another? Perhaps a movie you loved as a kid but upon seeing it as an adult, you think "I can't believe I liked that!" or perhaps a film you saw in your youth that you disliked but when you saw it years later thought, "Ah! Now I get it". Here are two examples of mine and please feel free to post your own.

8 1/2 (1963): I saw this Fellini film in college and hated it. Boring and pretentious I thought. Many, many years later, encouraged to see it again, I did. And I loved it. No doubt my life experiences since my college years made me appreciate its artistry.

Gladiator (2000): I thought this was fantastic upon first seeing it opening week. A revisit several years later had me scratching my head. What was I thinking? What a dreadful ugly looking movie. My guess was that I got caught up in the hype the movie received as well as the excitement of seeing a major "epic" film. Don't even think of it in the same breath as Spartacus or Falll Of The Roman Empire!
 
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Angelo Colombus

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One great example for me was Fritz Lang's Metropolis. Saw it when i was a kid back in the late 1970's on my local UHF station and it was a terrible print of the film with a terrible score that had nothing to do with the film. Did not like it but now with restoration it's a completely different film and a masterpiece. The same with How The West Was Won where i saw it on tv in a pan & scan format with washed out colors and thought the film was so-so but now i proudly have the Blu-ray on my shelf.
 

Thomas T

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One great example for me was Fritz Lang's Metropolis. Saw it when i was a kid back in the late 1970's on my local UHF station and it was a terrible print of the film with a terrible score that had nothing to do with the film. Did not like it but now with restoration it's a completely different film and a masterpiece. The same with How The West Was Won where i saw it on tv in a pan & scan format with washed out colors and thought the film was so-so but now i proudly have the Blu-ray on my shelf.

It's amazing how the scoring of a silent film can affect one's enjoyment of the film. I can't imagine watching Dreyer's Passion Of Joan Of Arc without Richard Einhorn's score (on the Criterion transfer).
 

Matt Hough

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The first one that springs to my mind is Nashville. My first encounter left me knowing it was special, but it was such a downer, and there were SO many characters that one viewing simply wasn't enough, and I let that screening confused and conflicted. Over the years as I sorted out everything and saw how amazing the construction was, how terrific the performances were, and what telling satire the movie contained, I ultimately realized it was a masterpiece.
 

Walter Kittel

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One of the most obvious ones for me was Citizen Kane. I was aware of the film's reputation and my initial viewing was on PBS many years ago (around Christmas?) I could see the quality of the production on screen, but thematically it didn't resonate with a much, much younger version of myself. The passage of time and life itself made the film much more relevant in my later years. Never disliked the film, but I can appreciate it a lot more these days as there are less flakes of snow remaining in my snow globe (to mix metaphors).

- Walter.
 

Ed Lachmann

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My folks took me to see Night of the Iguana when I was 12...HATED it. Why are those two people walking of broken glass, Mom? Now I love it and understand all the "adult talk" and the walking on glass. I lost a lot of love for Citizen Kane, too, once I really delved into the wonderful films of Marion Davies later in life...not a hysterical talentless drunk at all. Now Kane seems rather mean spirited and nasty to me, although I still enjoy most of the rest of it.
 

Thomas T

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One of the most obvious ones for me was Citizen Kane. I was aware of the film's reputation and my initial viewing was on PBS many years ago (around Christmas?) I could see the quality of the production on screen, but thematically it didn't resonate with a much, much younger version of myself. The passage of time and life itself made the film much more relevant in my later years. Never disliked the film, but I can appreciate it a lot more these days as there are less flakes of snow remaining in my snow globe (to mix metaphors).

- Walter.

My first exposure to Citizen Kane was less than ideal. I saw it at a revival house in San Francisco in the early 1970s. This was way before TCM, physical media, streaming etc. so the theatre was jam packed with movie nerds, college students etc. Unfortunately, the theatre was nearly sold out and all I could get was a seat in the very first row. Which meant I had to watch the entire movie with my head tilted all the way back uncomfortably. This made it impossible to appreciate the film properly. I didn't see it again until Criterion released their first laser disc in 1984 which was Citizen Kane. It was only then that the light bulb went on and I saw why it was regarded as a masterpiece.
 

Thomas T

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My folks took me to see Night of the Iguana when I was 12...HATED it. Why are those two people walking of broken glass, Mom? Now I love it and understand all the "adult talk" and the walking on glass.

I was a bit older than you when I saw Night Of The Iguana. I was 14. I was taken to it by my movie addict Uncle. Two things I remember from that experience. My first exposure to and a crush on Sue Lyon (I was too young to be allowed to see Lolita) and my Uncle bitterly complaining that Ava Gardner was billed before Deborah Kerr. To him, Kerr was an actress. Gardner, a mere movie star. :lol:
 

bujaki

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1969. I'm 19. College sophomore/junior. Counterculture. Easy Rider. Wow. Those gun-totin' bastards killing those freedom-loving long-haired riders. What a gut punch!
I'm 70. Find the movie unwatchable and overrated. My 19 year-old ideas from college haven't changed though.
 

Thomas T

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1969. I'm 19. College sophomore/junior. Counterculture. Easy Rider. Wow. Those gun-totin' bastards killing those freedom-loving long-haired riders. What a gut punch!
I'm 70. Find the movie unwatchable and overrated. My 19 year-old ideas from college haven't changed though.

I was in college too when it came out. However, as luck would have it I was working my way through college (tuition was more reasonable then) as an usher in a movie theatre in San Francisco (I was attending SF State). The art house I ushered at was showing Easy Rider and it was an exclusive engagement meaning we were the only theater in San Francisco (and the Bay Area I think) showing the movie. It played for 30 weeks to packed houses and I must have seen the film in either its entirety or bits and pieces 40 times at least! Needless to say I haven't wanted to see it in years but the last time I watched it (the 90s?), I came up with the same assessment you did. The film is very much an artifact of its era and younger people who watch it (like my nephews) today find the "heroes" of the film obnoxious and jerks. Time has not been kind to it.
 

ManW_TheUncool

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Thought Blade Runner was too slow and boring when I first saw it in my late teens back in the late 80's -- and I wasn't exactly the impatient sort. Not anymore of course...

Meanwhile, Short Circuit definitely hasn't held up at all, LOL... but my kids really want to see it again -- they think I hid it (only the old DVD) from them on purpose, haha...

_Man_
 

Doug MacGregor

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I have few but off the top of my head I would have to say The Graduate.
I originally liked it when I watched it in the 70s but I watched again last year and found it exceedingly boring.
Apart from the obvious "signature" scenes (Mrs. Robinson, are you trying to seduce me?), etc. the movie seems to plod along. I actually didn't finish watching it.
I guess my tastes have changed.
 

mackjay

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1969. I'm 19. College sophomore/junior. Counterculture. Easy Rider. Wow. Those gun-totin' bastards killing those freedom-loving long-haired riders. What a gut punch!
I'm 70. Find the movie unwatchable and overrated. My 19 year-old ideas from college haven't changed though.

Same here, though I never loved Easy Rider (saw it in 69 and a couple times since, last time in 2015)

My big turnaround was THE GODFATHER. Saw it in 71 when I was the wrong age for it and also because I had not yet learned how to watch this kind of film (pay close attention to dialog, remember character names, etc). Now I love it
 

Thomas T

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I have few but off the top of my head I would have to say The Graduate.
I originally liked it when I watched it in the 70s but I watched again last year and found it exceedingly boring.
Apart from the obvious "signature" scenes (Mrs. Robinson, are you trying to seduce me?), etc. the movie seems to plod along. I actually didn't finish watching it.
I guess my tastes have changed.

Another film time has not been kind to. Bancroft's Mrs. Robinson comes across a Gale Sondergaard villainess from a 1940s movie. One of the many reasons I wish Doris Day wouldn't have turned down the role. She would have brought a softness and a little empathy to the part.
 

ChrisOC

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Good thread!

I saw Vertigo on TV when I was a kid, and although I had trouble following all elements (kid's brain) it was spooky and memorable. I revisited it about 10 years ago on TCM, and...nothing. I actually found it boring, not because of the movie's age and time period, but it just didn't do anything for me, as other Hitchcock films.

I liked elements of Tomorrowland when I first saw it, but it seemed overlong. When I watched it a second time, it felt entirely different. I have ADD and sometimes small elements will go in one eye and out the other, so that may have something to do with it. Now it doesn't feel long at all, and I like its message.

The first time I saw Buckaroo Banzai, I was bored. I remember watching it with an old friend, and about halfway through he said "is it just me, or is this boring?" We watched it all the way through and then forgot about it. These days, I can watch it anytime and love every minute.
 

ChrisOC

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The same with How The West Was Won where i saw it on tv in a pan & scan format with washed out colors and thought the film was so-so but now i proudly have the Blu-ray on my shelf.
I'm the other way around. I saw it in its original Cinerama run when I was a kid, and it was dazzling, incredibly long, but it held my attention even at age 8. I bought the blu-ray restoration when it was released, and while the print and scenery are beautiful, the movie itself came across as boring. It seems to have been made to show off Cinerama more than the filmmakers' skill -- although, to be fair to the directors, Cinerama was very clumsy in actual use.
 

dpippel

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My biggest two are Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, and The Big Lebowski. I saw both during their original theatrical runs and came away unimpressed. I thought Powers was simply stupid, and Lebowski a rather boring follow-up to the Coen's excellent Fargo. HOWEVER, I got both when they were released on home video and grew to love them. I now consider Austin Powers to be a tour-de-force of outrageous humor, with a heart, and The Big Lebowski is simply perfect and my favorite Coen brothers film. It just gets better every time I watch it.
 

ChrisOC

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One of the most obvious ones for me was Citizen Kane. I was aware of the film's reputation and my initial viewing was on PBS many years ago (around Christmas?) I could see the quality of the production on screen, but thematically it didn't resonate with a much, much younger version of myself. The passage of time and life itself made the film much more relevant in my later years. Never disliked the film, but I can appreciate it a lot more these days as there are less flakes of snow remaining in my snow globe (to mix metaphors).

- Walter.
I know my opinion isn't a popular one, but I find this movie boring. The cinematography and other technical elements are brilliant, but the story is too slight to fill up all that time, and it comes across as a radio play. Except for Rosebud, you don't need to see the images to know what's going on. I find The Battle Over Citizen Kane much more interesting.
 

ChrisOC

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My folks took me to see Night of the Iguana when I was 12...HATED it. Why are those two people walking of broken glass, Mom? Now I love it and understand all the "adult talk" and the walking on glass. I lost a lot of love for Citizen Kane, too, once I really delved into the wonderful films of Marion Davies later in life...not a hysterical talentless drunk at all. Now Kane seems rather mean spirited and nasty to me, although I still enjoy most of the rest of it.
Yeah, it's pretty clear that Welles' distaste for Hearst spilled over to everyone who surrounded him.
 

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