mouting speakers

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by RyanB, Jan 6, 2004.

  1. RyanB

    RyanB Extra

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    i will be mouting my speakers to the ceiling or wall in my living room with the wires run inside the wall from behind the tv, up to the attic then out the wall at the rear speaker locations.

    this is the first home theater i have ever set up and was wondering how does everyone have the speaker wire coming out of the wallor ceiling to connect to the speakers? i have a speaker wall plate for behind the tv - speaker wires plug into the front of it with spring clamps and connect behind it to run up the wall - but i don't think those would look good on the ceiling or wall where the rears will be.

    how has everyone else "dressed" their speaker wire exits?

    thanks
    ryan
     
  2. Kevin*Ha

    Kevin*Ha Agent

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    I hid the exit behind the speaker so all I needed to do was find a rubber washer that was off-white (the color of my walls) and fit it to the hole to run the wire out of a smooth exit. It's right behind the speaker so it can't be seen. If this isn't an option you'll probably want something a little less obvious.
     
  3. Johnny Mo

    Johnny Mo Agent

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    Ryan,

    I have, it is a much cleaner look IMHO over wires hanging directly out of the sheetrock. I used a set of Niles Audio gold-plated 5 way binding posts at my surround speaker exits. I used an "old work" plastic (ROMEX) single gang box in the wall to attach it to. I can email you a picture if you like, it was very easy to do. The Niles Audio jacks I got from Crutchfield (I know they are more expensive, but I was too lazy to surf around for cheaper ones), and the boxes I got from Home Depot for about $1 each or something like that.
     
  4. RyanB

    RyanB Extra

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    I'd love a pic

    I'm familiar with installing plates and blue work boxes in sheet rock.

    Thanks
     
  5. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    that's really going to be your primary concern - aesthetics.

    i kinda agree that, when the plate is visible, those gold connections can be kinda obtrusive. some may like the high-tech look.

    you could probably get away with a gang box, then a regular wall plate with a hole (i'm thinking of coax tv cable plates) to cover it. then, it's just a simple wire sticking out. it may be a more clean look. plus, as an added benefit, it's one less "jump" in the signal chain.

    but again, i'd definitely say it's just personal preference.
     
  6. Johnny Mo

    Johnny Mo Agent

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    Ryan,

    here's a few pics of my surround mounts and wallplates.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
  7. mike_bianchi

    mike_bianchi Extra

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    Actually for low voltage applications you don't even need a box - just a frame. They have aluminum ones that with tabs than bend to hold themselves in place and nicer plastic ones that have tabs that flip into place when tightened with it's integrated screw.

    You just cut a rectangular hole in the sheetrock (using your frame as a template), then insert the frame and set the tabs (whichever type). You don't have to attach it to a stud - anywhere works. You are left with a rimmed hole in your sheetrock with the female holes for your wall plate screws. Much easier than using an actual gang box.

    You can get these from any electrical supply place. The brand name I use is "Caddy".

    Very clean and easy.
     
  8. Johnny Mo

    Johnny Mo Agent

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    mike,

    I was actually looking for the frames, but Home Depot didn't have them. It actually worked out better though, because I ran mine from the basement up. The boxes have the little tabs to clip the wire in place, so there isn't an extra 9' of speaker wire's extra weight pulling down on my connections. Also, with such a small opening it would be difficult to secure the wire into place. If you are going from the attic down I would agree the frames are better/easier/cheaper.
     
  9. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    good point mike. that's the technique the phone-guy used when he intalled a new jack in my living room.

    the wire weight issue is a good point though. maybe you could somehow secure the wire so there wasn't too much tension.

    that's a nice setup johnny! looks neat...
     
  10. mike_bianchi

    mike_bianchi Extra

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    Never thought about the wire weight - my applications so far haven't had that problem. If the frame would work better than a box on a particular application, then I'm sure some sort of cable tie or other rig could be made.

    I get my frames from a local electrical/lighting supply place that most of the contractors use. I've never seen them in a big-box store. But somewhere in your area, there is probably a similar place where the builders and contractors get their stuff...

    Very nice installs pictured!
     

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