Most Probably a Very Simple Science Question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Kenneth, Dec 15, 2002.

  1. Kenneth

    Kenneth Supporting Actor

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    My understanding is that the mass extinction that occurred about 65 million years ago and took out the dinos was not a cold vs warm blood thing but a big vs small. The big critters (dinos) died out and the small critters (mammals and reptiles) didn't.

    Incidentally there was a far worse extinction that occurred much earlier that took out the reptiles and cleared the way for the dinos. Mass extinctions are just nature's way of engaging in natural selection.

    As to books, I am not sure which are best. However, with all the recent Evolution series that have been out there should be some book tie ins for them.

    Kenneth

    "That's weird, it seems to have put my reply first. Maybe it will correct itself."
     
  2. Ike

    Ike Screenwriter

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    I'm sure this will seem like an elementary question for some, so I apologize in advance.

    I'm assuming the dinosaurs evolved, and then became extinct. Did all warm blooded animals on the planet (wasn't the latest theory the dinosaurs were warm blooded?) die? If so, did the evolutionary cycle for apes start after the dinosaurs extinction? Is there any evidence there were ape like creatures in dinosaur times?

    BTW, does anybody know a good book detailing the facts of evolution for the layman, i.e. comparing it to other theories? I was thinking about going with The Blind Watchmaker, but since it's quite a few years old, I'm sure there are more up to date works.
     
  3. BrianW

    BrianW Cinematographer

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    Kenneth, can I borrow your time machine?

    I promise to have it back an hour ago.
     
  4. Brian Harnish

    Brian Harnish Screenwriter

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    Ike- It's not exactly that simple. The Dinosaurs didn't just suddenly become "extinct." They were wiped out by an asteroid (or was it a comet?) that struck the Yucatan Peninsula about 65 million years ago.
     
  5. Kenneth

    Kenneth Supporting Actor

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    Brian H,
    It's not that simple either. The dinos were on their way out already and ecological cataclysm simply proved to be the straw that broke the dinos back. Climates were already changing before the dinos went extinct and its possible they would have gone out, even without the impact.
    Kenneth
    BrianW, looks like my time machine batteries ran out. guess i should have used duracel [​IMG]
     
  6. Dan Hine

    Dan Hine Screenwriter

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    No, see....it was all the raw meat that the carnivores/omnivores were eating. They got food poisoning. Then with no meat eating dinos to ensure crowd control, the herbivores just ate up all the available food. They then died out from starvation. [​IMG]
     
  7. Wayne Bundrick

    Wayne Bundrick Cinematographer

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    I started reading this thread and I'm thinking, "So where's the simple science question?"

    How the hell did you answer the question 45 minutes before it was asked?
     
  8. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

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    Some devilry is at work here [​IMG]!
    *Paging conspiracy theorists*
    --
    Holadem
     
  9. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    It was due to HTF's time-machine software that Parker has been working on. The man's a real wizard, I tell you.

    Actually, the software seems to be reading the time/date stamp of the posts and arranging them accordingly, according to local times. I'm sure Parker, as always, will come up with a solution soon.

    As for reading a good popular-level explanation of the mechanisms involved in evolution, any of the late Stephen Jay Gould's excellent books will do. Though not about the mass extinction at the K-T boundarie, Dr. Donald Johannsen's excellent Lucy affords a fascinating glimpse into how paleoanthropology works, as well as an excellent overview of human evolution.
     
  10. Kenneth

    Kenneth Supporting Actor

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  11. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    don't quote me on this, but here goes...

    the dinos were wiped out due to an asteroid. this is pretty well accepted because of the "iridium (sp?) layer".

    this iridium material forms a ring in the earth's crust about the same time the dinos bit it. the thing is...iridium is *not* found naturally on earth. so guess where it is found in abundance? asteroids.

    when that thing hit, it must have been (in every sense of the word) cataclysmic!
     
  12. Danny R

    Danny R Supporting Actor

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    Of course the interesting thing is that after most of the great extinctions of the world (I believe there are 6 major extinction events), there is usually a evolutionary boom where the survivors are filled with new opportunities to multiply and prosper and slowly evolve into a multitude of new species.
     

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