More than one type of connection?

Don K

Agent
Joined
Dec 10, 2001
Messages
26
Just purchased some new equipment and it seems the instructions are saying to make more than one type of connectiion. For instance if you use an optical connection you should also use a composite audio connection. If using HDMI then use analog component with it. I know my receiver will always seach for the highest quality connection first. I went on the net to try and understand this and came across one site saying the reason you use more than one type of connection is in case the source you are using does not support that connection. For instance if you are using digital coax and the source does not support digital then it will revert to the audio analog.


I didn't do this before and didn't seem to have any problem. I just used what ever offered the best connection. It seems redundant and lots of extra cable.
 

Mort Corey

Supporting Actor
Joined
Nov 21, 2003
Messages
981
Not sure if I understand what it is you're trying to connect but from your discription is does sound rather redundant.

Mort
 

Jeff Gatie

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2002
Messages
6,531
The only time I ever saw this type of redundancy necessary is when I had a cable box that did not output digital audio on analog channels. But that was years ago and my current HD box only requires a digital audio cable. However, I'm sure you can scrounge up some old R/W/Y RCA from the ones that came in a box with a DVD player or game console. It wouldn't hurt to use these, but I wouldn't spend anything on them.
 

mylan

Screenwriter
Joined
Jan 6, 2005
Messages
1,705
Or it could be that in order to use the on screen display you would need to use an analog cable. Some receivers do not do OSD through digital/HDMI.
 

Bob McElfresh

Senior HTF Member
Joined
May 22, 1999
Messages
5,182
This is the main reason we used to hook up both analog and digital sound at the same time.

There is 1 other reason to have dual hookups:

Say you run HDMI to the TV. Now the audio and video are produced by the TV. But your TV does not drive your HT receiver. You need to run another digital cable from the TV to your receiver to get the nice 5.1 sound.

You may as well run HDMI to the TV and a coaxial-digital straight to your receiver. Use the TV speakers for casual TV watching. But fire up the HT receiver for more serious movie/TV watching.

Does that make sense?
 

Bob McElfresh

Senior HTF Member
Joined
May 22, 1999
Messages
5,182
Another point: A different post has a user who goes HDMI to the TV, then HDMI from the TV to the HT receiver.

When he switches channels, the video changes instantly, but the sound goes quiet and takes 10-15 seconds before it starts up.

If you run HDMI to the TV, and coaxial-digital straight to the receiver, it would likely not have a delay.
 

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