More Advice Needed - Outdoor Shed Without Floor or Foundation

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Brian Mansure, Sep 12, 2003.

  1. Brian Mansure

    Brian Mansure Second Unit

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    Well I posted last week about getting this shed moved onto my property, which we were able to do but now I need different advice.

    Just recently I "inherited" a 7' X 10' shed from my next door neighboor for free which is great but it's now in my yard just sitting on pavers and the front 2 inches of the shed is touching the ground. I certainly understand why it's not good to have any direct contact with a wooden structure and the ground, so what can I do now?

    Some friends, family and I were able to move the shed (in one piece) where I want it in my yard but because of a time constraint I didn't have enough time to build a proper foundation. The area it's located on now used to be a 7' X 13' picnic area made from concrete pavers.
    Most of the pavers are in good shape (that I can tell) but over the years they have shifted and are not even.
    So the shed has no floor or foundation and it's just sitting on the pavers/ground.

    Please help me figure out the best way to add a sound foundation and floor to this shed.

    I appreciate any and all suggestions.

    Thanks,
    Brian
     
  2. Justin Lane

    Justin Lane Cinematographer

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    Brian,

    If it were me, I would probably just leave the shed on pavers, and make sure the areas in contact with the ground are painted. Another option would be building a pressure treated wooden base to set the shed on.

    Your local codes may differ, but as soon as you pour a concrete foundation for a shed where I live, it then becomes a "permanent" structure and is taxable. The next time your house is reassessed, this free shed will suddenly cost you some extra money out of your pocket every year at tax time.

    J
     
  3. LewB

    LewB Screenwriter

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    How about a level bed of gravel ?
     
  4. Steve Berger

    Steve Berger Supporting Actor

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    Justin is right on track . I'd like to add some additional info. (we've had such a shed on the ground for 15 years , moved once)

    You would probably need a building permit to even put a foundation in for it. A pressure treated frame is pretty easy . Set up some treated 2x4s or 2x6s (rated for ground contact)in the correct shape to match the shed (I assume you can lift and move it since you got it over) and set the shed on the wood - pick the flattest ground you can find. You want to move it for the second step anyway if possible. You should be able to run deck screws (galvanized) down into your new frame. (at an angle from inside and outside if necessary) That should also reinforce the structure a bit also. You could also lift each side in sequence and slide the wood under if you can't move it. You can also coat the treated wood with additional sealer if you want.

    Next you want to remove the pavers that match the circumference so that you can level the dirt so the shed sits flat. Rule-of-thumb -lower the high spots , don't add filler to the low spots. (the wood is rated for ground contact after all) You could of course do all of this with the shed in place by lifting the sides one at a time but it would be quicker if you can move the whole shed.

    Before repositioning the pavers inside your now level shed you should anchor the thing in place unless the wind never blows on it. Drive (with a sledge hammer) some woodden stakes into the ground (treated lumber) inside in the 4 corners as deep as you can. You can then put long deck screws or nails through the stakes into the frame , hopefully keeping your shed in place during adverse weather, ours stayed put when a tornado passed by overhead 200 feet away.

    Good luck , there are of course lots of modifications to these steps that will work too but it is important that it sit firmly level or it will break apart from the stress.
     
  5. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    How about some of those support blocks they use for decks?
    I think I'd pour concrete footings and give the building inspectors the finger :b
     
  6. Brian Mansure

    Brian Mansure Second Unit

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    Thanks for all the replies.

    I actually have a building permit, it was only 6 bucks so I figured that was cheap to keep my neighboors and township happy.

    I'm planning on not moving the entire shed again unless I can do it for free.

    I realize this puts another degree of difficulty into preparing a level foundation but spending too much more incidental money on this project is not something I'm willing or able to do. If I can get even 5 years from this shed with only spending about $200 to move it and fix-it up then it'll be worth it for me.

    Anyhow, my buddy has a "pumpkin" jack that we can use to lift a side at a time and attach treated lumber that way.

    If ya have anymore ideas simple or complicated, please keep them coming.

    Thanks again,
    Brian
     
  7. DaveHo

    DaveHo Supporting Actor

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    My brother-in-law is in the shed business. Any sites that he prepares for the owner are done with a 4-5" base of stone. Shed, which has PT runners, is placed right on top of the stone.

    -Dave
     

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