Mono Mixing

Discussion in 'DVD' started by ScottR, Apr 8, 2005.

  1. ScottR

    ScottR Cinematographer

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    I have a dumb question. When 1-channel mono tracks are converted into 2-channel mono,is it possible for the dvd techs to mix part of the sound lower (i.e. sound effects and music) than the voices? If so, how is this done? Thanks.
     
  2. Jay Pennington

    Jay Pennington Screenwriter

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    No. Once it's mono, it's mono! Everything's in there fused together.

    However, if the DVD producers have separate elements to work with, that's another story. Even in the mono old days, the mixers would often create and preserve a music and effects track (mono) without dialogue, for use in making dubs in other languages.
     
  3. Mark Anthony

    Mark Anthony Second Unit

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    If the source for the mono sound is on a composite track containing dialogue, music and effects, then there's very little you can do apart from use eq to alter it's sound characteristics - you can't really mix it as it's all combined. For example anyone listening to a "chace" remix of material from mono composite, such as the great escape, will see how bad a pseudo 5.1 track from comp mono can sound, compared to a real 5.1 re-mix from multi-track mono dme elements.

    If the source for the mono sound is on seperate tracks - ie for a film if you have the DME elements: a mono dialogue track, mono effects and mono music, then these three elements can be mixed in different ways and then combined - inc lower!

    But if your refering to 2.0 mono on Dolby Digital dvd's, it's just the same mono track sent over two channels rather than 1, presumably to increase the sound bitrate and therefore quality on the dvd.

    M
     
  4. Kevin M

    Kevin M Producer

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  5. ScottR

    ScottR Cinematographer

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    Why is it that when mono films are run on tv in mono, that the sound effects can be heard more clearly?
     
  6. Jay Pennington

    Jay Pennington Screenwriter

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    Some broadcasters prefer to use filters that maintain a constant audio level, no matter what dynamics the source material has. Footsteps become just as loud as explosions.
     
  7. Ed St. Clair

    Ed St. Clair Producer

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    And, explosions become just as loud as footsteps.[​IMG]
     
  8. TedD

    TedD Supporting Actor

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    Because most TV stations hard limit and or compress their audio not to exceed a certain level, except for the commercials which are run anywhere from 3 to 6db higher than normal programming.

    Yet another reason I don't watch commercial television.

    If you want an illustration, and you have an HDTV receiver in your system, try rapidly switching back and forth between the analog channel and the digital channel from the same TV station.

    Ted
     

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