Monitor Resolution Question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jon_W, Feb 13, 2002.

  1. Jon_W

    Jon_W Stunt Coordinator

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    I've had my computer for about a year now and have had the resolution set at 1024 by 768. My monitor is a dell M991 19 inch mointor. I was wondering if I can safely run at a higher resolution than that stated above and if so would you recommed doing so and at what rate. What are the advatages/disadvantages? I don't believe my monitor is one those higher end mulitsync monitors. The manual recommeds a refresh rate of 75hz at 1024 by 768 does it matter what the manual recommeds. Thanks[​IMG]
     
  2. Kimmo Jaskari

    Kimmo Jaskari Screenwriter

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    What is the maximum the manual says it can handle?

    19 inches should be fine for running at 1280x1024, but if the screen is too old to handle that resolution at 75hz or more you probably should stick to 1024. Below 75hz the display flickers and can cause eyestrain.
     
  3. Jon_W

    Jon_W Stunt Coordinator

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    The manual does not say what the max frequecy is, however, I would say it would have to be 75hz since there is no option to change it. The monitor is only one year old so age should not be a factor. I've run it at 1280 by 1024 and saw no flickering .
     
  4. Kimmo Jaskari

    Kimmo Jaskari Screenwriter

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    Basically, a monitor will work fine up to its rated maximum, after which it will stop displaying a picture when you try to change to a higher resolution. If you can get it up to 1280x1024, you can de facto use it at 1280x1024. If it goes up to 1600x1200, that's fine too.

    Aside from that though you need to try to keep the refresh rate at or above 75hz for your eyes sake. Also, some more affordable screens tend to get blurry etc at higher resolutions, but that is something you'll have to decide for yourself, ie if it looks good enough.
     
  5. Andre F

    Andre F Screenwriter

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    Does anyone have any good information on refresh rates? Or could someone explain this a little better? I will move my machines to 75hz! When I use any computer I have to use glasses, maybe this has something to do with it since it's definetely an eye strain issue.

    -Andre F
     
  6. Alan Curry

    Alan Curry Agent

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    From the DELL site:

    Overview:

    ***GREAT VALUE - SIGNIFICANT PRICE REDUCTION ON THIS PRODUCT*** The Dell M991 was designed to accommodate a wide variety of users ranging from home and small offices to large corporate environments. Displaying brilliant images at a maximum resolution of up to 1600x1200 pixels, this monitor is ideal for Microsoft® Windows® , CAD/CAM/CAE, desktop publishing, spreadsheets, internet browsing, and any other application that demands large screen size and high resolutions. Those who require exceptional quality and reliability at an affordable price will appreciate the value that the Dell M991 delivers. Now, get a 3 year Limited Warranty on Dell-branded monitors through Dell! No additional cost for this extended limited warranty.

    Tech Specs:

    Screen Size: 19 IN

    Viewable Size: 18 IN

    Pitch Size: 0.26 mm

    Maximum Resolution: 1600 x 1200 PIXELS

    Maximum Horizontal Scan Rate: 96 KHZ

    Maximum Vertical Scan Rate: 160 HZ

    Minimum Horizontal Scan Rate: 30 KHZ

    Minimum Vertical Scan Rate: 50 HZ

    Monitor Connectors: 15- pin D-sub

    Shipping Weight (pounds): 50.7 LBS

    PNP: Standard Feature

    Weight (pounds): 44 LBS

    Depth in " centimeters": 17.2 IN

    Height in (inches): 17.6 IN

    Width in Inches: 17.3 IN

    Product Highlights:

    Deflection angle 90°

    Phosphor type P22, medium short persistence

    Faceplate coating Anti-glare, anti-static

    Video input signals analog, 0.7 Vpp, positive at 75 ohm

    Synchronization input signals separate horizontal and vertical; TTL level, positive or negative

    AC input voltage / frequency1 00-240 VAC ± 10% (90 - 264VAC) / 60-50Hz (47-53Hz)

    AC input current 1.6 A max.

    Inrush current at 120V 25 A

    Inrush current at 240 V 34 A

    Compatibility This product has been tested and validated on Dell systems to ensure it will work with your computer.

    Technical Support Supported by Dell Technical Support when used with a Dell system.

    Usually ships within 5 business days.
     
  7. Iain Lambert

    Iain Lambert Screenwriter

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    Are you running Windows or Linux? If its Windows, just go into the image settings and select a higher resolution. Monitors are of the 'it works or it doesn't' school; if you get a stable picture then you're fine. The only caveat about Linux is that it can be persuaded to do nasty things (but only with some effort there). Its not something you'd do by accident unless you're REALLY playing with fire in the config files.

    (edit, just seen that wonderfully informative update. If the monitor can do 1600x1200 at all, then it will be nice and solid at 1280x960 for you.
     
  8. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
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    A one year old 19" monitor will easily run at 1600x1200 (and look good too); assuming your video card supports that.

    As another said, in Windows, go to the Display controls panel, Settings, and slide the "Resolution" slider so it goes higher. All the plug-and-play stuff will automatically select the scan rates, etc. That is, the drivers for the monitor provide Windows with the info about its max res, etc.
     
  9. Jon_W

    Jon_W Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for the info Alan. I actually did try both the American and Canadian Dell sites but for some reaaon I could not find the specs for the M991. I guess I should have tried a little harder. I am running Windows ME so the Linus thing should not be a problem.
    I hope this doesn't sound like a stupid question but what are the advantages to going to a higher resolution? Will things simply look better? And what configurations do most of you have. Do you run it at say 1024 by 1268 with windows set to large font or extra large, etc?
    Thanks for the replies:[​IMG]
     
  10. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
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    There was a Poll about this recently [​IMG]
    Increased Resolution has two main benefits:
    * Better looking pictures, images, fonts, etc.
    * More screen "real estate" allowing you to see more of your document/spreadsheet/picture that you're working on
    Same thing for scanners, digital cameras and printers:
    * Scanners: higher resolution (scans at 300 dpi, 600 dpi, 1200 dpi, etc) means finer image details are "seen" and captured. Better quality images result.
    * Dig. Cameras: more pixels (1 Mega-pixel, 3 Mega-pixel, etc) provides more image detail in a picture
    * Printers: higher printer resolution (300 dpi, 600 dpi, etc) means higher quality print; easier to read text.
    Personally, I believe in using the highest resolution possible on my monitor. At home, I'm running a 17" monitor at 1600x1200. I increased the font size for all system fonts, and use "Large Icons" and everything is nice and readable. Windows doesn't cope with custom font sizes perfectly, so some few things don't display quite right. But in general, text is easier to read than if I use a lower resolution e.g. 1024x768, because I've got more detailed fonts, and so they are even more text-like.
    Try it, you might like it! [​IMG]
     
  11. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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    You get more desktop real estate: more room for toolbars and palettes. You can see more of your document or picture or video at once, or even two side-by-side, which a lot of people that do stuff professionally do -- publishing, graphics, etc.

    Everything will be smaller, which will make it subjectively "sharper", up to the point where it gets too small to see. I would certainly try it for a while and get used to it before deciding if you really like it.

    If you have to use large fonts, I would say that's too small. Large fonts sometimes throw off other things too.

    I encounter a variety of monitor sizes during the day, and each has a different purpose and resolution; e.g. 1152x864 at 15", 1600x1200 at 21", and 1920x1200 at 24" (widescreen)

    Note that 1280x1024 is not 4:3 like most resolutions, but is instead 5:4. If you use this resolution and adjust the monitor to fill the screen, the image will be slightly distorted -- squares are not square, circles are oval. This bothers some people.

    //Ken
     
  12. Kimmo Jaskari

    Kimmo Jaskari Screenwriter

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    As for refresh rate and why that is important - what it means is basically how quickly the screen will flicker. Even though a CRT screen may look like it emits a steady glow, infact it does flicker. It just does it so fast you can't tell, in most cases.

    60hz means it flickers 60 times per second, 75 means 75 times per second. An accepted norm for what is minimum and comfortable is 75hz, you really don't want to go below that. 85hz or even higher is preferrable.

    Personally I can clearly see a CRT screen flicker at 60hz and find it quite objectionable to work on one. I'd rather take a lower resolution and a higher refresh rate any day.
     
  13. Jason Handy

    Jason Handy Second Unit

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  14. AjayM

    AjayM Screenwriter

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    Go with what you are comfortable with. At home on a 19" I run 1024x768 at 100Hz, because I usually lean back and relax at the computer so I'm further away from the screen. At work I have a 21" monitor, and I run 1280x1024 at 100Hz, but that's because I sit closer to the monitor.

    Pay very careful attention to refresh rates, higher is almost always better. Having to low a refresh rate is one of the biggest causes of eye fatigue (headaches, sore eyes, etc), you may not see the flicker but could still be effected by it.

    Windows is great in the respect of choosing the best setup, you can go to Dell and download the "monitor drivers" for your monitor, and between that and the video card information it will not let you choose something the monitor can't do. So in consumer Windows (95/98/ME) you can select the resolution you want, then go choose the highest refresh rate you can and be done with it. In Win2k it's even nicer, under the Adapter tab you can see all the modes that your combo will do, so pick the resolution and refresh rate you want and you are set. If Dell doesn't have the information, you can use the information above to "guestimate" monitor modes, but you can also experiment, a 1yr old monitor will have protection built into it so it won't damage itself.

    Lastly, those Dell monitors aren't that bad, I have a few of them in the office, and they are very good considering the "included price" in the system.

    Andrew
     

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