Money Allocation

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mat_M, Jan 27, 2003.

  1. Mat_M

    Mat_M Stunt Coordinator

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    Is there a rule of thumb with the ratios of money spent on
    speakers+sub to money spent on pre/pro+amps? I know it's
    obvious you don't want to go spend $5G's on a pre/pro+amp
    and then spend only $1000 bucks on 5 or 7 speakers; what
    do you guys think?

    Mat
     
  2. Joseph_W

    Joseph_W Stunt Coordinator

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    Mat,
    I asked a similar question long ago and nobody really wanted to go out and answer it. I agree, there is no answer, but I'll take a stab. I have spent the same on my pre/pro and 5 channel amp as I did on my front three speakers. And I plan to keep this configuration for awhile. Spending much more on one or the other is very reasonable if you have an upgrade in mind.

    Hope this helps.

    Joe
     
  3. Leo_P

    Leo_P Second Unit

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    I have a 50/50 ratio going. I paid around $4k for my Anthem pre/pro and Rotel amp, then another $4k for my B&W CDM 9NT's, with matching center and surrounds. I didn't think about a ratio when I started shopping, but this 50/50 works for me. I'm in audio heaven.[​IMG] But, I think if you're going to spend more on something, it should be the speakers.
    IMO, a Circuit City-style receiver coupled with some high-end speakers would sound better than expensive separates pushing Radio Shack speakers. Just my $.02. Who knows, I could be right.[​IMG]
     
  4. John S Choi

    John S Choi Agent

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    I would spend 60% on speakers and source(cd or dac)
    40% on pre/pro or receiver
    I tend to change pre/pro or receiver more than speakers.
     
  5. Rick_FL

    Rick_FL Stunt Coordinator

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    speakers are definitely a higher priority, since I know a lot of ppl who have had the same speakers for 20yrs. They are in general a very long-term investment..and of course no amount of receiver is worth a hill of beans if you don't have good speakers
     
  6. Adam.Gonsman

    Adam.Gonsman Stunt Coordinator

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    Thought I'd weigh in too. I started with a 80/20 ratio of speakers to receiver. The system didn't sound terrible, but the speakers were far from their potential. I have since bought a new receiver which shifts the ratio more to 60/40. This seems a much better balance. The receiver is MUCH better able to do justice to the speakers.

    I think there is definately a line where the best speakers in the world are a waste if they're coupled with a cheap enough receiver, but I also have to agree with the above that the speakers are a much better long term investment. My feeling is when on a budget, spend whatever you can on speakers to have just enough left over for **something** to drive them and upgrade the receiver later.

    It probably also bears mentioning that as a whole, good electronics are getting much cheaper. It is much cheaper and easier to produce a reasonable quality receiver than it used to be. The price to quality curve on the elctronics seems to be very logorithmic. That is, past a certain point, it costs a great deal of money to improve the electronics just a little more cause the cheap ones are already so good. But speakers have not seen the same price drop in parts. When you start talking about mica injected or carbon fiber or kevlar cones, you start talking about more and more money.

    The sound difference you hear from $1000 mains and $1500 mains will almost certainly be bigger than the difference you hear from a $1000 receiver and a $1500 receiver on either of those mains.

    A good set of speakers can last you a lifetime (or until you win the lottery). Your receiver will only really last a couple years till Dolby comes out with yet another sound format. But when settling in to a given set of equipment and not anticipating an upgrade to accomidate a budget, the 60/40 and 50/50 ratios both seem right in line.
     
  7. Mat_M

    Mat_M Stunt Coordinator

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    Ok one more thing...And this is my fault for not being specific: the ratios you guys are giving; are those for speakers to pre/pro ONLY? or speakers to pre/pro+amp? Should I assume that since most of you are suggesting the speakers are more of the long term purchase, the amp with them will be long term also?

    So for example:
    Pre/pro: Outlaw 950 $899
    Speakers: Polk Audio LSiFX, LSi9, LSiC, LSi7 for about $2200
    Which gives me about a 70/30 speaker to pre/pro ratio

    or

    Pre/pro+amp: Outlaw 950/770 $2500
    Same speakers
    Which gives me about 47/53 speaker to pre/pro+amp ratio

    Cheers,
    Mat
     
  8. Adam.Gonsman

    Adam.Gonsman Stunt Coordinator

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    In my case, the ratio is for a receiver and speakers. When talking a pre/pro and amp, I think the ratio probably holds about the same pre/pro and amp to speakers since typically the move to pre/pro and amp is probably somewhat parallel to a move to bigger/better speakers.

    As for long term investments, if you're running seperates, the amp is definately a long term investment on par with the speakers. A good amp now will be a good amp 5 years from now.

    I think there's another interesting question though in what you're saying. For those of you running seperates, is there a perticular ratio of pre/pro to amp cost? Is one of those more important sink big money in than the other?
     
  9. Raymond D'amato

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    THE OLD RULE OF THUMB WAS. Spend double on the speakers
    than on the electronics.This was told to me by
    a gentleman who I used to work for by the name of bill hecht
    we mfg. all the speaker systems for fisher radio.
     
  10. Craig_Kg

    Craig_Kg Supporting Actor

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    Spending your money unevenly about your system components helps you join the upgrade spiral [​IMG]
     
  11. Joseph_W

    Joseph_W Stunt Coordinator

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  12. Rich Wenzel

    Rich Wenzel Supporting Actor

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    for me i spent 45%-50% my budget on speakers, and the other half on pre/pro, dvd player, tv, etc.

    my original system was:
    B&W605S2 two pairs
    B&W LCR6S2
    Panasonic PT-56WX51
    Carver C1000a (I got that at 750 or so brand new, i had a friend who got it for me at cost)
    Denon DVD 1600

    Total cost was $3800 or so on everything that was not speakers, and $3600 on the speakers.

    I wish I spent another $1000 on the speakers and kept the same system. I would have gotten 2 pairs of N805's then, and only been 4 channel. When I would have been ready to upgrade, i would have gotten a pair of N803's and gone 6 channel, or stayed 4 channel and moved the other pair to another room.

    Rich
     
  13. Mike_Ch

    Mike_Ch Stunt Coordinator

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    Generally, I would put more money into the speakers than into the amp/receiver/pre-pro. Speaker technology is relatively static, and a good sounding speaker now will still remain a good sounding speaker in a few years time. The same is not true for electronics (in particular pre-pros and the ever-changing sound formats). However, don't get pressured into "I must spend 50% on speakers and 50% on electronics and the change on zipcord" mantra, and go with what sounds best to you. Set a budget, and have a listen to systems that your dealers recommend that fit this budget, and pick one that sounds best.

    FWIW, I will soon be using a $4800 cd player with $1000 speakers :b . So YMMV.

    Cheers,
    Mike
     

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