Modified disclaimer

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Greg_M, Feb 3, 2002.

  1. Greg_M

    Greg_M Screenwriter

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    Caught a film on tv the other day. before it began there was a disclaimer - "This film has been modified to fit your television screen"

    At first, I found this misleading. I though, ok they shrunk the picture so that the horizontal image would fill the screen, then I realized it's gonna be Pan & Scan.

    I guess better phrasing, and a better way to educate the viewer, would be to say "since the picture you are about to see is wider than your tv screen, we've chopped off the left and right sides of the picture"

    or

    "since the picture you are about to see is wider than your tv screen, you will only be viewing 40% of it"

    or

    Maybe they could just show the wide image and then demonstrate how the film is being changed.
     
  2. Martin Fontaine

    Martin Fontaine Supporting Actor

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    What they should do (In case of a Dual-Sided OAR/P&S disk):

    P&S:

    "This movie has been modified from it's original aspect ratio for uneducated morons who believe that the picture is supposed to fill their screen, if you want to see the movie the way the director intended, flip the disk over."

    WS:

    "This movie is presented in it's original aspect ratio, black bars at the top and bottom are totally normal and necessary to show the entire picture the way the director intended. If that bothers you, flip the disk over and watch the butchered version."
     
  3. rutger_s

    rutger_s Supporting Actor

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    Actually, I think a more polite approach would be better.

    Something like...

    "This film is intended to be seen in a wide format but has been modified to fill your screen. It has also been edited for content and to fit the allotted time slot"

    for TV.

    While for video...

    "This film is intended to be seen in a wide format but has modified to fill your screen."

    Calling people "uneducated morons" in a disclaimer on any product is not a good thing.

    On a side note, I notice that some people yell and scream their point across when it comes to widescreen. I always politely explain the benefits of widescreen to people rather than reducing them to "uneducated morons."
     
  4. Sean Moon

    Sean Moon Cinematographer

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    No...the problem is the word "modified" The word itself sounds like a change is being made for the better, like modifying your car or computer.

    The word should be "ALTERED", which is what is really happening, and has a negative sound to it. If someone read that "this film has been altered" the first thing that comes to mind is negativity.

    Here is an example. Lets change the wording from this line from Empire Strikes Back

    Original" I am altering the deal, pray I dont alter it any further"

    Sounds like Vader isnt messing around, and put Lando in his place.

    Now here is the same line sugarcoated

    "I am modifying the deal, pray I dont modify it any further"

    IT almost sounds like a good thing there.

    So that is why I believe only one word should be changed.
     
  5. rutger_s

    rutger_s Supporting Actor

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    Is this better:
    "This film is intended to be seen in a wide format but has been altered to fill your screen. It has also been re-edited for content and to fit the allotted time slot"
    Now two words that are sometimes misleading have been modified for your enjoyment.
    [​IMG]
     
  6. Kevin P

    Kevin P Screenwriter

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  7. Gil Clark

    Gil Clark Extra

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    My major problem is with the "fill your screen" part. To those with a widescreen tv, this is absolutely false.
     
  8. bill lopez

    bill lopez Second Unit

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    This movie is a rectanglur frame like it was shown at the movies. In order to make it fit your square t.v. it will zoom in to show only the center of the movie to fill your t.v. screen.[​IMG]
     
  9. Glenn Overholt

    Glenn Overholt Producer

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    Drat! Gil beat me to it. I was thinking that if any WS owner saw that message on TV, they could contact the station and tell them that they lied.

    Glenn
     
  10. Greg_M

    Greg_M Screenwriter

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    Actually guys, I'm being serious. I would guess most people don't relaize the left and right third of the picture is missing when veiwed on television.

    There must be a better disclaimer which will get the point across. (Unless tv stations don't want viewer to know which way the film has been altered - which may be the case)

    I guess it would be better to demonstrate the process of cutting off the sides when showing a letterboxed film so people will at least understand why the black bars are there.
     
  11. rutger_s

    rutger_s Supporting Actor

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    Actually it depends on how the film was shot. Some films do not remove the excess sides of a frame.

    Some films were shot full-frame and matted for theatrical and widescreen presentations. These films are then unmatted for television and full-screen VHS presentations.

    How about this for TV:

    "This presentation is intended to be viewed in a wide format. Due to the nature of most televisions, this format has been altered to fill a standard television. This may result in loss of picture information or the unintended viewing of extra picture information. This presentation has also been cleaned up for content and edited to fit the alloted time slot."

    Have a narrator read off the disclaimer before a movie begins on TV.

    Use the same thing for VHS but loose the last sentence so it looks like this:

    "This presentation is intended to be viewed in a wide format. Due to the nature of most televisions, this format has been altered to fill a standard television. This may result in loss of picture information or the unintended viewing of extra picture information."

    Again have a narrator read off the disclaimer.
     

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