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Modern Jazz Guitarist

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Dave Morton, Jan 2, 2003.

  1. Dave Morton

    Dave Morton Supporting Actor

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    I'm looking for some recommendations on modern jazz guitarists. Been really into Joe Pass and just picked up "Great Guitars" with Charlie Byrd, Barney Kessel, and Herb Ellis. Are there any outstanding jazz guitar players such as these guys that have some current CD's? Any ideas would be great. I just love listening to those others play but would really like to get into some current music and seeing them perform on stage, if possible.
     
  2. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    Andy Summers - pick up any jazz CD that he's made. His latest is a brilliant tribute to Monk called "Green Chimneys".
    John Scofield - I like his stuff. Not as good as Andy Summers but very good.
     
  3. James RD

    James RD Supporting Actor

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    John McLean - look for his debut album "Easy Go" from 2001. It's one of my favorites. He also played with Patricia Barber on "Cafe Blue", "Modern Cool" and "Companion".

    This guy is really good.
     
  4. Richard Travale

    Richard Travale Producer

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    Pat Metheny
     
  5. John Scofield, Pat Metheny, Charlie Hunter is awesome.
     
  6. Vic_T

    Vic_T Stunt Coordinator

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    I would second Andy Summers and recommend his "Peggy's Blue Skylight" CD as well. I think it would be great if he put out a live DVD! He only plays on the coasts and it would give many more people a chance to see his band play live.
     
  7. Greg_Y

    Greg_Y Screenwriter

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    Bill Frisell
    Charlie Hunter
     
  8. Rachael B

    Rachael B Producer

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    Lee Ritenour's FEEL THE NIGHT is one of his better albums. Highly recommended! The Anthony Wilson (he's the guitarist) Trio's OUR GANG is excellent. It's available on Hybrid SACD and Redbook. It's very laid back unlike his earlier neo-swing album. He jazzes up the Beatles' I WANT YOU (she's so heavy) and I think the other selections are original. Highly recommended! Peter White's GLOW is nice. It's maybe a little pop-ish? It's enjoyable for me though. Any of the James Taylor Quartet's (a different guy from Sweet Baby James) albums would be good. He's been dubbed "acid jazz"...not by me. That's about all I can think of at the moment. Best wishes!
     
  9. Mike Broadman

    Mike Broadman Producer

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  10. PaulHeroy

    PaulHeroy Stunt Coordinator

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    Dave, Joe Pass is definitely one of the great masters of jazz guitar. I was fortunate to see him a few years before he died, before I really knew how great he was. I'd like to recommend a couple of guitarists; one of Pass's vintage who is still around, and one younger guy.
    Pat Martino is a legend on jazz guitar who has one of the oddest but most inspiring stories. He got started in the 60's with organist Jack McDuff and others in a funky/soul jazz vein and then started leading his own record dates. He started branching out musically and incorporated some Eastern/Indian influences. But around the late 70's he had a brain aneurysm which caused him to forget how to play guitar. He spent several years re-learning his instrument, and briefly emerged again in the late 80's before starting to solidly play and record again in the mid 90's.
    Recommendations: El Hombre or East! (1967/68), Live at Yoshi's (2001)
    Randy Johnston doesn't have as great a story but he's been making a bunch of solid records over the last 10-15 years, in a mainstream bop/funky style.
    Recommendations: Riding the Curve
    A few other folks I like: Steve Masakowski (Direct AXEcess), Joshua Breakstone (Let's Call This Monk), Philip Catherine (Live), Dave Stryker (Blue To the Bone).
    I'll also second the Anthony Wilson mention; though he's as much of a composer/bandleader as guitarist. I really liked his record Goat Hill Junket with a large ensemble.
     
  11. John Watson

    John Watson Screenwriter

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    I've put some of these names on a shopping list.
    Like Dave, most of mine are "older", or have a very mellow tone, and I've assumed jazz guitars in recent years are more rock influenced - with blistering lines favored?
    Looking forward to trying some though.
    BTW, I just heard a short Bill Frisell track on the radio a few minutes ago, from the FINDING FORRESTER cd.
    I have a Joshua Breakstone cd where he does some Ventures tunes, like Walk Dont Run, and several Pat Martino re-releases.
    Still think I might like that Woody Allen movie about the guitarist, but that would be more Django Rheinhardt style I guess [​IMG]
     
  12. PaulHeroy

    PaulHeroy Stunt Coordinator

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    Well, there are certainly some great jazz guitarists who have a "rockier" and more electric sound, and I didn't really go that route in my recommendations since Pass is almost the antithesis of that. Scofield of course is one of the greats there; for a while he was doing more straight jazz oriented stuff in his quartet with Joe Lovano, but his work lately has gotten back to his earlier funky stuff. Then you have guys like John Abercrombie, John McLaughlin, Mike Stern, Larry Coryell, Bireli Lagrene who have done some seriously scorching electric stuff, but can swim in a variety of musical streams.
     
  13. PaulHeroy

    PaulHeroy Stunt Coordinator

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    On Bill Frisell... I started to mention him in my earlier post but he's a subject all his own! The guy is a genius, IMO, and one of the handful of current folks who can measure up as one of the "giants".

    Frisell is a guy who I consider similar to Thelonious Monk, in that he has such a distinct and personal style that it's hard to classify him as being part of any specific movement. He's also different from Monk though in that he's played in several very different musical styles, from "downtown" out jazz with John Zorn, Tim Berne and Vernon Reid (Smash and Scatteration, Zorn's Naked City and Cobra plus a bunch of other stuff in the mid-late 80's) to "Americana" (This Land), country/bluegrass flavor (Nashville), boppy but ethereal jazz (his work with drummer Paul Motian). And he plays on Norah Jones wonderful recent record. He's amazing in having such a broad range of contexts yet you can always identify him.
     

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