Mixing parts of music on my pc.

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by ChrisHeflen, Feb 24, 2006.

  1. ChrisHeflen

    ChrisHeflen Supporting Actor

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    I am not very savy when it comes to computers, but was wondering if there was a way I could take segments of a song and put it with another segment of another song.
    For example, there are some good instrumental parts of songs in like the middle or the end and I would like to take that part and add it to another one. Build it kind of, and then burn it to disc.
    I guess kind of dj'ing in a way, but on a more elementary level.
    I have acid player shockwave something on my pc that might do this, but I can't ever figure it out.

    Is there some software I can buy that does this?
     
  2. Andrew Chong

    Andrew Chong Supporting Actor

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    As long as this is just for personal use, there are many ways to do this.

    This is one free way that first occurred to me:
    Presuming you have the bits already saved to your hard drive, use free tracker software (more info for newbies).

    This type of software is normally used to make one's own music using audio files (mind you, you don't even necessarily have to know music theory to create music this way, but you'll of course usually get better results if you do know), however, it's also quite a bit simpler to achieve what you're trying to do.

    If you're interested, read the provided link.
     
  3. Randy Tennison

    Randy Tennison Screenwriter

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    There is tons of software to buy out there that will allow you to edit mp3's. I used Audacity for editing. It's very good, and free.

    I've also used Adobe's Audition, however, it's a bit more pricey.
     
  4. Daren Welsh

    Daren Welsh Supporting Actor

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    So is a "tracker" a simplified sequencer? I'd recommend software like Fruity Loops, Reason, Ableton Live, Cubase, ... I'm sure there are free ones, too. I just haven't looked into it.
     
  5. Andrew Chong

    Andrew Chong Supporting Actor

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    From The Mod archive with some clarifications by me:
    "Tracker, (noun): a software tool to create music. The musician gathers a few audio files ("samples") like drums, flute etc. and then types note values into patterns, just as if he were drawing notes on a piece of paper. The notes, along with the pitch, contain additional data: the previously loaded instrument they should be played with, the note's volume and sometimes some extra information for effects [such as echo, portamento (sliding pitch from one note to the next), stereo placement, etc.]. [This pattern model is akin to Fruity Loops mentioned by Daren]

    The musician can arrange notes on different [multiple] channels [multiple tracks], which are played simultaneously. The tracker software will create a "resulting sound" (hopefully a song [[​IMG]]) when reading the pattern data containing the notes, rather than playing a preset sound like a WAV or MP3 file.
    ...
    "Most tracker programs have very similar layouts and user interfaces. This is great, because learning to use different trackers is much easier than e.g. switching between word processors."


    Yes, Fruity Loops, Reason, Ableton Live, and Cubase are all great software. Some easier to pick up than others. You can do a whole lot more with these pieces of (sometimes pricy) software and tracker software than DJ-type work. For instance, many well-regarded artists such as Liam Howlett of Prodigy now use Reason to produce albums.

    I just remembered another piece of software if you want to spend money: Steinberg's Traktor DJ. It's a software DJ mixer with two sound sources. (more info in a brief review)
     
  6. Daren Welsh

    Daren Welsh Supporting Actor

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    Andrew is right on. I hadn't heard of tracker software, but like he says, it depends on how large these portions of songs are that you'd like to mix. If you're cutting short samples, then use a sequencer or tracker. If you're looking to mix larger portions of songs together like a DJ would, but digitally, then I think Tracktor is one good option. I've never used it, but have heard many mixes from people who have used it and they typically do a good job of blending and transitioning.

    You may be able to find additional help at Audio Mastermind.

    This or this or this may be of use. Again, I haven't tried these out yet, just passing on options.
     
  7. ChrisHeflen

    ChrisHeflen Supporting Actor

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    I have Acid on my computer, but could never figure it out. I tried again last nite.

    What I would like to do is you know how like some songs just have a cool instrumental bridge or something. I would like to cut it out and then paste it to like another bridge of a song. I am moslty into electronic music and I can't stand when there is singing. So I would like to cut out the verses or something. This is just for fun and nothing serious, and since none of my friends like this genere, it will be striclty for fun and for the car.

    Thanks for the ideas and stuff. I did try Audacity, but couln't figure it out. I guess I am gonna have to read forever to figure anything out.
     
  8. Daren Welsh

    Daren Welsh Supporting Actor

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    Essentially, you're trying to do what the very first DJ did -- extend the breaks to create a new flow of music (albeit digitally instead of using turntables and a mixer). Just keep toying around with the programs and you should figure it out. There may be tutorials either online or in bookstores to help you. A friend of mine got Reason and a tutorial on CD to get him started. There's bound to be other tutorials out there.

    If you end up putting something together, give us a link to check it out.
     

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