Mitsubishi Warning Labels

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jim_Hunt, Jun 20, 2002.

  1. Jim_Hunt

    Jim_Hunt Extra

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    I see the Mitsubishi RPTVs carry a warning label suggesting you limit your viewing of images which cause black bars more than 20% of the time.

    Wide Screen (16X9) or Normal (4X3) both had the warnings on them. Do the other brands carry the same problem but without the warning?

    I messed with several stretch modes on the 16X9 and I didn't like them. Will I kill every RPTV watching 4X3 without it being stretched?

    I promise to calibrate the unit properly and take it out of Torch Mode as soon as I get it home.
     
  2. Gabriel_Lam

    Gabriel_Lam Screenwriter

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    All CRT based units have this limitation to some degree, some manufacturers are just more upfront about it. Taking it off of torch mode definitely helps though, smart move.
     
  3. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    Mits is mainly concerned with those who don't take the set off "torch mode."

    I watched countless letterboxed dvds on an analog 4/3 rptv for 2 years with no burn in, but there was plenty of 4/3 stuff mixed in.

    I don't know if HD-ready sets are more susceptible to burn in than analog models. I don't worry about the black bars on 2:35 movies.

    I have a widescreen set now and to be on the safe side I use one of the stretch modes for all but critical viewing of movies that were OAR at 1:33. I use variable stretch for the news and most sitcoms, zoom for most tv dramas as they are mostly shot with 16/9 in mind anyway.

    Sony, Toshiba, and Pioneer all have much better stretch modes than the Mits, as well as better line doublers.
     
  4. Jim FC

    Jim FC Stunt Coordinator

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    The difference is that the typical 2.35:1 movie, leaving smaller black bars along the top and bottom, lasts 90 minutes-2 hours; with correct contrast and brightness settings, that's no problem, especially if once the movie's done you turn on something that fills the screen and let that play a half hour or so, to kind of 'cool off' the TV. But people tend to leave their TVs on CNN or ESPN News (or Grand Turismo) or whatever all day long, and if left in 4:3 mode even for one day, burn-in can be an issue.
     

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