Mits 55711 Contrast Adj Question?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by lrtrees, Nov 24, 2002.

  1. lrtrees

    lrtrees Auditioning

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    Hi all. I am hoping some of you might be able to help me in adjusting the contrast. I have purchased the SOUND & VISION HTT software. I'm sure I will have more questions, but I know from reading this and other boards that contrast must be turned down. I am viewing the contrast screen on the tv from a Panasonic RP-56 in progressive mode. With the test screen displayed there are about 5 boxes stacked vertically with colors ranging from gray to white. The narrative says to adjust contrast so that the separation between the top two boxes just appears. Adjust down from full scale to prevent blooming. But when I try to do this, I always have separation, no matter how high or low the contrast. Am I doing something wrong? I should add that the the tv is only a few days old. Will this make a difference? I know I have read that you need to wait until you have some hours on the set to have it calibrated, but not sure if this is what I'm running into now?
    Thanks for your help and suggestions.

    Lon
     
  2. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    I don't have that particular disc, but AVIA and VE both have the same pattern.

    These patterns are a bit confusing, and different people have different opinions on how to use them. Usually they're designed to give you a maximum allowable setting (just below where "blooming" is supposed to occur). The problem is that most modern sets won't bloom at all yet the highest setting is still way too high for long tube life and accurate picture.

    What I do is turn contrast down until the top box turns noticeably gray, then back up until it just turns true white.
    This is the minimum setting and the one I use for serious movie watching in a low ambient light. I usually store a couple of progressively higher contrast settings under different picture modes for times when I have to watch in a more brightly lit room.

    It's perfectly ok to do one of these user calibrations with a disc like yours or VE or AVIA with a brand new set--won't hurt a thing. As the set breaks in, things will change so you'll find yourself redoing it periodically over the first month or 3. These adjustments are done in the user menu and you're not doing anything permanent to the set when you do them.

    You do want to wait until the set is fully broken in before having a professional calibration done, as this involves service menu settings and often physical focussing and such which you don't want to pay to have repeated any time soon. Most of these adjustments are permanent to the extent that you as the user can't accurately redo them. This is why you want the set to be fully settled before having an ISF calibration done.
     
  3. lrtrees

    lrtrees Auditioning

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    Thanks for the reply Steve. When I get home tonight I will try this. I just could not see what the disk said I should be seeing and thought I was doing something wrong. If I might I have another question for you. When I make these changes, in my case the DVD is connected to Comp 1, I am only adjusting for this input. How do I make these same changes for the other inputs, ant A, ant C, input 1, etc since the DVD is only hooked up to one input? Sorry, I am new to this and that may be a dumb question.
    I guess the next thing I should check is the focusing. From what I read it looks as though I should check the manual focus first which I think is the actual lens focusing and then the electrostatic focusing which is the trim pots behind the front panel on my tv. But don't play with the screen trim pots or the BLUE focus pot. Does this sound correct?
    Sorry, I got a little long winded here.
    Thanks,
    Lon
     
  4. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    Lon,

    I'm pretty sure the Mits sets store separate settings for each input, so anything you do on the Comp 1 input that your player is connected to won't apply to the other inputs. If the settings show up onscreen as a percentage or bar graph, you could try duplicating them on your other inputs.

    I don't know what your level of proficiency is, but unless you already have experience with mechanical focus or even service menu settings it might not be a good idea to attempt to adjust these yourself. It's way too easy to mess things up and voids your warranty.

    At the very least, when it comes to mechanical focussing, it would be best to have a copy of your set's service manual and be very confident in your ability to make adjustments. Even changing the wrong thing in service menus can actually disable or damage the set.

    I have a Sony KP57HW40, on which I've done a couple of simple service menu tweaks, but only after doing a lot of research here and at other forums to assure myself of what I was doing and that there was no chance of damaging the set. I do have a service manual for the set, but don't really feel comfortable enough with my abilities (and the translation of Japanese to English in the manual) to attempt manual focus.

    I have messed with trimpots on a couple of Hitachis, and can verify from my own bad experience that messing with the screen pots is a no-no; they're way too sensitive and not what you're supposed to adjust for grayscale anyway.

    As for the focus pots, I've never messed with those.

    My advice, which admittedly isn't worth much, is to start with the user controls and your calibration disc, go very slowly when you get to the service menu if you feel the need to, and don't mess with physical adjustments or trimpots at all unless you're a professional technician or feel very adventurous.
     

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