Missing picture in anamorphic mode?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Greg Hersh, Oct 3, 2002.

  1. Greg Hersh

    Greg Hersh Auditioning

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    I have a Toshiba SD-2107 (1st generation) DVD player hooked up to a Philips 34" widescreen 34PW9817 with an S-Video cable. The DVD player is setup to indicate that it is hooked to a 16x9 device.

    I have the television set to "Widescreen" mode while watching anamorphically encoded movies. Everything was great until I watched "The Royal Tannenbaums". There is a scene where a letter is being read aloud, and the text is subtitled onto the screen. In the word "life", the "l" was missing from the picture! I changed the setting on the television to "4x3", and sure enough, the "l" could be seen (although scrunched up).

    Please tell me that an anamorphic transfer doesn't crop the left and right sides of the picture. I don't want to have to setup the DVD player to tell it I'm hooked up to a 4:3 device and have to "zoom in" on the picture to utilize the widescreen.

    Any help is greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Bill Slack

    Bill Slack Supporting Actor

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    Sounds like you just have a problem with overscan. If you can find the method for accessing the service menu on your TV it should be easy to adjust the image width to fix the problem.
     
  3. Greg Hersh

    Greg Hersh Auditioning

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    Can someone point me in the right direction for finding out how to access the service menu, and perhaps a brief explaniation of overscan? How do I know what settings to change and what to change them to?
     
  4. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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    I would recommend caution in dealing with the service menu unless you know exactly what you're doing. You can easily mess up your picture in a way that only a professional technician will know how to fix (I speak from experience).

    Some amount of overscan is unavoidable in consumer TVs. And it's often desireable. If you had a TV with zero overscan, you'd be amazed at the garbage that gets hidden at the edge of cable, satellite and OTA broadcasts.

    M.
     
  5. Keith Outhouse

    Keith Outhouse Stunt Coordinator

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    I have the same set. I displayed the overscan test pattern on Video Essentials and noticed quite a bit of overscan and a little bit of off centering. I'll probably get mine ISF'd to fix things up.

    The code for the service menu is 062596 then press either the info or the guide+ button. I only enter the menu to see the hours on the set and have no clue how to actually make any adjustments. There are TONS of parameters! Use EXTREME caution if you decide to try anything. Write all setting values down first.

    BTW I think you need to be in the TV tuner mode to do this. As you key in the numbers the channels will change. This is normal.
     
  6. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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  7. Kurt_U

    Kurt_U Agent

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    You shouldn't have to go all the way to 4:3 to view the "l" (rest of the picture). Did you try the 14:9 settion? It should give you the full shot and only have a small letterbox shown.

    I just got the 34pw9847 and this seems to work with it.
     
  8. Greg Hersh

    Greg Hersh Auditioning

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    Yes, but if I put the TV in 14:9 mode, all it is doing is blowing up the 4:3 image.... it is still not being displayed correctly, because the source is anamorphically enhanced.

    I am guessing that I'll need to get the TV ISF calibrated to correct overscan problems.
     

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