Minimizing bass transfer to rest of house

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Ed Auth, Nov 3, 2003.

  1. Ed Auth

    Ed Auth Auditioning

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    I'm getting ready to finish out my home theater, which is located on the second floor of my house. Since the construction is a basic plywood floor over 2x12 trusses, with a standard sheetrock ceiling below, I'm very concerned that the room(s) below the theater are going to get pounded with sound (especially bass) when the theater is cranked. This is a problem. At this stage of construction, are there any soundproofing techniques that could be reasonably implemented to reduce noise pollution (especially bass) to the remainder of the house?

    Thanks.
     
  2. MichaelDDD

    MichaelDDD Supporting Actor

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    Mike
    I'm not the expert, but I know this much.

    The more insulation you cram in every nook and cranny, the better off you'll be. Whether it should be blown-in insulation or the standard "pink stuff that comes in a big roll" I dunno.

    I remember also reading that "THX standards" dictate you have a layer of felt paper in between two layers of sheetrock...or words to that effect.

    I've also read that carefully caulking all the seams in a room also helps.

    This will hopefully be an interesting thread, as I'll have some of the same questions a few months down the road.

    Good luck, Ed.
     
  3. Dave Milne

    Dave Milne Supporting Actor

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    Ed,
    Unfortunately, reducing bass transmission through walls and floors is quite difficult... much more challenging than stopping high frequencies. Standard insulation isn't going to do much. Extra mass to absorb energy is always good, like double-drywall on the ceiling, perhaps including a sheet of high-density material like heavy felt or vinyl ( acoustiblok). The only completely effective solution is to "float" the floor (and ideally the rest the room, i.e. "room in a room") on rubber blocks. A less draconian solution might be to create one floating platform on which to place the seating and subwoofer.

    You might also check into resilient channel for mounting the ceiling drywall. I don't remember how much low-frequency improvement they claim.

    In general, you might want to check out sites like www.soundproofing.org for hints. Look for techniques that provide isolation well into the bass region - preferably to 20Hz, but again, these are rare.

    Good luck.
     
  4. JoseBN

    JoseBN Auditioning

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    Hi Ed. Dave is right. The pink stuff is not going to do any good.You should go for the mass loaded vinyl or the "soundboard" and build your floor in layers.The good news, It's always easier to work with your floor, you have gravity working with you. To work your ceiling is hard because it is almost imposible to seal around all the joists. Good luck. JoseBN
     
  5. Kevin Magee

    Kevin Magee Agent

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    Check with www.silentsource.com they have some products specifically desinged for this. I have the mass loaded vinyl which is what acoutiblok is, in my ceiling and walls. When I'm in my theater, my wife hears nothing and the bedroom is directly above my theater.
     

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