Maximum TV size for room?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mike Franklin, Oct 3, 2001.

  1. Mike Franklin

    Mike Franklin Stunt Coordinator

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    The room size is about 17x14 and currently I have a Proscan 36600 direct view tv but I would like to get a rear projection tv. I have look at the Toshiba 40-43 in. tvs and those seem like the would be just fine for my room size. But I had seen another post where some one had the same room size as I do and had bought a 65 in. TV. If this is possible to do in a room my size please let me know, I would like to get the Pioneer Elite 710HD/520HD or the Toshiba 42H81/65H81 rear project tvs. If some one could please give me the equation to calculate the right size tv for my room size, it would help out greatly.
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  2. Howard_A

    Howard_A Stunt Coordinator

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    That calculation is a bunch of hooey IMHO. I sit 8' away from 120" screen and I love it. It comes down to personal preference. That's what home theater is all about, right?
    (As far as I know I don't have superhuman expanded peripheral vision but I could be wrong.)
     
  3. Meaux

    Meaux Stunt Coordinator

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    >I sit 8' away from 120" screen and I love it.
    Now that's what I call "hardcore" viewing. Sure would have loved that in the 60's....:)
     
  4. Eliab

    Eliab Agent

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    Mike,
    Some people use the 5-8 times the height of the screen seating distance for NTSC programming and 3-5 times the height of the screen for HDTV rule. However, I agree with Howard in that in the end, it’s really subjective. There are definitely pros and cons to each approach though. The shear size of a large RPTV will cover more of your field of vision and in effect augment the “theater-like” experience. On the other hand, the larger display will also make artifacts and other anomalies much more noticeable. I would suggest that you consider splitting the decision in half and perhaps looking at other models like the Toshiba 50H81 or 57H81 instead of the 65H81. Good luck! [​IMG]
    Eliab
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  5. Mike Franklin

    Mike Franklin Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks guys for all your help, the reason I posted a message was to see how bad artifacts can be if you sit to close the the TV. I have very clear picture now with my current set and didn't want to loss any image quality with a bigger set. I want to get a set that is 16x9 so I can take advantage of Anamorphic Wide Screen. I can use all the input I can get, it would be much appreciated. Thanks!
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  6. Michael Jsmith

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    I have a 61" Sony HS10 in a room that is about the same size as yours. I sit about 10-11" back. It doesn't seem too big at all--in fact, I'm thinking of getting a front projector, so I, too, can watch a 120" screen!
    mike
     
  7. Mike Franklin

    Mike Franklin Stunt Coordinator

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    The only thing I'm worried about a front projector is maintenance. With DLP LCD projector I would have to replace the bulbs every 1000 hrs. and I know I watch at least 75hrs worth of television a week on avg. and with the bulbs costing anywhere from $400-500 to replace I don't have that kind of money spend every three months or so. That's why I figured a good rear projection TV would be happy medium. Even If I get a CRT I still cant watch as much TV as I would like as I can on a good Direct View or Rear Projt. I have a friend now that is dreading spending $2000 to replace the power supply on his Front Projt. and I don't want to have to go through those kind of hassles, cause like I said I watch a lot of TV. That's why I could use some good ideas on what I should do.
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  8. Eliab

    Eliab Agent

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    Mike,
    I agree with you. Another thing with FPTVs or DLP/LCD projectors is that off the bat one needs to spend a GREAT deal more money to achieve the same black levels than they can with a $2000.00 RPTV. And I’m not even getting into the ambient lighting issues that need serious attention as well with FPTVs systems in general.
    Eliab
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  9. Howard_A

    Howard_A Stunt Coordinator

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    Eliab -- I agree that with DLP/LCD you need to consider ambient light. I don't agree that black levels are a problem. The black levels on the NEC LT-150 are excellent with an 800:1 contrast ratio and it doesn't cost much more than $2000 these days.
     
  10. Mike Franklin

    Mike Franklin Stunt Coordinator

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    I forgot about lighting problems, I truly do not have 90% lighting control in my room currently and my basement is to small to set up a dedicated theater. I want to move in to a bigger house(mainly cause I need the room),but because I want to build a dedicate theater. There are to many factors that go into owning a CRT or DLP/LCD projector that I just don't have the patience to deal with. Believe me when it comes to HT I'm not a cheap scape neither, but I'm not dumb neither. Some HT's are simple over the top and there are those who probley spend thousands to have a dedicated HT built and then have to slack on the HT hardware. And then there are those thousands on both and more power too them, but I cant afford to do that. That's why I'm trying to find a happy medium. Most of my gear is Pioneer Elite running off Infinity Reference speakers, by no means does my setup lack. Could it be better, DEFINITELY, and one day it will be, but I don't want to be in a 100 thousand dollars in debt to do it either. You guys have had some good input on what I should do and I thank you all for you help.
    Mike.
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  11. Eliab

    Eliab Agent

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    Howard_A,
    I’ve been able to attain (and have seen other people attain) magnificent results within the lower region of the greyscale on RPTVs costing as little as $1,300.00. I’m talking on the order of truly rich film-like blacks without any inclination of being skewed towards any other shade other than black. And, add to that a beautiful delineation of shadow detail as well. I have never seen this type of solidity in this area of the picture (20-45 IRE) on any FPTV projector even close to this price (used FPTV units excluded).
    While looking at one of these lesser expensive new FPTV systems by themselves might appear solid in the lower IRE levels, compare them side-by-side to a properly calibrated RPTV (say a Toshiba 42H81). The difference in this area of the picture can be significant. Although, I have to admit that this disparity in producing solid blacks between good RPTVs and very inexpensive FPTVs is becoming less and less of an issue.
    Eliab
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