Marantz SR-66 to power SVS 20-39cs

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by WilliamJay, Nov 23, 2001.

  1. WilliamJay

    WilliamJay Stunt Coordinator

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    Could I use my Marantz SR-66 DPL receiver to power an SVS 20-39cs when I purchase a new receiver? The SR-66 only has 50 watts/channel up front and 25 watts/channel in the rear. Appreciate any thoughts. Thanks.
     
  2. SVS-Ron

    SVS-Ron Screenwriter

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    William,

    If that's a rating for 8 Ohm loads that should be plenty of power for some great bass. You won't max the sub out of course, and will need to take care you don't push the receiver too much (so that it overheats or shuts down), but I think you'll be staggered at what that little power can do with an efficient sub like the SVS CS's.

    As long as you are using a Dolby Digital receiver to manage your bass you'll be fine.

    Ron
     
  3. WilliamJay

    WilliamJay Stunt Coordinator

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    Ron, thank you very much for your quick reply and insight. One other question I had regarded the proper sub selection. My living room is approx. 12x18x10 and it opens up into the dining room. I was told by one of the local dealers that due to the size of my room, I would not hear anything lower than 25-30hz, that the room was not big enough for the sound waves to develop or something like that. Is this correct? If so, given this info, would I be better off with the 25-31cs or 20-39cs? Also, would I be better off saving my pennies and getting the powered version of either one of these?
     
  4. Lee-c

    Lee-c Second Unit

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    Ron can answer the tech questions. But personally, I'd rather have a PC and have plenty

    of power for the sub than buy one if my amp had quite a bit less power than the PC's built-in amp.

    I think it's worth the extra money to get the higher performance. When I get my SVS,

    I want to make sure it's being powered to a level that will let it really show what it can do.
     
  5. WilliamJay

    WilliamJay Stunt Coordinator

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    I would appreciate anyone's help regarding the proper sub selection for my living room and if what the local dealer told me was accurate. Thanks.
     
  6. SVS-Ron

    SVS-Ron Screenwriter

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    William,

    Without wanting to put too fine a point on it...your "dealer" is full of crap. Frankly, whether you buy an SVS or not I'd look hard for someplace else to buy your HT gear (if that's the general level knowledge and not just some kid with his head up his behind).

    Ask them why it is you can achieve 10-30Hz extension (easy) with good headphones? This "room is too small for deep bass" is a HT myth that is long overdue for debunking. It has been proven dead wrong by the best minds in the business, repeatedly.

    Fact is, you DO need lots of subwoofer power to get HIGH LEVELS of LOW BASS, but this is simply because large spaces have lots of air to pressurize. Your room is not what I'd call huge but it's still not small either. If you are on a tight budget get on CS sub now and use whatever amp/receiver you can afford (free is always good ;^) to power it. If you want theater levels of deep bass (AKA Dolby Reference Level) you almost certainly want dual SVS's down the road. About that time I'd look hard for an amp that can do the SVS CS's justice. We recommend the Samson line for many reasons, and we sometimes have b-stocks of them to save you a few more $. For general HT and music use our 20-39CS is by far the most popular line. It goes very low, yet can hit very high Sound Pressure Levels (SPL) in the more common bass ranges above 30Hz.
     

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