Making the move to HDTV

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by Tony-P, Jul 12, 2005.

  1. Tony-P

    Tony-P Auditioning

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    I have been thinking about upgrading to HDTV and I have a few questions.
    1. Is there any difference in quality and lifespan between tube and lcd?
    2. I am a videogame junkie- are there any types of HDTVs to shy away from due to the risk of screen-burn? Sony's PS3 will support 1080p- does anyone even make TVs that can handle that yet?
    3. A friend mentioned the idea of getting a projector and a screen. Does this have any advantages over LCDs or tube TVs?
    Thanks for the help.
     
  2. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    you'll love hd ... trust me.

    1. tube's have been around forever, so they're pretty bullet proof. but, from what i've read, lcd, dlp, plasma all have a long life-span. plasma half-life is rated around 10 years. lcd/dlp are probably around 10 years or more as well. really, the question is, what kind of tv will you be able to buy in 10 years? probably one so advanced you'll want to get rid of your current one anyway.

    2. if you a gamer, do not get a plasma (due to possible burn-in). go with a lcd or dlp ... no burn in issues at all. even with a plasma, you might not get burn-in ... if you're careful. that risk is up to you.

    3. no clue ... i guess you get a much bigger screen. [​IMG]
     
  3. Dustin Elmore

    Dustin Elmore Stunt Coordinator

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    I could be misstaken, but the burning occurs in the screen of projection tv's. Regardless of whether its and LCD, DLP, or tube projection system, the screen will still suffer burn if you let it. Now a Direct view LCD display shouldn't have any problems, will look great, and can support 1080p. They cost more however.
     
  4. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Dustin, it's not the "screen" that gets burned in; it's the "engine" in some of these devices -- in CRT-based direct-view and rear-projection sets and in plasma panels. The digital devices, DLP and LCD, do not experience burn-in.
     
  5. KeithMoechnig

    KeithMoechnig Stunt Coordinator

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    1. LCD has "look" to it(a little more vivid image) and seems to have less burn-in, or so I've heard.
    2. They have started producing them, but not a whole lot. Westinghouse Digital started shipping a 37-inch LCD for $2,299
    3. Bigger screen, more spouse satisfaction not having a big TV taking up space. If you have a room without control of ambient light(ex. window) this isn't a good option.
     
  6. Charlie Campisi

    Charlie Campisi Screenwriter

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    I know my RPTV won't support the sony light guns, so I can't play Time Crisis on it. I imagine a projector wouldn't work either for gun games.
     
  7. David Noll

    David Noll Stunt Coordinator

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    Definitely bigger image! It steps-up HDTV to a true theater experience. Click link below. Imagine playing games on a 8' screen in high-def!

    David
     

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