Lying To My Reciever

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by Allen Marshall, Oct 30, 2003.

  1. Allen Marshall

    Allen Marshall Supporting Actor

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    my reciever....like...all of them give me certain options such as is my speaker small or large, main sub, both sub, or subwoofer sub, how far away am i from my speakers, Center EQ etc and a couple of others


    how should i lie to my reciever, does saying my speaker is small make it drive the sub harder...or weaker, does telling my speaker im farther away make it louder or make it so the sound hits my ear faster cause it thinks its farther away, like my rears, im no more then 5 feet away from both of them at the sweet spot, and i think i have it set on like 8 feet away, and im 9 feet away from the center, i said it's 12 feet awayand such, i want to know if i should tell the truth cause it does what it does best or should i lie to benefit, and in what ways.

    Thanks
     
  2. MichaelDDD

    MichaelDDD Supporting Actor

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    Your questions relate to Bass Management and Surround Processing.

    When you set your speakers to "small" or "large" you determine the cutoff frequency for those speakers. When set to "small" typically, any frequencies above 80Hz are sent to your main/surround speakers. Below 80Hz is sent to the sub. Better receivers have a variable crossover. Typically you choose b/t 60-80-100-120Hz for the cutoff freq. My Kenwood VR-409 is fixed at 100Hz, unfortunately.

    How "hard" the sub is driven is simply a function of the gain control for that channel. Combined with the gain control on the sub itself.

    Setting the distance from your listening position to each speaker effects the delay time (in milliseconds) that the receiver places on the signal going to that speaker. For example, if your center channel is 9 feet from your listening position, but your surrounds are 13 feet away, the center channel will be delayed slightly more so that the sounds arrive at you at the same time.

    Hope this helps. [​IMG]
     
  3. Allen Marshall

    Allen Marshall Supporting Actor

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    and what happens when there set to large?
     
  4. MichaelDDD

    MichaelDDD Supporting Actor

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    Typically, a full range signal is sent to all the speaker outputs. I.E. 20Hz-20KHz.

    Not a good idea unless you main speakers are seriously large. I.E. 12" woofs or really good speakers w/10" woofs.
     
  5. Allen Marshall

    Allen Marshall Supporting Actor

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    they have 2 8 inches in them, so should i set the main's to small as well?

    there Athena AS-F2's and my rears are AS-B2's

    why would i want all sub noises to come out of the front/subwoofer, isnt it better if something goes around the room, and the noise has bass, that it goes from speaker to speaker to speaker with deep bass instead of just commin out of the subwoofer the whole time???
     
  6. MichaelDDD

    MichaelDDD Supporting Actor

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    When you set your main/surround speakers to "large" ALL bass information gets sent to them as well as to the sub.

    While this may sound like a good thing, in 99% of all cases it's not. Here's why.

    1. Making bass requires lots of raw wattage. A 12" woofer playing a 30Hz tone at 90db requires a lot more power than a 5" midrange playing a 5KHz tone. While music is not "test tones" you get the idea.

    2. I don't know the specs on your speakers...I'd guess they are rated down to 40Hz or so. But very few, if any 8" woofers can handle sub bass frequencies very well at high volumes, if at all. By relieving these smaller drivers of "bass duties" you allow them to concentrate their effort on frequencies they produce very well; midbass and up. Midbass is arguably around 80Hz and higher.

    3. Related to #1, your receiver/amplifier only produces "this much" power. Asking your amp to provide big power for bass for all 5 or 7 speakers at the same time will overtax it, resulting in clipping. (very bad). This will happen unless you have some serious amplification. Even a flagship receiver does not count as "serious amplification." Outboard amps in the neighborhood of 150WPC is serious amplification in my book.

    4. By delegating the low bass duties to a separate POWERED subwoofer, the amp is completely relieved of bass duties and can concentrate all of it's juice on the midbass and higher frequencies. Your main speakers will actually play LOUDER and CLEANER due to the "extra power" available to them.
     
  7. Doug_B

    Doug_B Screenwriter

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  8. Oachalon

    Oachalon Stunt Coordinator

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    except for the terrible talent i have where i can for some reason tell where the bass is coming from. It pisses me off so thats why I have my front speakers set to large. I think it makes a huge difference for me.
     
  9. Allen Marshall

    Allen Marshall Supporting Actor

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    alrighty, thanks guys
     

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