LP records to CD

Discussion in 'Music' started by ozwick, Oct 29, 2004.

  1. ozwick

    ozwick Auditioning

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    I would like to make CD's of all of my LP/33 albums. What is the best, easiest to use , and most affordable? It must have noise reduction capabilities. I have seen a couple on the internet such as LP Ripper and Blaze.

    Any opinions

    Thanks,

    ozwick
     
  2. John Wes

    John Wes Stunt Coordinator

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    1 Turntable, one preamp to boost the signal from the turntable...a stereo to mini plug from the preamp to your soundcard input..A decient soundcard...and software to record 16 bit 44.1 wav files. I don't know if the software included with windows will do that large a file.

    Also, it's nice if your sofware will let you split the wav file. Here's why. When you record it, half the album..(one side of the disc) will show up as one song. You'll need to split them up if you want to see the different tracks when you burn them to CD.....

    Software that comes with most Soundcards should let you record large wav files but to my knowledge, I think you may have to spend some cash to find software that does a somewhat decient job at noise reduction...

    I think you can probably find a freebie for splitting wavs but any software that has noise reduction should also be able to split the wav file up for you...

    I'd bet there are quite a few threads you could find on the subject here..
     
  3. Charles Gurganus

    Charles Gurganus Supporting Actor

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    I still think you would be better off with a component burner like the Pioneer PDR 609. I got one off of ebay for about $120 (they usually go for $150-$200). The nice thing about this burner is it has a seperate ANALOG level for recording.

    I like to make the master from the 609 on CD-RW's and then go to the computer for copies (using data blanks). You can do whatever you need with computer software at that point. Everyone seems to have a different theory/method about this. I just want the music without spending hours farting around with a computer. My vinyl is in great shape though and I use a Record Doctor II. I leave the signal alone. If I wanted compressed dead sounding music, I'd just buy the CD.
     
  4. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    I second Charles' recommendation. The single most important component in determining how good your recordings come out is the analog-to-digital converter. Most non-pro sound cards have poor performance in this area. Adequate for most consumer uses, but fair or poor for hi-fi sound. Even the cheapest CD recording decks will better anything but a pro sound card in this area.

    Software I recommend for making your CDs: cakewalk Pyro 2004.
     
  5. Kevin M

    Kevin M Producer

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    There is a free program out there that I use all the time for recording & editing Wav files called AUDACITY that is very good and will fit almost everything you need to do...although it does have a noise reduction feature that might help with the scratches and pops of vinyl you may want to look for a program like Depopper, it isn't free but you can download a demo version, there may be a free program comparable to Depopper, just do a little searching.

    However I personally have used an old technique to remove pop's & noise from albums when making a final CD copy, you get some distilled water and apply enough to fill the grooves of what ever track you are recording (use the little brush for cleaning the needle to work it into the grooves) and this will effectively remove the scratches & pops...it might also damage the album after awhile so make sure you are getting a good recording the first time before you go to this extreme.

    The problem with stand alone decks is that (as far as I know) they force you to use "Music-CD" media that only allows an analog signal to be played back....I don't like that, although if you are only using it to record vinyl I don't suppose it would matter.
     
  6. Andrew Chong

    Andrew Chong Supporting Actor

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    I used to do this until I discovered Nero. Nero allows you to place 'markers' on that long wav file wherever you want new tracks to start. Much quicker and more efficient than that other method.
     
  7. Tom Brennan

    Tom Brennan Screenwriter

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    Thta's almost exaclty what I do! Just one music CD-RW is all you need and do everything else on the computer.
     
  8. Brian L

    Brian L Cinematographer

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    Well, they do require the use of Music CD-Rs, which are quite expensive vs. data discs, but there is no SCMS (Serial Copy Management System) applied when dubbing from an analog source. You can copy those CDs as many times as you want, AFAIK.

    A digital dub does prevent you from copying the copy.

    Good tip on Nero. I now, after a long long time, have an nice TT in the rig, and have planned to copy some LPs via my Pioneer 509 deck. Was wondering how to deal with track number, as the automatic numbering does not work that well, and I would rather not have to sit they are enter them manually while making the dub.

    So, Andrew, is this just a matter of copying the CD to the harddrive, and then editing with Nero, followed by a burn of that newly edited file?

    BGL
     
  9. Kevin M

    Kevin M Producer

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    But Brian, the other thing he needed was an ability to reduce the pops & scratches of vinyl plus editing....now I haven't looked at any of the newer decks but I don't believe they have noise reduction or any ability to edit (in any meaningful way) the tracks, therefore I think ozwick's best choice would be a PC...whether or not the D/A conversion is the best is a moot point IMO when taking into consideration all the other anomalies that LP's have...I think he will be best served with a PC...plus don't forget he said "CHEAP" and going out and buying a 130$ + deck won't exactly fit the bill, especially when compared to the fact that most of the programs he will need he can get for free online.
     
  10. KrisM

    KrisM Second Unit

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    Yamaha makes CD recorders that have excellent editing features(track fade-in, out, track divide, combine etc) with a built in hard drive. They aren't cheap, but I love my CDR-HD1300. I haven't burned any vinyl yet, but it works great for burning CD copies of single layer SACDs.
    The reason I have it is a warrany replacement for various Pioneer decks that I had MAJOR problems with. There is a thread somewhere about my, and others frustration with the Pioneer units.
    If you want noise reduction however, you will still have to use a computer program for that. The price of blanks is more for a component burner, but just use a CDRW, then edit on a computer. And once it is on a computer the SCMS problem goes out the window.

    Regards
    KrisM
     
  11. Kevin M

    Kevin M Producer

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    Yeah, I thought about the newer decks with harddrives (I believe Pioneer also has a high end one) but my point is that ozwick wanted it to be cheap...these ideas are really good for audiophiles with cash to spend and a good ear for truly high end audio quality but I don't think he is wanting to go to those cash extremes...however, ozwick, if I'm wrong then correct me.
     
  12. ozwick

    ozwick Auditioning

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    Thanks for all the replies!!

    GREAT FORUM!!!!!!!!!!

    OK, let me tell you what I have as to hardware and software.

    Here is the hardware that I have own now.

    Denon 3803 AV receiver
    20+ year old Marantz 33/LP Turntable
    Dell 4600 2.4 GHZ
    Planning on buying a Plextor 712 A internal DVD/CD burner and a video capture for the VCR tapes.

    Question? What route would you take to burn your LP's and VCR tapes to CD's and DVD's. I don't want to get too pricy and want easy to use software with noise reduction to convert my LP's.

    Can I use my Dell PC to do the work and have a software package to clean up the hiss and pops? Do I connect my Marantz turntable to my Denon 3803 then to my Dell? Then run software to clean up the tracks and then burn to a CD?

    Thank you for all of the input but now I am very confused.

    Mark
     
  13. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    Cakewalk Pyro allows you to put CD multiple tracks for a single WAV. It is a program developed by a pro music software specialist company. It contains software to record and edit your WAV files, clean them up, and burn CDs. It is the best tool on the market for a low price that I know of, at only $29.00. Here's a comparison chart of Pyro versus other CD writing software
    With Pyro you'll have one low cost solution for recording, cleaning the tracks, and burning your CDs. You'll record each LP side as one big WAV file, clean/edit them, then put track marks wherever you want when you burn the CD.
     
  14. Kevin M

    Kevin M Producer

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    First question, do you have Musicmatch or any CD burning software on your Dell?

    If so then how does FREE sound for an expense?
    (I'll just cut & paste what I said in my first post)
    There is a free program out there that I use all the time for recording & editing Wav files called AUDACITY that is very good and will fit almost everything you need to do, it will let you separate tracks, edit tracks, fade in/fade out, etc. And although it does have a noise reduction feature that might help with the scratches and pops of vinyl you may want to look for a program like Depopper, it isn't free but you can download a demo version, there may be a free program comparable to Depopper, just do a little searching.

    Now the reason I ask if you have a CD burning program is that the only thing Audacity won't do is burn the Wav. files to a cd-r, for that you will have to use a separate burning program.


    The options that other posters have recommended are equally good and some have the burning software built right in...the only thing you have to decide will be if you want to pay for the slight extra convenience or go with the free route but need to compile the CD's yourself using another program...it is up to you, your patience & your wallet.


    HERE IS A SITE that will tell you everything you need to know (and what programs you will need) in order to copy LP's to CD's.
    There are many sites like this that offer help in this area, just go to GOOGLE and type in "how to copy LP's to CD's on a PC" and you will find many links to choose from that will help.
     
  15. Paul_Nyman

    Paul_Nyman Second Unit

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    Ozwick,

    You can also try a software called CDWAVE, Do a Google search and you should be able to find it for download. It will split up a a wav file for individual tracks from each LP side on your hard drive. In addition there's Wave Repair which can do the same as CD Wave except you can do extensive restoration to the material before burning on CDR media.

    I did locate an old link if you want to do some extensive reading about LP to CDR tranfers here http://www.delback.co.uk/lp-cdr.htm


    Goodluck!
     

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