Low Priced DD/DTS reciever for 4ohm speakers?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Ches Campbell, Nov 10, 2001.

  1. Ches Campbell

    Ches Campbell Stunt Coordinator

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    I have some Focal speakers that are 4 ohms (made for car audio). These are really nice speakers and I really want to use them for my HT. I need a reciever that will put out the same or more wattage at 4 ohms as it will at 8 ohms. My main problem is that I am a college student with not a lot of money. Please list some reciver's that will work for my situation. I am looking for one with DD and DTS decoders built in. It can be used and I don't mind buying off of the net. Thanks a lot.
     
  2. Geoff L

    Geoff L Screenwriter

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    Hello Ches and welcome to HTF,
    Your question dealing with the 8ohm 4ohm thing is not a question of power needing to be the same but one of, a reciver that will handel a 4ohm load safely.
    Any time a you drop the ohm load a receiver sees, it just makes the amp work much harder.
    Not all receivers like to see 4 ohm speakers. It's more complicated than this, but lets just keep it simple. Most recievers are power rated into 8ohms usually.~~~ X amount of watts per channel into 8ohms. (this spec rateing thing is another area that isnt allways what it seems) A whole nother thread could/has been wrote about this issue.
    If a recievier/amp can safely drive a lower ohm load (in your case 4ohms) it will usually double the recievers power. Remember lets keep it simple.
    Now most recievers will drive a 4ohm load, but when pushed ~ (cranking up the volume for a while), a receiver that can't handel it will shut down, go into protection mode, blow a fuse or if not protected by one of these means, just melt down/blowup. Some may just plain refuse to drive it period from the get go.
    Most receivers that are {4ohm safe will say so in it's paper work and or/spec sheet. Some receivers need a switch, swictched into a different position, others need nothing done, meaning just wire up and go.
    In short, the same receiver will ~{play louder}~ with a 4ohm speaker than an 8ohm, given all things ~{being equal speaker spec wise}~, except for thier ohm rating.
    Is any of this makeing any sence at all. [​IMG]
    Affordable brands DD/DTS known to handel 4-ohm loads well or at least without going into protect mode or melt down=======
    Onkyo
    H/K
    Yamaha
    There are other lower costing model/brands certainy, but I have no hands on peronal experience with them. These brands I do, and all thier lower-mid end receivers seems to handel 4-ohm loads well, even when you work them hard. Cranking them up and watching an entire movie or listenng to a complete music CD.
    A little long winded, but think this might help put the 4-ohm reciever thing in better perspective for you.
    Geoff
     
  3. Ches Campbell

    Ches Campbell Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks a lot Geoff. Yes I understand your post. I main reason I asked this question is becasue of an article in the most recet Consumer Reports. They tested recievers at 8 and 4 ohms. SOme of them actually put out less watts at 4 ohms. I don't see how its possible. I am a big car audio buff, but am just recently getting in to home theater. I know about ohm loads and such for car audio, but when I saw this article I was confused. The only reciever that they tested that seemed to have enough wattage at 4 ohms was the SOny STR DE675 which has a switch for 4 ohm or 8 ohm. The weird thing about this was that at 8 ohms it put out 130 wats, and at 4 ohms it put out 108 watts.
    SO anyway, to make a long story short I just wanted to know of a reciever that can handle a 4 ohm load without cutting out.
    Thanks a lot.
     
  4. Norm Strong

    Norm Strong Stunt Coordinator

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    If you can find a Technics DX930 or DX940, they will do a good job of driving a pair of 4 ohm speakers. Just don't try to run them on all 5 channels. These should be available used for about $100.
     
  5. Thomas_Berg

    Thomas_Berg Screenwriter

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    a receiver/amp should put out about half the wattage at 4 ohms as opposed to 8 ohms, due to the difference in resistance.
    i'd look at the Onkyo TX-DS595 for your receiver; i'm a poor college guy myself and found the $359 price managable. www.jandr.com will sell it to you that low if you call them.
    for your situation, stay away from all but Onkyo, H/K, Denon, and Yamaha. Outlaw, Marantz, and Rotel also make great receivers, but i dont think they would be in your price range unless you're willing to spend $500.
    ------------------
    -Thomas
    My HT
     
  6. Chuck Kent

    Chuck Kent Supporting Actor

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    Ummm, actually, half the impedence (resistance) doubles the power if the voltage remains the same. So, under "ideal" conditions, an amp's (receiver's) power should be twice as much for a 4 ohm load than an 8 ohm one.
    The main worry for 4 ohm speakers vs. 8 ohm ones is that the output transistors must disipate much more heat for a 4 ohm load. As Geoff notes, some receiver makers use a 4/8 ohm switch to lower the power supply voltage (in the 4 ohm setting), thereby lowering the total wattage that would be generated (and the heat that goes with the higher output.) The 4 ohm switch is also how receiver makers pass the UL/CSA heat safety rating tests.
    As long as your speakers are fairly efficient, ie. higher volume with low power input, or if you don't play at very loud levels, then the 4 vs. 8 ohm situation is not a serious worry. Also, make sure that you have plenty of ventilation for whatever you buy...
    (BTW, all of the recommended units are good to look at. While I really like many of Sony's products, I can't recommend any DE series Sony receivers. They are acknowledged by many on this forum as Sony's least reliable versions.)
    ------------------
     
  7. Geoff L

    Geoff L Screenwriter

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    Nicely put Chuck,
    As they say, and thats, that!
    I new that dry ice came with it for something. [​IMG]
    Ya know, the 4-ohm load cooler option... It isnt allways included with your receiver purchase.
    Geoff
     

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