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Looking for Advice on Ripping my CD Collection (1 Viewer)

Scott Merryfield

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But my main question is...can Adobe Audition import information about the albums/tracks, etc.? Typing in all those would be cumbersome.

I used the "Extract Audio from CD" command in the file menu. I don't see "Save All Audio as Batch Process."
Mike, I am not familiar with Adobe Audition, but if you use Exact Audio Copy to rip / compress your CDs, it will look up and add the album meta data for you. So will iTunes. Be aware that this information is not always 100% accurate -- the errors I find mostly are typographical -- so you may need to do some minor cleanup afterwards. I also edit the artist name to "Last Name, First Name" so that the music sorts alphabetically by the artist's last name (just a preference of mine). This editing can be done via a freeware app such as MP3 Tag -- or if you are using iTunes on your PC to organize your music, via that application.

If you end up converting music from other formats, such as DVD-Audio or concert DVD/BD, depending on how you do this, you may need to enter the meta data manually. My method of using Audacity to record the playback on my PC and saving to a WAV file requires this manual data entry. There are tools out there that do this rip in a more automated fashion, but most of those cost money and I didn't have enough of this type to convert where I wanted to spend money on a solution. Audacity and Wave Editor are free.
 

Scott Merryfield

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Bobby: I just used Adobe Audition to rip the same Diana Krall CD to 320kb/s mp3s. It seemed to go fairly quick. But am I going to have to type in each track name when I do this? That could be rather labor intensive.

And, do you know if there is a way to change the default "Save As" from .wav to .mp3?

==================

Maybe just doing one rip of each CD at 320kb/s .mp3s is the way to go...
I would suggest ripping a very small number of albums you consider your best sounding albums to MP3 and FLAC and play them back on your main home system to see which is acceptable to you. Personally, I do not listen to my ripped music on the home system, so I don't worry about that, and high bit rate MP3 sounds fine on all the portable / mobile situations I use.

I did copy a bunch of my MP3 files to a thumb drive for my Denon X33000W receiver, but found it was too much of a pain to search for music on the thumb drive via the Denon, and setting up some sort of a server / playback system via something like Plex didn't interest me. For the few times I sit down and listen to music "seriously", I still do it the old fashioned way -- I just play the disc. When I do that, it's usually either a high res disc (SACD or DVD-Audio) or concert DVD/BD anyway. About the only time a redbook CD gets played in our home is in our basement recreation room, where I have an old Kenwood integrated amp and Sony 5-disc CD carousel player driving four JBL Northridge speakers. I will sometimes play music if we are entertaining down there (there is a wet bar, pool table, ping pong table and electronic dart board) or if I am practicing my putting (I have a small golf putting mat I unroll in the winter). All my redbook CDs are stored in a couple of custom racks my late father made for me years ago, and I keep them in the basement, since that is the only place I use them.

If I want to listen to my ripped music as more casual background music, I just send it to a bluetooth speaker via my phone, as all my MP3 files are stored on a microSD card on the phone.
 

Nelson Au

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On the question of using a server to stream the ripped music, DaveF, I looked at my Oppo settings last night and the wifi is on. What I couldn’t figure out at the time was how it can see my Mac Pro with its Plex server installed. This morning I did a search as I recall that Stereophile reviewer Kal Rubinson had written reviews and said he has a server in a Mac Mini that his Oppo streams the music files from. In digging deeper, you need a DLNA server application installed on the computer. So I didn’t know that. Reading further, I see the Plex server can be configured as DLNA server as it’s built in already. I didn’t know that. So for my set-up, it looks like it’s partway there already. Just need to configure it. I’ll explore this further and see if I can make it work. It will be great if it works!

I was playing the Beatles 2009 remastered files from their Apple USB stick on the Oppo via the Oppo’s USB port and it was great. I’m sure I can get that to work on the server, so that will be exciting.
 
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Bobby Henderson

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I used the "Extract Audio from CD" command in the file menu. I don't see "Save All Audio as Batch Process."

I'm pretty sure Audition CS5.5 still has Batch Processing functions under a Batch Process panel. Options for adding files to a list and doing various things to them via the effect rack or running export operations should still be there. I'm not sure which version of Audition it was that added the "Save All Audio as Batch Process" as an item in the File menu. But it has been there a long time. The "Save All Audio as Batch Process" command should at least be available from a menu in the Batch Process panel. I'm using the latest version of Adobe Creative Cloud. I have an old (and legit) copy of the Adobe CS5.5 Master Collection. But it has been almost a decade since I was using those versions of Adobe applications.
 

Mike Frezon

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I'm pretty sure Audition CS5.5 still has Batch Processing functions under a Batch Process panel. Options for adding files to a list and doing various things to them via the effect rack or running export operations should still be there. I'm not sure which version of Audition it was that added the "Save All Audio as Batch Process" as an item in the File menu. But it has been there a long time. The "Save All Audio as Batch Process" command should at least be available from a menu in the Batch Process panel. I'm using the latest version of Adobe Creative Cloud. I have an old (and legit) copy of the Adobe CS5.5 Master Collection. But it has been almost a decade since I was using those versions of Adobe applications.
Thanks, Bobby. I didn't want to buy into Adobe's subscription model...so I'm standing pat @ 5.5.

I just went looking and found a "Batch Process" command in the Edit menu.

Not sure why you mentioned it...but I feel compelled to say my version of 5.5 is legit, too. I also have a standalone version of Audition 1.5.

Still wondering about the answer to this question:

But my main question is...can Adobe Audition import information about the albums/tracks, etc.? Typing in all those would be cumbersome.
If it can't, I would likely not use Audition in this process.
 

Bobby Henderson

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Not sure why you mentioned it...but I feel compelled to say my version of 5.5 is legit, too. I also have a standalone version of Audition 1.5.

I wasn't meaning to imply you were using cracked software, but Adobe's software has been very popular with software pirates. As much as I paid for my copy of CS5.5 Master Collection it seemed worth it to mention it being legit.

Regarding the auto-naming of files when they're ripped from a retail music CD, I can't say for certain if the CS5.5 version of Audition will do that since I haven't used that version in at least several years. I do know the past few CC versions of Audition have been able to do so. But either way it's not really a big deal. There are other third party applications that can automatically re-name song files and edit metadata in song files stored in formats that can embed metadata. I mentioned TagScanner previously. It works really well and it's available for free. But there are other applications that offer similar functions.
 

BobO'Link

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Here's another question.

What about all these other (even higher) bit rates for mp3s available to me on EAC?

full


...all the way up to 1024! Does that make them even better? Are they impractical?
I totally forgot about that one little checkbox - "Delete WAV after compression". If that box is unchecked your export folder will have both the WAV files *and* compressed copies of whatever scheme you've selected. They'll have the same name, just a different extension.

Those higher bit rates just mean "less lossy" than lower ones. Still not lossless but closer and the files will be a bit larger.
 

BobO'Link

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I wasn't meaning to imply you were using cracked software, but Adobe's software has been very popular with software pirates. As much as I paid for my copy of CS5.5 Master Collection it seemed worth it to mention it being legit.

Regarding the auto-naming of files when they're ripped from a retail music CD, I can't say for certain if the CS5.5 version of Audition will do that since I haven't used that version in at least several years. I do know the past few CC versions of Audition have been able to do so. But either way it's not really a big deal. There are other third party applications that can automatically re-name song files and edit metadata in song files stored in formats that can embed metadata. I mentioned TagScanner previously. It works really well and it's available for free. But there are other applications that offer similar functions.
I missed you mentioning TagScanner. I looked it up - pretty good program *and* it has a portable version. Always a plus.
 

Wayne_j

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It would be helpful if ripping software would allow tagging from CD Text built into the disc as an option. That way you would be more likely to get accurate tags than being at the mercy of some user generated track listing.
 

Mike Frezon

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I totally forgot about that one little checkbox - "Delete WAV after compression". If that box is unchecked your export folder will have both the WAV files *and* compressed copies of whatever scheme you've selected. They'll have the same name, just a different extension.

Those higher bit rates just mean "less lossy" than lower ones. Still not lossless but closer and the files will be a bit larger.

Thanks, Howie. That's what I figured, of course. But why aren't they talked about much? It sounds like they might be an option to get me where I want to go in terms of using the same files at home and in the car (assuming the car will play ANY SIZE mp3).

Maybe there is a degree of diminishing returns? While you can go higher bit rate, it doesn't improve the sound enough to make it cost-effective in terms of drive space.
 

Mike Frezon

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As much as I paid for my copy of CS5.5 Master Collection it seemed worth it to mention it being legit.
It wasn't cheap, brother (another reason I'm ride/die with it!). It all still does what I need it to do. The CS5.5 Photoshop doesn't recognize the raw files from my Canon 80D. But I can get around that with a small file converter program. We use Creative Cloud in my work place and I just don't see nearly enough reason to upgrade at home.

Regarding the auto-naming of files when they're ripped from a retail music CD, I can't say for certain if the CS5.5 version of Audition will do that since I haven't used that version in at least several years. I do know the past few CC versions of Audition have been able to do so. But either way it's not really a big deal. There are other third party applications that can automatically re-name song files and edit metadata in song files stored in formats that can embed metadata. I mentioned TagScanner previously. It works really well and it's available for free. But there are other applications that offer similar functions.

But I really don't want to add another step to the process. That's what this thread is all about. If I can't figure out how to get Audition to do that, it's pretty much a deal breaker for me. I want this to be easy-peasy.
 

BobO'Link

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Thanks, Howie. That's what I figured, of course. But why aren't they talked about much? It sounds like they might be an option to get me where I want to go in terms of using the same files at home and in the car (assuming the car will play ANY SIZE mp3).

Maybe there is a degree of diminishing returns? While you can go higher bit rate, it doesn't improve the sound enough to make it cost-effective in terms of drive space.
Well... I didn't know for sure so did some research and found what I said isn't correct. Apparently MP3 only goes up to 320mbps and that drop down is ignored depending on how you have the command line set.

Here's a site with fairly good documentation on some setup attributes of EAC:

I'm not sure if I used that, or another site, when I set my system up. I do know it took some googling to get what I wanted configured properly and I may have all that in a file on the computer holding the program (been too long and I just don't recall for sure).

While looking that up I also visited the EAC site and discovered there's a new version as of November 2020. It apparently has the ability to simultaneously rip to MP3 and FLAC, putting each type in separate directories during the process. However, there's still no documentation on his site so you're pretty dependent on finding that elsewhere.
 

JediFonger

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Well... I didn't know for sure so did some research and found what I said isn't correct. Apparently MP3 only goes up to 320mbps and that drop down is ignored depending on how you have the command line set.

Here's a site with fairly good documentation on some setup attributes of EAC:

I'm not sure if I used that, or another site, when I set my system up. I do know it took some googling to get what I wanted configured properly and I may have all that in a file on the computer holding the program (been too long and I just don't recall for sure).

While looking that up I also visited the EAC site and discovered there's a new version as of November 2020. It apparently has the ability to simultaneously rip to MP3 and FLAC, putting each type in separate directories during the process. However, there's still no documentation on his site so you're pretty dependent on finding that elsewhere.
Non-standard bit rates up to 640 kbit/s can be achieved with the LAME encoder and the freeformat option, although few MP3 players can play those files. According to the ISO standard, decoders are only required to be able to decode streams up to 320 kbit/s.
only reason why that setting is present in EAC is because you can rip CD and then encode to pretty much anything out there like flac, alac, ogg, etc.etc. so that option is present for other codecs as well, it's not just for mp3s.
 

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Bobby Henderson

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The CS5.5 Photoshop doesn't recognize the raw files from my Canon 80D. But I can get around that with a small file converter program. We use Creative Cloud in my work place and I just don't see nearly enough reason to upgrade at home.

IIRC Adobe still has its Adobe Camera RAW utility that can read a really wide variety of both old and new digital camera models and convert those RAW files in lossless fashion to a DNG (Digital Negative) format for Camera RAW or Lightroom like processing. I remember using the utility when I first bought a Canon 5D Mark II camera because the copy of Photoshop I was using at the time (CS2 I think) wouldn't read the CR2 files created by the camera. So I had to convert the images to DNG files.


But I really don't want to add another step to the process. That's what this thread is all about. If I can't figure out how to get Audition to do that, it's pretty much a deal breaker for me. I want this to be easy-peasy.

You're probably going to have to either dig into the documentation for your CS5.5 copy of Audition or just experiment with it to see what works. I like the CD ripping functions in Audition since they seem to skip right over 90's era copy protection garbage. For example, I have a CD single of Dido's hit "White Flag." That had some of that scramble-the-audio copy protection garbage built into it. I tried copying it using Roxio's EZ CD Creator way back when to no avail. It didn't work. Some years later, when Adobe discontinued the Soundbooth application and replaced it with Audition that did the trick. IIRC there was a Monster Magnet CD that had the same garbage going on with it. Audition ripped "Space Lord" flawlessly.

If you rip song files from CDs in an organized fashion, saving them in appropriately named folders, it is possible for applications like TagScanner to see the folder name and then analyze "CD Track 01, 02" etc and get a good idea how things are supposed to be named automatically. That can be faster than going into Windows File Explorer or the Mac OSX Finder and manually renaming song files.
 

theJman

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To organize cds I have folders for artists with folders for albums inside the artist folder.

That's the same thing I do. Whether it was my albums or CD's that's how I always arranged them so when it came time for digital I just continued with what I was most familiar with.
 

Scott Merryfield

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It wasn't cheap, brother (another reason I'm ride/die with it!). It all still does what I need it to do. The CS5.5 Photoshop doesn't recognize the raw files from my Canon 80D. But I can get around that with a small file converter program. We use Creative Cloud in my work place and I just don't see nearly enough reason to upgrade at home.



But I really don't want to add another step to the process. That's what this thread is all about. If I can't figure out how to get Audition to do that, it's pretty much a deal breaker for me. I want this to be easy-peasy.

Mike, instead of messing around with such old software, I would recommend just using either Exact Audio Copy or iTunes for the ripping / compression process. There will be no additional step required to enter the metadata with either program, and both applications are free.

I moved on from Adobe when they switched to a subscription model and have been very happy with my decision. I never was a full-blown Photoshop user, but used Lightroom extensively to process my RAW photo files. I now use DxO PhotoLab, and am very satisfied with the results. I do still have Photoshop Elements, but that is not part of Adobe's subscription model -- if it becomes so, I will move on from that, too.
 

Bobby Henderson

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I would never recommend someone buy (or get a subscription of) Adobe Audition just for the purpose of ripping Red Book retail music CDs. That's like using a 155mm Paladin Howitzer cannon to kill a mosquito. We've only been talking about Audition since Mike happened to already have a copy of it. Audition can do far more things with audio than just ripping CDs, and it should be able to considering the standards bar for competition in the audio-video production space is getting raised higher and higher. I think Adobe is doing all it can to keep up with Blackmagic Design, Avid, Apple, etc.
 

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