Looking for advice on finishing oak enclosures.

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jeffrey Noel, Dec 18, 2002.

  1. Jeffrey Noel

    Jeffrey Noel Screenwriter

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    Well, I've finished cutting and sanding the small enclosures for my full-range drivers that I built out of oak. But there are some gaps that need to be filled in with wood filler/putty. Is there a certain kind I should use? When I stain the oak I don't want the wood filler to be a different color.

    Speaking of stain, what brand/type do you guys recommend? I've never stained anything so methods are also more than welcome. Should I use a sealer or a clear coat?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    They have wood putty for different kinds of wood (I saw it Home Depot, so that's one source), so find the oak wood putty, and you should be able to finish it like it was real oak once it's dried and sanded smooth.
     
  3. Pete Mazz

    Pete Mazz Supporting Actor

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    If you're talking about minor gaps, I would stain, apply a coat of finish, use matching oil putty, then 2nd coat. If you use Minwax stain, look for matching Minwax putty. It comes in small plastic containers. It has the consistency of putty, so just work it into any gaps and wipe clean with mineral spirits or naptha.

    If you're not very careful with fillers before you stain and seal, they can ruin your final finish.

    Pete
     
  4. Hank Frankenberg

    Hank Frankenberg Cinematographer

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    Oak is a a pain to stain. I have quit using stain. The huge gaps/pore openings make an even stain very difficult. Professional advice is to use a high silica solids sanding sealer liberally applied to fill the pores, then sand, and then try to stain. I use dye, which penetrates the wood (stain doesn't penetrate as deep). Also, use a pre-stain conditioner, which as best as I can tell, is a light sanding sealer. If you have a Woodcraft or similar woodworking supplies store near you, go there and talk to the resident finishing expert. Ask for advice and product recommendations.
     
  5. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    Solid oak (not veneer) has stained just fine for me using the water-based Minwax pre-stain. I think the reason veneer splotches so badly is because the wood becomes saturated so quickly whereas solid wood can soak up more of the stain. This is just a theory though.
     
  6. Hank Frankenberg

    Hank Frankenberg Cinematographer

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    Jeffrey, I assumed you're using veneer, but if it's solid oak, Brian is correct, it takes stain better than veneer.
    Brian, wassup? Are you going to C.E.S. in January?
     
  7. Brian Bunge

    Brian Bunge Producer

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    Hank,
    Probably not. It's not in the budget this year, even though it can be a tax right off! [​IMG]
     
  8. Aaron_Smith

    Aaron_Smith Stunt Coordinator

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    While on the subject of finishing veneers- make sure that you allow time for your stain/finish to dry thoroughly between coats. I did't wait long enough in between coats, the wood got saturated, and it eventually swelled and released the contact cement. [​IMG]
     

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