Looking for a garage door opener - recommendations?

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Philip Hamm, Jan 4, 2002.

  1. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    I have a small single bay garage so I don't need mega power. Looking to spend as little as possible but don't want junk. [​IMG] Recommendations?
     
  2. Scott L

    Scott L Producer

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    Just chiming in cause I need one too.. Are there models that are marketed for low noise? I'm a night person in a suburban neighborhood who tends to take out their trash at 11:00pm or later. [​IMG]
     
  3. Alf S

    Alf S Cinematographer
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    I think your best bet would be going with a Sears Craftsman. Seem to last a lifetime, and not too pricey.

    Note: I would consider getting one with the new security code scrambling technology and an electronic lock feature.

    Our neighbors got broken into because someone used one of those universal garage remotes and drove around our neighborhood trying out different codes (that many older openers and some new ones have) until they got a door to open. They got several tools out of his garage, but didn't break into the main house.

    Alfer
     
  4. Steve Tannehill

    Steve Tannehill Ambassador

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    I went with the screw-based (as opposed to chain-based) Genie from Home Depot. It was a little pricey, though.

    - Steve
     
  5. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    I am soooo not sold on the screw type openers!! I remember their commercials where some moron was talking about "If you've ever seen a chain on a bicycle and it goes 'jam jam jam' well the screw is smooth". In fact I HAVE seen a chain on a bicycle and they're perfectly smooth unless you're changing gears. Same with my motorcycle chain. And the chains are incredibly strong. However, I have seen more than one screw crossthread and/or splinter due to heavy use. No thanks! Keep that sucker lubed! I'm going to my local Sears Hardware RIGHT NOW to take a look, I think they have a Craftsman low end model (All I need for my small door) on sale.
     
  6. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    I bought a genie screwdrive last summer for my apartment, 1/3rd horse or something (the smallest they make) and for my single car door it's great, pleanty of power, even when the door is frozen to the ground [​IMG]
    screw drive is the way to go, they are MUCH quieter than a chain drive, and they're easier to put together, and there's a lot less to adjust. (I have installed both)
    I think I paid about 80 for mine on sale, plus another 30 for a keypad so I can get into my garage without carrying an opener with me (nice to be able to get my bike out with full gear on and not fumble around for the damn opener)
     
  7. Steve Tannehill

    Steve Tannehill Ambassador

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    Well, the screw-type openers have worked for years for my friends and myself. Suit yourself.

    - Steve
     
  8. Eric Kahn

    Eric Kahn Guest

    Sears garage door openers are made by chamberlain right now

    I have a genie chain glide model but I admit that I bought the cheapest one availible and noise what not an issue because my garage is not attached to my house

    the quietest openers are some of the new tape drive models

    I think consumer reports just did a test of openers

    check out the library
     
  9. Steve_Ch

    Steve_Ch Supporting Actor

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    >>Our neighbors got broken into because someone used one of those universal garage remotes and drove around our neighborhood trying out different codes (that many older openers and some new ones have) until they got a door to open. They got several tools out of his garage, but didn't break into the main house.
     
  10. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    I can't speak for other brands, but the one I installed each opener comes with it's own code, and the opener "learns" the code for each remote and stores it by pressing a learn button on the opener then the button on the remote, rather than changing some dip switches on both.
     
  11. MikeSerrano

    MikeSerrano Second Unit

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    I have had both chain and screw-drive openers, and if I were to ever get a new opener, I'd go for the screw-drive. They're easier to install and maintain and (as pointed out above) quieter. And for those concerned about heavy use, I do much of my own car maintenance and do some personal carpentry work out of my garage, and open and close the main (8 foot steel sectional) door several times a day. Haven't had a problem with my screw-drive opener since I installed it 4 years ago.

    -Mike
     
  12. Steve_Ch

    Steve_Ch Supporting Actor

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    >>I can't speak for other brands, but the one I installed each opener comes with it's own code, and the opener "learns" the code for each remote and stores it by pressing a learn button on the opener then the button on the remote, rather than changing some dip switches on both.
     
  13. Eric Kahn

    Eric Kahn Guest

    all of the new genie and chamberlain (sears) openers use code switching remotes now

    you can even buy a new reciever with a code switching remote and retrofit most old units
     
  14. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Stunt Coordinator

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    I got a screw-drive (actually two) when I moved in to my house last year.
    Noise is not an issue, the drive itself is virtually silent, it's the doors themselves that cause the racket [​IMG] And from 10 feet away you can't even hear those.
     
  15. Dennis Reno

    Dennis Reno Supporting Actor

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    Quick question - can the openers that use code changing remotes be operated by the programable door openers in todays automobiles? I'm not talking about the remote that comes with the door, but the units that are hard wired in new cars and trucks.
     
  16. BrettB

    BrettB Producer

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    Have had a Genie screw drive for a little over a year now and have no complaints. Not sure if all the models do this, but mine opens about twice as fast as it closes. I guess they keep the closing speed slow for safety. Nice and quiet.

    Like Dave said, it's the doors that make the noise. After about six months my door was noisy as hell. Bought some white lithium grease in a spray can with the little plastic straw (like WD-40) and sprayed every hinge and point of friction. Good as new. Also, use WD-40 on the monster spring every few months.

    Has anyone noticed how the first time you use the opener after a power outage it moves in slow motion. By the second time it's back to normal. What causes that?
     
  17. Kevin Eckhardt

    Kevin Eckhardt Stunt Coordinator

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    Brett,

    The model you are referring to is in the Genie Excelerator line. I have one of these as well. Home Depot was running a special on the Genies ($50 installation vs. $100) in December. The guy who installed it explained that the first time it opens after a power outage it goes slowly so it can calibrate itself for your garage door. Once it figures out when to start and stop the screw it opens at the normal "double speed". So far mine has worked well and I like the fact that it opens faster than other openers.

    Kevin
     
  18. John Tillman

    John Tillman Supporting Actor

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    I've had a Home Depot Genie screw type for about six months and I like it. Nice and quiet as compared to different Sears models I've had (both chain & worm).

    The Genie replaced a craftsman, which had a fried circuit board from a passing storm. I did a Johnny-5 disassemble, took it to my Sears parts supply house, where they chuckled & said "sorry, can't help". I smiled back and said, "Guess a need a genie to fix this".
     
  19. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    OK, I'm in the market again, with a new house. I went to Lowe's recently and really was attracted to the belt drive openers. I know a good deal about drive mechanics and their individual wear and service needs from my many years of motorcycle maintenance. Chains and screws both need lubing. Belt drive is quieter and smoother than either, with virtually no maintenance requirements. Very attractive, but very expensive as well. I plan on owning this home for 30 years so I'm willing to spend what it takes to get something that will last.

    Any new recommendations?
     
  20. Shawn C

    Shawn C Screenwriter

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    I have a Martin garage door opener. I put it when when I got my new garage door. It's exceptionally quiet. It is a belt drive.

    The opener fob is nice since it transmits at 40MHZ, whis is different then most other openers. The problem is that you have to get your openers from them, and HomeLink won't work without an adapter.
     

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