Looking for +70" HDTV recommendations

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Kevin Goodwin, Sep 23, 2006.

  1. Kevin Goodwin

    Kevin Goodwin Stunt Coordinator

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    So, I was out to dinner with the wife last night, and we stopped into Best Buy to kill a few minutes before we headed out to the movies. This Best Buy store (Orland Park, IL) just added a Magnolia HT section, so we went over to check it out, as we're in the market for our first HD set for our soon-to-be-finished basement.

    I was planning on getting something like a 60"-65" set, but when my wife saw the 71" Samsung DLP set ($4800), she said we HAD to get a bigger one (Did I mention I love my wife?). The only other set of comparable size was a 73" Mitsubishi DLP ($4500), which was set up in the main showcase area, but actually had a poorer picture than the Samsung, IMHO.

    I liked the Samsung, but my main concern with DLP sets is the "rainbow" effect, which I'm afraid might drive me nuts after awhile. When I was viewing their DirecTV demo, I noticed some rainbow-y effects on a couple of images of satellites they were showing. I've never watched a DLP for an extended amount of time, so I'm not sure if it will bother me.

    Because of those concerns, I'm also very interested in LCoS sets, particularly the JVC ones, because Sony is probably out of my price range. I've looked around the internet a bit, but there's not a lot of reviews and user opinions on these sets. Anybody care to share their opinions of these sets, and possibly a good retailer (online or otherwise) with decent prices?
     
  2. frogpond

    frogpond Stunt Coordinator

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    I think everyone would love a wife like that! A few things; 1. How much is your complete budget? Don't forget if your going for the complete HT feel there's the rest of the componants. 2. Per square inch that is expensive. Budget wise and size wise I would look into a projector especially for the basement. A good pj will cost a third of the price and get you 70+ to 150+ if you want. Then you take that money you saved and buy all the rest of your gear then something for your wife.
     
  3. Kevin Goodwin

    Kevin Goodwin Stunt Coordinator

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    I've considered projectors, but I really want 1080p, and I don't want to turn down the lights to watch it. Also, my basement isn't that big, and I really don't need to go bigger than about 70".
     
  4. Alon Goldberg

    Alon Goldberg Screenwriter

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    I would definately recommend LCoS over Rear Projection LCD or DRP. LCoS provides the highest resolutions, the highest non-CRT contrast ratios, and the most artifact-free images of any display technology. Take a look at the JVC D-ILA and Sony SXRD Series. The models you may want to look at are:

    JVC HD-70FH97 and HD-70FN97 (or you may find the older HD-70FH96 with a reduced price). These models all offer full 1080p.

    Sony SXRD is most likely out of your budget.
     
  5. Jeff_CusBlues

    Jeff_CusBlues Supporting Actor

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    I bought a Toshiba 72MX195 DLP set about a month ago. HH Gregg had them on sale for $3999. I have been very pleased. It had everything I was looking for (2 HDMI, 1080p, etc.). The picture is great. I have also had no trouble using, calibrating or adjusting the set. The HD channels from Comcast look great (even though my Comcast is only 720p) and I love watching football and basketball on it. I'm still only SD DVD capable, but the movies look great as well. My wife also likes the set which is a big plus. Good luck with your search.

    Oh, from what I've read, some people observe the rainbow effect, but most don't. If you observe this, I would definitely consider another technology.
     
  6. Arthur S

    Arthur S Cinematographer

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    Kevin

    Since you already saw some rainbow effect, I would suggest you drop plans for DLP, you will be constantly looking for it.

    While I disagree with AG about which technology produces greater sharpness and better contrast using ANSI testing, at this point I'm not going to bother posting the link in which someone with 20+ years of experience, including as a reviewer, found that DLP has greater sharpness and contrast.

    I do agree with AG on one thing, you are a good candidate for the big JVC's.
     
  7. Alon Goldberg

    Alon Goldberg Screenwriter

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    This is Part IV by DisplayMate author Dr. Raymond Soneira, describing an in-depth comparison between CRT, LCD, plasma and DLP display technologies in order to analyze the relative strengths and weaknesses of each. In Part I we measured, analyzed, and compared primary specs like black level, color temperature, peak brightness, dynamic range, and contrast for each display technology. In Part II we continued with gray scale, gamma, primary chromaticities and color gamut to see how they all affect color and gray-scale accuracy. In we examined the complex world of display artifacts and how they affect image quality.

    http://www.extremetech.com/article2/...1747573,00.asp
    http://www.extremetech.com/article2/...1930271,00.asp

    And the winner is… LCoS, the new Reference Standard for overall image and picture quality, dethroning the CRT after more than 75 years at the top. An impressive achievement for a technology that has only recently started shipping in quantity. The new display technologies have now moved out from under the shadow of the CRT to stand on their own accomplishments.

    ---

    Dr. Raymond Soneira is President of DisplayMate Technologies Corporation of Amherst, New Hampshire. He is a research scientist with a career that spans physics, computer science, and television system design. Dr. Soneira obtained his Ph.D. in Physics from Princeton University, spent 5 years as a Long-Term Member of the world famous Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, another 5 years as a Principal Investigator in the Computer Systems Research Laboratory at AT&T Bell Laboratories, and has also designed, tested, and installed color television broadcast equipment for the CBS Television Network Engineering and Development Department. He has authored over 35 research articles in scientific journals in physics and computer science, including Scientific American.
     
  8. Alon Goldberg

    Alon Goldberg Screenwriter

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    Hi Arthur - DLP may certainly have some advantages in terms of sharpness and contrast, but I'm sure we can both agree that LCoS offers a greater overall picture quality under most lighting conditions.

    When purchasing a television it is important to analyze a broad range of features and specifications, in relation to the consumer's lighting environment and viewing distance, and not focus in on specific variables. Every technology has its benefits and its weaknesses, as I'm sure you will attest.

    In regards to contrast level, the new Sony SXRD XBR2 models claim a contrast of 10,000:1. Going one step further, the new Sony Pearl VPL-VW50 1080p SXRD projector offers a contrast of 15,000:1. LCoS has certainly taken enourmous leaps forward in the past 12 months.
     
  9. Alon Goldberg

    Alon Goldberg Screenwriter

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    Kevin - What is the viewing distance for your new set? According to Sound and Vision Magazine, the ideal viewing distance for a 70" 1080p set is 9.5 feet.

    Article: http://www.soundandvisionmag.com/tip...esolution.html
    Graph: http://www.soundandvisionmag.com/ass...alk2_large.jpg

    If you are further than 12 feet from the set, a 1080 source on a 1080p set will be indistinguishable from a 720 source scaled to 1080 because the eye will not be able to resolve what should be the extra sharpness.

    One of the nice things about LCoS is that their pixels are closer together than the typical LCD pixels are, allowing a shorter viewing distance without distraction by the picture elements.
     
  10. Arthur S

    Arthur S Cinematographer

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    Thanks for the links AG, I will have to read them [​IMG]
     
  11. Kevin Goodwin

    Kevin Goodwin Stunt Coordinator

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    Viewing distance is something I'm still trying to decide on. I'm going to have two rows of seating, but will usually be sitting in the first one. I was planning on about 11 feet to the front of the couch. I went last night to Tweeter, however, and watched a 1080p demo on their top of the line Mitsubishi 73", and decided I might want to move closer! WOW!
     
  12. Erb Superb

    Erb Superb Auditioning

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    Perhaps you might consider a front projecter such as Sony's new Pearl, the Vpl-VW50. Sony's msrp. is aprox. $5000. about what you might pay for a 73" rear pj Lcos. The bulb replacement costs are similar. A 73" rear pj will give you a 5' horz.screen yeilding aprox.14 square ft. A screen that is 7' horz. will give you aprox. 28 square ft., twice the screen size, high brightness for about the same cost. Using a 1.3 gain screen will give all viewing guests a good image. Only the additional cost of a screen needs to be considered, but you will be way ahead with a modern impressive WOW factor!
     
  13. frogpond

    frogpond Stunt Coordinator

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    Depending on pj and lighting situation you don't need to turn down the lights. During the day we have ambient sunlight streaming into the living room and while the picture is subdued it certainly isn't horrible or washed out. You had sai basement so I'm thinking the light can be a little more controled. 1080p? So what are you watching in 1080p? Certainly not hd broadcasts as they are usually in 720p or 1080i. The fledgling HDDVD or Bluray?
     
  14. jim.vaccaro

    jim.vaccaro Second Unit

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    That's a bunch of crap. I'll take a good CRT or even a plasma over LCOS tech any day of the week. Most anyone with a discerning eye would, AAMOF.
     
  15. Kevin Goodwin

    Kevin Goodwin Stunt Coordinator

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    frogpond,

    Tweeter had a 1080p HD-DVD demo playing on the Mitsubishi, and also a Blu-ray demo on their Samsung 71" DLP. The HD-DVD was spectacular. I'd always heard people talk about HD looking "so real you could reach through the screen and touch it," but had never seen an HD source that made me a believer.

    I also realize that you don't HAVE to turn down the lights when you're watching a projector, but I think we can all agree that turning them down helps. The projector route is just not for me, as I said, but I appreciate the suggestions, however OT they may be. You born-again projector converts are always hijacking threads to preach to the ignorant RPTV heathens. [​IMG]
     
  16. Sami Kallio

    Sami Kallio Screenwriter

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  17. TonyD

    TonyD Who do we think I am?
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    what the.....
     

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