Long Run

Discussion in 'Speakers & Subwoofers' started by Louisp, Sep 2, 2005.

  1. Louisp

    Louisp Stunt Coordinator

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    Due to the rooms configuration the speaker cable run to the Infinity Alpha 10 Surround Back is approximately 40'.

    I have 40' of flat Radio Shack 14 GA. flat speaker cable and several sections of Monster 12 GA which total approximately 40'.

    Here's my question - "Is it wiser to use the solid run of the RS flat 14 GA. or a spliced run of the Monster 12 GA.?"
     
  2. rob-h

    rob-h Second Unit

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    12ga is better for a longer run. As long as you solder the cable together it should not be a problem.
     
  3. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    Under 50ft 14ga should be OK. Solder would not be a requirement, IMO, but it would be better. I have one 30' run and it is butt spliced at one point because I had to legthen one when I moved to my new place and it sounds perfectly fine.
     
  4. Louisp

    Louisp Stunt Coordinator

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    Mr. Gracia, help me to better understand your reply. What is your actual recommendation, use the 14 ga. or the spliced 12 ga.?
     
  5. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    I was saying 14ga should work fine for what you are doing, as long as your speaker is 8 Ohms nominal and not lower, and if that means no splice, it would seem to be the way to go. 12ga would be a precaution and not a MUST. See this table to verify:

    http://www.roger-russell.com/wire/wire.htm#wiretable
     
  6. rob-h

    rob-h Second Unit

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    With multiple splices, using butt connectors would be a little silly. If there is ever a problem you have multiple connectors to check. Solder will also hold up better to being pulled on. While 14 will work fine, 12 would be better and you are prepared if you ever go to 4 ohms.
     
  7. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    I've had mine with a butt splice for over 3 years and never had it disconnect. If it DOES come apart, you didn't do it right... Butt splice connectors aren't exactly rocket science, while soldering correctly isn't a exactly child's play. I hate to say it, but a cold solder joint that isn't mechanically fixed is actually more likely to fail than a butt splice. In either case, you have the same GA of wire and you end up with essentially the same amount of contact area if done correctly. I used to solder everything too (my first job was as an electromechanical assembler for 3M), but for something like this, it just isn't something that I would say is NECESSARY.
     
  8. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    I agree with both John and Rob. [​IMG] It’s not necessary to solder, and you really need a high-powered iron or gun (50 watts or more) to solder 14- and 12-ga. wire. But on the other hand, multiple splices is a bit cheesy. If you have to do it that way, take care to do it right. You might want to check my Comprehensive Guide to Cable Splicing. Make sure you give each splice a sharp tug to make sure the connection holds.

    What hasn’t been mentioned yet is, if this run is in-wall or attic, you shouldn’t use this wire. You need CL-2 or –3 rated wire.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     

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