Listening to tweeters and midwoofer separately.

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Patrick Sun, Jul 18, 2001.

  1. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Studio Mogul

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    While doing some testing, I thought it'd be educational to just listen to the tweeter with music playing through it, and then do the same with the midwoofer (going through the crossover for each driver). I have dual-input terminal cups that makes this easy to do.
    It's just weird to listen to a tweeter by itself. It sounds so much "fainter" than the midwoofer (though it'll help you identify when the tweeter is working too hard/too low), but when you hook them back together, it's sort of amazing how the sound blends back into something coherent and musical.
    If you haven't done this, try it. It'll make you appreciate the midrange audio band reproduction all the more.
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  2. RonM

    RonM Extra

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    Patrick,
    Glad to hear my tweeter doesn't have a problem....just last night I had reassembled my drivers and with my ear very close to the tweeter and blocking the midwoofer with one hand I thought I had a problem with the tweeter because it was so faint. Didn't have time to check it out more but sounds like I'm not alone.
     
  3. Mark Seaton

    Mark Seaton Supporting Actor

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    Patrick,
    I fully agree, and I want to highlight another value to such evaluation. Often in a system you will hear a resonance, vibration, buzz, or whatever flaw and you may not know where to start in your attempt to correct it. A good means of narrowing things down is by finding a piece of material that highlights the fault. Now start by disconnecting the drivers you DON'T believe are at fault one by one. You should be able to isolate where your problem is coming from. If the problem goes away with disconnection of one driver, verify that the disonnected driver is truly at fault, and not the INTERACTION between two drivers. This works well to hunt down box resonances too.
    Mark Seaton
     
  4. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Studio Mogul

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  5. Steve_D

    Steve_D Second Unit

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    Wnat some more education?
    Listen to music with speakers set to small, sub yes, and disconnect your mains. In other words, 80HZ (or whatever) high pass, just listen to your sub. Very subtle also on 90% of music.
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