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List of 70mm Films on Blu-ray 1926-Present (1 Viewer)

Dr Griffin

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Yeah the film sensor is 2.20:1 at 6k resolution and the lens it uses is a proper 65mm lens. It is a legitimate 65mm camera, just doesn't use film.

So the question is is 70mm defined entirely by whether or not its shot on celuloid. With the 765, that no longer seems to be the case.
For the sake of this thread I thinks it's defined by the use of the word films.
Then someone can start a thread called 70mm Digital Cinema. There is always the possibility that some future movies shot entirely in digital could be released on 70mm film, why I wouldn't know, but maybe nostalgia or to get that look. 70mm digital cinema at very high frame rates like what Doug Trumbull is doing would elevate the medium even more, but it looks like that could take some time.
 

PMF

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"The Bible...In the Beginning" is not a film I've ever heard anyone discuss, outside of this forum.
I sense that its a buried film, to say the least, both as a motion picture and as a BD offering.
I saw it in the theaters upon its initial release; regretfully, though, not in 70mm.
Nonetheless, the imageries have stayed with me throughout the years.
I finally got my hands on the BD and was very, very impressed with how it looked and sounded;
being that, in all likelihood, this film never went through any restoration processes at all.
50 plus years later, I feel that the motion picture, itself, is actually one of John Huston's greatest achievements.
It is epic and yet it is understated. Nothing is pushed here.
Huston's work resists the expected indulgences of filmmaking that is so often inherent to the territory of its literary source.
Huston's execution; both as director and narrator; is thoughtful, unique and not at all like the other "Biblical" films that came before. Throw into the mix that Mr. Huston also portrays Noah in a most plausible and quiet way. When one considers that he wore three hats on this production, it is remarkable how seamless it all comes off; insomuch that it is The Bible which remains at the forefront, rather than the auteur and its all-star cast. And speaking of its all-star cast, I came to appreciate the lack of affectations within each of their portrayals; as this, too, can often be its own temptations for any of our great actors when espousing Shakespeare or any other material that predates the Bard.
IMO, "The Bible...In the Beginning" fares best when approached not so much as an entertainment, but rather as a meditation when which a story is told straight. Taken on its own terms, I feel that "The Bible...In the Beginning" succeeded on every front; despite its box-office take or its 50 years of traveling with such a small following and limited audience awareness.
For a title that I suspect to be underwhelming within its requests, Fox really did a great job with this BD.
 
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trajan007

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"The Bible...In the Beginning" is not a film I've ever heard anyone discuss, outside of this forum.
I sense that its a buried film, to say the least, both as a motion picture and as a BD offering.
I saw it in the theaters upon its initial release; regretfully, though, not in 70mm.
Nonetheless, the imageries have stayed with me throughout the years.
I finally got my hands on the BD and was very, very impressed with how it looked and sounded;
being that, in all likelihood, this film never went through any restoration processes at all.
50 plus years later, I feel that the motion picture, itself, is actually one of John Huston's greatest achievements.
It is epic and yet it is understated. Nothing is pushed here.
Huston's work resists the expected indulgences of filmmaking that is so often inherent to the territory of its literary source.
Huston's execution; both as director and narrator; is thoughtful, unique and not at all like the other "Biblical" films that came before.
IMO, "The Bible...In the Beginning" fares best when approached as a meditation.
For a title that I suspect to be underwhelming within its requests, Fox really did a great job with this BD.
The 70mm transfer is very impressive. The score by Toshiro Mayuzumi and recorded by Fred Hynes and Murry Spivack are also a plus. Now how about Fox releasing two more 70mm productions. STAR! and DOCTOR DOLITTLE I saw them in TODD-AO and would make impressive blurays.
 
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DP 70

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I have seen TBITB in 70mm quite a few times and its a shame the the 70mm DTS print and the Blu Ray do not have the Photographed in D-150 tag at the end as in the original prints.
 
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Paul Rossen

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My recollections...saw The Bible in D-150 at the Loew's State in NYC. Fox and the Loew's State were originally going to show The Bible in ToddAO 70mm.

Dimension 150 threatened a lawsuit. Thus, a huge curved screen was installed just for this Roadshow engagement. I felt the filmed dragged but was quite spectacular at the same time.

A few years later when Patton(also a D-150 film) opened at the Criterion in 70 mm they utilized their regular flat screen.
 
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PMF

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Albeit, we all agree. We know fully well how a 70mm film transferred to disc - be it BD or 4K UHD - is the mecca of sight and sound, when brought to our homes. And if we know it, then folks such as FOX surely must know it, as well. So why, in this age of 4K panels and 4K projection, aren't all of the 70mm films being embraced, readied and marketed? I know that monies invested and monies returned are crucial for the studios, but wouldn't this be a Field of Dreams case for "If you build it, they (the consumer) will come"? One group wants to market and sell the display options for home theaters; yet, it seems that the other group is not fully on board (or still not prepared). How can one side of the equation succeed without the other side also being in place, ready and available? Perhaps I'm being naïve; but it seems that both departments must be fully committed, on the same page and in sync, in order for it all to be mutually beneficial to both. Without that, it would be altogether wrong to proclaim the future of discs as something to be questioned. FOX seemingly has THE most 70mm films within their library; and their 70mm jewel-in-the-crown productions should be marketed and touted as one of their greatest legacies and exports, within this eye-catching age of 4K home entertainment.
 
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RolandL

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My recollections...saw The Bible in D-150 at the Loew's State in NYC. Fox and the Loew's State were originally going to show The Bible in ToddAO 70mm.

Dimension 150 threatened a lawsuit. Thus, a huge curved screen was installed just for this Roadshow engagement. I felt the filmed dragged but was quite spectacular at the same time.

A few years later when Patton(also a D-150 film) opened at the Criterion in 70 mm they utilized their regular flat screen.

Installing a curved screen was not all that was required for D-150. Installation of a 120 degree screen, masking, lenses, projection equipment, etc. See detailed information starting on this page. Very similar to 70mm Cinerama (except the Cinerama screens were usually wider, around 2.6:1 instead of 2.2:1)
 

Paul Rossen

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Installing a curved screen was not all that was required for D-150. Installation of a 120 degree screen, masking, lenses, projection equipment, etc. See detailed information starting on this page. Very similar to 70mm Cinerama (except the Cinerama screens were usually wider, around 2.6:1 instead of 2.2:1)

Since The Bible was the first movie in D-150 I'm quite sure that all the requisite installations etc were completely followed up by Mr. Vetter of D-150 and the Loew's people as well as Fox. If I recall correctly the situation was pretty dicey before the resolution.

As I recall it the screen was quite huge and much larger than the screen at
the Rivoli as well as the UA 150 in Syosset. But of course these are memories from a long time ago.
 
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ahollis

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Since The Bible was the first movie in D-150 I'm quite sure that all the requisite installations etc were completely followed up by Mr. Vetter of D-150 and the Loew's people as well as Fox. If I recall correctly the situation was pretty dicey before the resolution.

As I recall it the screen was quite huge and much larger than the screen at
the Rivoli as well as the UA 150 in Syosset. But of course these are memories from a long time ago.

UA built a handful of 150 cinemas based on Dr. Vetter's instructions. Dallas, Syosset, Chicago, San Juan were a few of the cities. He continued to be a consultant for United Artists Theatres for projection and sound until the late 90's. I had the pleasure of meeting him several times during my years with UA.
 

Paul Rossen

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UA built a handful of 150 cinemas based on Dr. Vetter's instructions. Dallas, Syosset, Chicago, San Juan were a few of the cities. He continued to be a consultant for United Artists Theatres for projection and sound until the late 90's. I had the pleasure of meeting him several times during my years with UA.


Needless to say the UA 150 in Syosset was my favorite theater outside of Manhattan. Saw many 70mm films there over the years it was in existance. One week I saw Patton in 70mm at the UA Syosset and then the following week at the UA 150 in Syosset. Assumed it was the same print. Both presentations easily beat the original roadshow at the Criterion in NYC.
 

cinemiracle

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Since The Bible was the first movie in D-150 I'm quite sure that all the requisite installations etc were completely followed up by Mr. Vetter of D-150 and the Loew's people as well as Fox. If I recall correctly the situation was pretty dicey before the resolution.

As I recall it the screen was quite huge and much larger than the screen at
the Rivoli as well as the UA 150 in Syosset. But of course these are memories from a long time ago.

The Rivoli had D150 installed but they never advertised any 70mm films as being shown in that process. I doubt that they ever used the full D150 screen.I was going to see THE BIBLE when I was in NYC but gave it a miss as I had worked in a 70mm cinema in New Zealand and the film bored me to death. The film was titled "THE BIBLE ... in the beginning". It was Fox's intention to make a much longer film and include more Bible stories. For obvious reasons they didn't.
 
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RolandL

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Needless to say the UA 150 in Syosset was my favorite theater outside of Manhattan. Saw many 70mm films there over the years it was in existance. One week I saw Patton in 70mm at the UA Syosset and then the following week at the UA 150 in Syosset. Assumed it was the same print. Both presentations easily beat the original roadshow at the Criterion in NYC.

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images
 
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DP 70

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Its such a shame we have to put up with smaller screens today and what lovely cinemas we used to have, the D-150 cinemas looked fantastic.
I go past the Odeon Marble Arch every day and its now covered in scaffolding so sad.
 
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PMF

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On the day I finally have enough money for a designated home theater, I should like to bring along with me Mr. Vetter, Dr. Griffin, ahollis, Roland L, DP 70, Paul Rossen, cinemiracle, davidmatychuk, RMajidi, OliverK, trajan007, David Crawford, Matt Hough, Ronald Epstein, Stephen Pi, Robert Harris and Mr. Upton for their collective input, as I make that Utopian purchase; with an emphasis on 70mm to disc presentations.
What a group conversation that would be within the store of Robert Zohn.:popcorn:

P.S.
If anyone from this 70mm thread doesn't see their name listed, don't worry; you're invited, too.
No exclusions here, my friends.
No exclusions, whatsoever.
After all, its just a dream sequence, anyway.;)
 
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OliverK

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UA built a handful of 150 cinemas based on Dr. Vetter's instructions. Dallas, Syosset, Chicago, San Juan were a few of the cities. He continued to be a consultant for United Artists Theatres for projection and sound until the late 90's. I had the pleasure of meeting him several times during my years with UA.

I tremendously enjoyed the two movies shot in the D-150 process and I hope that he liked the fact that both of them got good to very good Blu-ray releases and that Fox struck new prints of them. I even bought one of the super curvulon lenses off ebay for our film club, it is a magnificent looking lens!
http://www.in70mm.com/newsletter/2004/68/super_curvulon/index.htm
 

PMF

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Philip
I tremendously enjoyed the two movies shot in the D-150 process and I hope that he liked the fact that both of them got good to very good Blu-ray releases and that Fox struck new prints of them. I even bought one of the super curvulon lenses off ebay for our film club, it is a magnificent looking lens!
http://www.in70mm.com/newsletter/2004/68/super_curvulon/index.htm
Greetings OliverK,
Did I miss this information from an earlier Post?
Are you saying that the current BD's of "THE BIBLE...in the beginning" and "Patton" were transferred from newly struck prints?
 

PMF

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Of RAH's 2013 review concerning "Hello, Dolly!" on BD; he wrote that this title would be a worthy "short list" candidate on the day that 4K discs become available. Its 70mm. Its FOX. And its three years later. Hopefully, "Hello, Dolly!" will soon become a 4K UHD reality.
 

PMF

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Is the information for a D-150 presentation existing within the current BD editions of "Patton" and "The Bible"?
Not having a designated home theater at this time, I wonder of those who do have been able to replicate this scope and process.
 
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PMF

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Philip
I would like to see a Best-to-Worst Chances list of the unreleased 70mm titles being restored and/or making it to BD.
What are the obstacles that each of the remaining American/British films are facing?
Example:
"The Alamo" desperately needs a restoration and is being held captive by MGM;
whereas "Star!" seems to have little report of any problems, whatsoever.
Anyone up to the task?
Or would this need to become a separate thread?
 

DP 70

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The D-150 credit is in the opening titles on Patton BD but not anywhere on The Bible BD
Its a pity these were not released in Smilebox.
 
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