Line Voltage Drop shuts off my Denon 3802?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Bryan Acevedo, Dec 4, 2001.

  1. Bryan Acevedo

    Bryan Acevedo Second Unit

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    Quick question:

    I have the Denon AVR 3802, and last night, I was working with my brother-in-law on installing some floor trim around the media niche he just built me. We were listening to a CD (so my Denon DVD player was on as well) and I was recording a show with the VCR and Satellite receiver. All of this is plugged into a Monster Power Conditioner (HTS 1000).

    He plugged in his air compressor for the nail gun, on the same circuit as my HT. I was out in the garage cutting some pieces of the trim, and I came in and the compressor was running (damn they are loud). What was nice is that I put my ears up to the speakers, and there was absolutely no noise being generated by the compressor. However, when it kicked on, my receiver shut down and came back on almost immediately. My DVD player, VCR and sat receiver didn't budge. Well of course seeing that freaked me out and I turned it off immediately so it wouldn't fry anything.

    My questions are:

    Did I do any damage to my receiver? I don't think there was a spike, but more like a brown-out, but can this hurt the receiver? It came back on and was playing fine, so it seems that all is well.

    Why did it shut off (and not the other components). I wasn't playing it that loud, and I thought the HTS 1000 was supposed to help with this? Does the Denon detect that the voltage wasn't high enough and shut itself down to protect it? Or was it just not enough power to keep it running (like a brown out)?

    This compressor was a dual tank, contractor type professional one (pretty big and heavy) so I imagine it was putting a good drain on the circuit (the lights dimmed when it came on).

    Bryan

    P.S. I know for a fact there are no shorts in the system, etc. It has never done this before, and only did it when the compressor kicked on. Once it was on, the receiver was fine. It also wasn't overheating, as we only had it on for like 20 minutes, and I have had it on for hours without any problems before. Just wanted to get these assumptions out of the way, so people don't ask me to check the wiring and ventilation, etc. I know it had to do with the line voltage, but just curious as to why.
     
  2. John Royster

    John Royster Screenwriter

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    I'll take a gander.

    I would think your receiver is the only component that really has any kind of protection circuit. Maybe when your voltage dropped below the threshold of the protection and it set off.
     
  3. Grant B

    Grant B Producer

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    I came to know Brown outs on a personal & frequent level Living in CA with PG & E power. I ended up buying a UPS by Tripp that solved my preamp problems associated with voltage drops.

    Much cheaper than that monster thingy
     
  4. SamRoza

    SamRoza Stunt Coordinator

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    There was almost an identical post earlier with an Outlaw 1050.

    "Protection" circuitry is usually another word for your amp being too hot, or blowing an internal fuse. It usually won't shut the unit off and allow you to turn it right back on.

    I don't think you did anything to your unit, but, like happened with the outlaw, make sure you don't have any shorts at your speakers! That was his problem, and I'd just make sure of that.

    Sam
     
  5. Bryan Acevedo

    Bryan Acevedo Second Unit

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    Thanks Sam, but in my original post I pointed out that this was not from a short or overheating - I know that for a fact! I use all banana plugs on every speaker and amp connection, and I was playing the volume at a pretty reasonable level. I have played it at this volume before for hours at a time with no problem. Nothing had changed in the setup. It only happened when the compressor kicked in, not during a loud scene or something like that. I know what can happen when a short is present or overheating, and this was definitely not it.

    What I was wondering is what actually made it shut off. Was it that the line voltage dropped so low that the receiver just couldn't stay on? Or did the receiver detect that line drop and actually shut itself off to protect itself. To me there is a difference, as the latter makes sure nothing was damaged, and the former means it just lost power.

    I am just going to assume it detected it and shut itself off. My other components all stayed on, so I know the voltage was still enough to run them, but the receiver is going to pull a lot more current than a VCR.

    Bryan
     
  6. Bryan Acevedo

    Bryan Acevedo Second Unit

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    Thanks Mark - that's what I figured. And so far, it doesn't seem to have any problems with the DSP's (at least PLII Music). I would assume if it can play that (that is the mode it was in when it shut off) all should be fine. Basically, there is no difference between this and my electricity going off and back on, and if my $1200 receiver can't handle that, then we have a problem. Also, since it is plugged into a Monster Power Conditioner, it would be fully covered under their replacement policy.

    By the way - I like your signature - it's the truth! People have no problem with ugly people making their money off of their brains, so why should people care if dumb people make their money off of their looks!

    Bryan
     

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