LFE High Cut Filter

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by MikeDierbeck, Aug 13, 2002.

  1. MikeDierbeck

    MikeDierbeck Agent

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2002
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi-

    I have an STR-DE975 Sony receiver with JBL S38's as the two front speakers, JBL S-CENTERii, rear speakers, and SVS 20-39PCi.

    On my receiver, it has a function where I can individualy set each speakers crossover (I have the SVS one disabled before anybody asks). I have all of the speakers at 80Hz, but have the LFE HIGH CUT FILTER > STD (which is 120Hz) because that's what the manual has. Is this the correct setting?

    Also, would there be any harm in setting the crossover of the center to 90Hz and the fronts to 70Hz? Or even keep the center at 80Hz and drop the fronts to 70Hz?

    What would you suggest if you had my system?

    Thanks

    Mike
     
  2. Dan Joy

    Dan Joy Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2001
    Messages:
    758
    Likes Received:
    0
    Mike, I have the DA5ES which has the same settings. As for LFE High Cut Filter, I asked this months ago and never really received an answer so mine is set at 120(standard) also.
    As for my crossovers, I have them set for the fronts at 1 octave above their lowest spec'd setting for individual speakers. My fronts are at 70(spec'd down to 35) center 80 and surrounds at 80. After calibrating with Avia, this worked well with my SVS25-31PCi.
    Good Luck!
     
  3. JackS

    JackS Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2002
    Messages:
    634
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dan- I think your settings are correct. I've set mine the same. Running the sub as a full range speaker and then correctly limiting the input through the crossover settings of the mains cen/surr. This allows for all LFE info plus the correct distribution through re-direction from the remaining speakers. There are probably other ways to set up a sub which may be dependant on associated speakers and equipment but in general, I beleive this way is optimal 99% of the time.
     

Share This Page