Lets see them blame THIS on file sharing!

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Eric_L, Dec 29, 2005.

  1. Eric_L

    Eric_L Screenwriter

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    While reading this article I had an epiphany.

    "U.S. album sales were down about 7 percent as 2005 drew to a close"
    I'm about sick of the recording industry blaming their troubles on 'pirates' and making up ridiculous numbers to make their case. Though this article does not mention pirates - plenty more do.
    1/3 music CDs sold are pirated
    Each year, the industry loses about $4.2 billion to piracy worldwide
    (both of which appear to be total bunk. )

    Lets look at another old media;

    Since 2000, Saturday night network TV viewership has dropped 39 percent, compared to 16 percent for the seven nights in total, according to Nielsen Media Research.

    Now, unless people are pirating their TV shows this does not add up. Both media are in decline because of new options and poor quality - not illegal file swappers. Pirate swappers are just a boogie-man made up by RIAA executives desperate to keep their jobs - and if they have to sue and bankrupt every computer illiterate mother just to do it, they will.

    Now, if they were real men who could accept reality rather than create excuses, they would realize that they;

    1) are no more capable of setting the music trends than Detroit was of 'telling people what they want' back in the 70s fuel crisis.
    2) Are facing competition not from 'pirates' (aarrh!) but whole new forms of media.
    3) They, like every other business, must innovate and adapt to survive.
    4) Alienating and suing the daughters mothers and sisters of their consumers is not likely to win them more sales.
    5) Same goes for installing malicious software without consent.

    Take a look at DVD sales - the whole time CD sales have been on the decline DVD sales have gone up - alot! Same for video games. How has the RIAA responded to this challenge during this period? By suing 12 year old girls! That'll fix the problem!

    Anyway - I am certain not to be buying CDs anytime soon. My boys will soon be in the demographic that buys the most CDs. I will be looking for alternate legal music sources for them unless the music industry wakes up real soon.

    What do you think? Is the RIAA playing fair or are they overreacting to compensate for their lack of vision?
     
  2. Greg_S_H

    Greg_S_H Executive Producer

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    I don't argue your main point, but:


    TV show trading is thriving on the internet. The ads are not included, and it could ultimately impact future DVD sales. That would be the argument for going after TV show pirates, anyway.
     
  3. Eric_L

    Eric_L Screenwriter

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    Maybe so, but I don't think the trouble has been widespread nor flourishing since 2000. Nor do you see ABC sednig goon-squads of lawyers after grandmothers.

    It is more likely that they realize that it can increase their viewership through another media type.hence; this.
     
  4. Malcolm R

    Malcolm R Executive Producer

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    The Music Industry is learning that their customers are fed up with being forced to purchase an entire album to get one song they like. Since the labels stopped selling singles years ago, we've had little choice. But now with digital downloads, people are able to cherry-pick the songs they want without having to pay for a full album of dreck. Seems pretty obvious to me when just a few years ago we had albums selling 10 million copies or more, and now the biggest hits of the year are barely moving 5 million.

    And the television industry has all but abandoned Saturday nights, generally always running repeats or old movies, so why wouldn't ratings drop? People have TIVO's to timeshift shows, they don't need repeats. Why watch a network movie with commercials when you can pop in a DVD? If they'd program something worth watching, people would watch. But they have to lure the audience back; they cannot expect the audience will just show up first.
     
  5. ChrisHeflen

    ChrisHeflen Supporting Actor

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    I agree with Malcom on this one too.
    The so called artists of today can't put out a full decent album to merit it's purchase price. Plus, if you go into Boarders Books, they want like $18 for a cd. I don't know how they can justify that. The prices should be dropping not climbing. I know one can usually go to Best Buy and find it for $13 or so, but come on!

    A few years back I read an article in "Stereophile" and they talked about a record label who picked up what they thought was an up and coming star from Europe. They flew her over gave her this million+ dollar deal, bought her her own pad, car, etc... Then flew her father over and gave him his own pad.
    To make a long story short, she sold a smidge over 6,000 copies of her album. I think that was the end for her if I remember correctly.
    So who pays for that? We do. Take for instance Janet Jackson, (Miss Jackson if your nasty). After her giant multi-mega hit Rythm Nation cd, she signs a 80 million dollar deal and puts out cheese.
    Maybe labels need to re-think fronting these artist 80 mill, and try saying "we'll cover your recording costs and such, but you don't sell any records, you don't get to ride around in that Escalade, or live in that giant house".

    These labels might need to realize that we the consumer are sick of being taken for a ride. And it isn't in an Escalade. (least not for me).
     
  6. Ravi K

    Ravi K Supporting Actor

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    Maybe the boom of TV-on-DVD is a sign that people would rather watch old shows they've already seen than whatever's on TV right now, aside from rare current hits like Lost and 24.

    Right now I kind of feel like the kids in Springfield when Itchy and Scratchy became nice and lame. They started playing outside, building forts, etc [​IMG]
     
  7. Jeff D Han

    Jeff D Han Supporting Actor

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    Good reference to the Itchy and Scratchy and Marge episode,
    Ravi.[​IMG]

    IMO the record industry is on the decline because of the
    ridiculously high retail prices for a CD (I absolutely
    refuse to pay $18 for a CD), and the days of the super
    group are over (the trend in music today seems to be a
    bunch of one-and-done artists). It seems to me that there
    isn't a group out there today that can put out a string
    of good albums like groups of the past, so the anticipation
    of a future release by a group isn't what it used to be.
    The record industry is looking at their decline with a
    popular theme these days- place the blame elsewhere
    instead of looking close to home. [​IMG]
     
  8. Todd Hochard

    Todd Hochard Cinematographer

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    More and more, I find myself choosing the original alternative to music- silence.[​IMG]
     
  9. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    I agree too. With the boom of DVD, why spend MORE money on a crappy CD when you can get a DVD for a much cheraper price? The only way CD sales can increase, they have to lower their prices to at least $5-$8. I mean, I'm still paying the same price for a CD as I did in the 80's!!!!

    DVD is killing the CD plain and simple!
     
  10. Eric_L

    Eric_L Screenwriter

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  11. ThomasC

    ThomasC Lead Actor

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    One example:

    Much Ado About Nothing DVD - $9.99 at Amazon

    Much Ado About Nothing CD Soundtrack - $11.98 at Amazon

    What the **** is up with that?
     
  12. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    Van Halen Live: Right Here, Right Now (on Amazon):
    DVD = $12.99
    CD = $19.99
     
  13. Mike Heenan

    Mike Heenan Second Unit

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    Ive actually seen articles where they say DVD sales are dropping. Keep in mind that CDs were around before DVDs at least 12 something years, so to make a comparison seems unfair, as DVD is fairly new.
     
  14. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    The price of DVD's has dropped DRAMATICALLY since they first came out. CD's never really had the same drop in price.

    p.s. Another thing to note is the popularity of the CD caught on a lot quicker than the popularity of the DVD. That's proobably why the price never really came down on CD's. DVD didn't come out super strong, so they lowered the price and it BOOMED, but they still keep the prices reasonable. They never increased them due to the gain in popularity.

    But the thing is...now that CD sales are down, they figure they'll blame file sharing on it instead of doing what DVD did and lowered the price to get it's popularity back up.
     
  15. Ravi K

    Ravi K Supporting Actor

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    IIRC it's the rate of growth that is dropping and not DVD sales themselves.

    If you're lucky, you can find CDs for $10 on release week. Secondhand CD stores around me price their used CDs for about $9. Not even worth it. I bought Boogie Nights for $10 recently. A two and a half hour film with an extras disc. That's about 7-8 hours of content, including the commentaries, deleted scenes, and the film itself.
     
  16. Jason Seaver

    Jason Seaver Lead Actor

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    Well, not that I necessarily support this line of logic, but a CD often gets more use than a DVD - compare the average number of times you've played a given CD in your collection to the average number of times you've watched a given DVD, and I wouldn't be surprised if the first number was two or three times the second number. The CD gets put on in the background, or ripped to the computer, or played in a portable device, but the DVD is often only used when someone can sit down and watch the movie giving it their whole attention.

    (NOTE: Your usage may be different. For the typical person, though, this is probably pretty close to accurate)

    In a certain sense, a CD is "worth" more than a DVD because we get more use out of it, which is why we put up with the counter-intuitive higher price.

    Not that I think the media companies actually think that way - I think they're mostly just responding to the fact that DVD sales drop much more precipitously over time than those of CDs, so need to have their desirability goosed by periodically dropping the price.

    Part of the reason for that, I suspect, is that few movies are as identifiably part of a collection as albums are - a person who discovers a certain musician will wind up buying many of his albums, but fans of an actor/filmmaker aren't really building collections. So thirty-year-old Randy Newmans albums are more likely to be purchased than thirty-year-old Jack Nicholson movies, since not as many people are trying to get a complete run, so to speak.

    (I also suspect this is why prices of TV show collections don't drop as fast as movies - the newer releases help drive sales of the older ones, much like new albums point people at a musician's catalog)
     
  17. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    Then why are video game discs up to $65?
     
  18. Garrett Lundy

    Garrett Lundy Producer

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    In the last 10 years CD has lost sales due to two competing entertainment option not available before. DVD and High-speed internet porn. MMORPGs are a close 3rd.
     
  19. Jason Seaver

    Jason Seaver Lead Actor

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    Because people will pay that.

    I'm not saying frequency of use is the only rationale, but I think over time people will feel they got $18 worth of use out of the CD they bought for that price, while I know there are a ton of movies on my shelf that I haven't gotten $18 worth of use from and probably never will. Apparently, people figure they'll get $65 worth of use out of a videogame (apparently interactive use is worth more than passive use).
     
  20. MarkHastings

    MarkHastings Executive Producer

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    Yeah, and considering CD sales are dropping, instead of realizing that people are no longer willing to pay that price, they go and blame other areas.
     

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