Legal Question concerning Xbox

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Bill Griffith, Jan 9, 2003.

  1. Bill Griffith

    Bill Griffith Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2002
    Messages:
    581
    Likes Received:
    0
    You buy an Xbox ( you now own it)

    If you go in and modify your Xbox to behave like a computer

    ie. give it the ability to download none xbox information onto its hard drive, like Music

    and change out the Hard drive to a larger one.

    what about enabling the DVD progressive scan playing ability of the Xbox also.

    you do this for you Xbox in your home, is there any legal action Microsoft can take against you.

    Now say you do this for a friends console, or you post the information on how to do it on the internet. Whats the legal situation here?
     
  2. Iain Lambert

    Iain Lambert Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 1999
    Messages:
    1,345
    Likes Received:
    0
    I believe that its the case (as /. would say, IANAL) that you can do all that to your own box, though Microsoft reserve the right to count is as breaking warranty and to refuse to let you have Live.

    Once you start telling others, however, you hit the problem that most of that involves circumventing the copy protection methods, and a fair bit requires getting hold of copyrighted Microsoft object code in order to run dashboards that accept unsigned code. Both of those actions are illegal.
     
  3. John Kilroy

    John Kilroy Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 1997
    Messages:
    195
    Likes Received:
    0
    Remember, the act of circumventing any encryption, even in the pursuit of fair use, is now illegal, thanks to the record companies and the RIAA.
     
  4. Iain Lambert

    Iain Lambert Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 1999
    Messages:
    1,345
    Likes Received:
    0
    I thought it was just informing others, or "distribution of circumvention tools" that was the illegal part. I must be wrong, then.
     
  5. Bill Griffith

    Bill Griffith Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2002
    Messages:
    581
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think I understand what your saying.

    Your saying the code required to unlock/allow the console to behave like a computer (ie save external info onto the harddrive) is propriatary code owned by Microsoft that no onu else should have access to. And if you have this code you had to have gotten it illegaly, unless you figured it out your self, in which case you would just void the warrenty of the unit.
     
  6. John Kilroy

    John Kilroy Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 1997
    Messages:
    195
    Likes Received:
    0
    Andrew Huang at MIT's AI laboratory severely hacked the Xbox and published a paper detailing the "secret" boot block that decrypts the kernel bootloader. While he did not do anything with serious ramifications, like cracking the RSA 576-bit key that Xbox encrypts with, he did provide a roadmap of how the Xbox uses encryption at boot time. Microsoft legal representatives contacted him and asked that he remove certain bits of it from the web, a request with which he complied. This was before the law I cited above was implemented.

    He still has quite a bit on the web about his Xbox hacking experiences, but the piece Microsoft took exception to is gone.

    The question is, if you were to hack the Xbox, and you got the call from Microsoft legal, what would you do? Would you would abandon the project? If so, does that affect your decision to attempt it at the outset?
     

Share This Page