Layer Changes?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mark Harrison, Nov 14, 2001.

  1. Mark Harrison

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    Everytime I put any DVD into my Pioneer 333 player and start the previews, there is an annoying scramble of the picture that lasts for less than a second between rapid scene changes of the previews and the words "unusable signal" appear on my screen. What's going on and how do I fix it?
    It does not happen when I watch the movie just the previews and sometimes the different set-up screens for extras and what not.
     
  2. Brian McHale

    Brian McHale Supporting Actor

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    I had similar problems which I now attribute to my cheap RCA TV. I used to get the "Unusable Signal" indication during trailers and other extra features, but it was when it happened during a movie that I took it seriously. I actually returned the disc, and the problem occurred with the replacement also. The problem seemed to be set off by particularly bright sequences, like explosions or fires.
    I had been using the S-video input. When I went back to the composite video input, the problem went away. I figure when I eventually upgrade my equipment to a high quality TV/monitor and progressive DVD player, I won't have to worry about it.
     
  3. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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  4. Mark Harrison

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    What a coincidence!!!! I use the S-Video connection on my 32" RCA Colortrack. I guess I will just have to tell my wife that its obvious now that we need a new TV. After all this one is 4 years old!
    ps- I don't know if the electronics are cheap or not but I find the picture very very good when set up with Avia.
     
  5. Ryan Wright

    Ryan Wright Screenwriter

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    This is the result of an overzealous signal detection chip. Old TVs would just display whatever you threw at them. At some point in the early 90's, TV manufacturers decided they should give you a nice (usually blue) background instead of snow if there was a lack of a signal. They've got a process that sits there and looks for a problem with the signal. When it gets one, it switches to the "pretty background." They also like to tie this in with the mute control so that you don't hear the static noise.
    This process is imperfect and in many sets will produce false detections. It especially causes problems with any sort of quick changes - multiple quick cuts from scene to scene will do it, as will significant lighting changes in the film. I've personally always hated this sort of thing; just show me the damn snow and give me the noise. I don't know if the snow was scaring little old ladies or what, but the whole idea is a bad one.
    ------------------
    -Ryan ( http://www.ryanwright.com )
    Before you criticize someone, walk a mile in their shoes.
    That way, when you do criticize them, you'll be a mile away and you'll have their shoes.

    [Edited last by Ryan Wright on November 14, 2001 at 05:48 PM]
     

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