latex primer ok?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by PaulDF, Nov 13, 2002.

  1. PaulDF

    PaulDF Second Unit

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    I am by no means a painter, so I have a dumb question... Can I use a latex primer under a "Colors in Plastic" paint (oil based?). I have a can of good quality primer and would like to use it on my MDF box. Thanks.
     
  2. Mel Silva

    Mel Silva Agent

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    Paul,
    I'm no expert, but I would try and remain consistant with your paint bases. Use the latex primer under latex paint and use an oil bsaed primer for your oil base paint. I believe that shellac and denatured alcohol based primers like KILZ can be used with either.
     
  3. KurtJ

    KurtJ Stunt Coordinator

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    Yup, stick with a consistent paint type; either latex or oil-based.
     
  4. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    When in doubt, always test the paint combination on scrap before using it on the final product.
     
  5. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    The way I understand it: You can put latex over oil, but you should avoid oil over latex.

    The reason, I believe (waiting for a painter to chime in here) is the oil paint seals in any moisture that may be left in the latex (paint may feel dry to the touch, but may take several days to fully dry) and may not allow it to dry properly.

    I could argue this, because I had painted the back panel of my sub with latex PVC primer and then inadvertantly covered it with an oil based enamel. However, the latex was allowed to dry for several days in a hot garage.. it turned out fine.
     
  6. Dave Milne

    Dave Milne Supporting Actor

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    I never use latex primers for anything (but house painting) because they don't sand worth a darn. Half of the reason for using a primer in a fine finish painting process is to smooth surface imperfections --which requires sanding.
     
  7. Al Garay

    Al Garay Stunt Coordinator

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    For MDF, go with oil. The finish will be more durable. And the sheen will look rich and smooth. Also, with a high-quality oil paint like top of the line Benjamin Moore or Sherwin Williams, you will get great results with no brush marks. It is easy to paint. Though, it does smell stronger with all the volatile agents (I think they are called). And you have to use mineral spirits to clean up.

    I find that it is worth it when doing molding and wood furniture. You cannot go wrong with buying Benjamin Moore's undercoater enamel oil primer and their Impervo satin finish. They also have a Impervo Ultra Gloss that is great for high-use furniture.

    Latex to me just looks dull in comparison.

    Al Garay
     
  8. PaulDF

    PaulDF Second Unit

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    Thanks guys, I realize this is a pretty simple issue. I think I'll look for some enamel or oil primer in hopes of a smoother finish. I was planning on using a roller (6mil), with a black gloss enamel, since I have 40 sq/feet to cover (yeah, its a monster box). How will this work out, or should I use a brush or sprayer? I had thought a bit of texture would be fine but now am not sure with it being a high gloss paint. Ideas?
     
  9. Al Garay

    Al Garay Stunt Coordinator

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    I have best results when using a small roller to lay down the paint followed by a good brush to smooth it out. Oil is nice to work with because it does not dry as fast. And the brush marks disappear. You need to use quality roller and brushes.

    The name of the roller that I like is called Whizz Roller System, Premium Sponge. Comes in 4" and 6". The paint shop that carries Benjamin Moore or Sherwin Williams may have it. I have seen them at Lowes. They are very good for laying down a smooth coat of paint, recommended for cabinets and furniture if you are not using a paint sprayer.

    The brushes need to be soft 100% natural bristles. Prefer Ox hair. Purdy is a brand available in the West coast has one called OX-O Angular. Excellent brush. Back East, you may find one made by JR Edwards or Corona. Those are excellent also. Expect to pay around $18+ for a quality brush. Clean it up with mineral spirits and it will last as long as you want (to clean it).

    Another thing, Use long strokes and do not go over spots again. And use plenty of paint. That's where the roller helps to put the paint down, and then a long brush stroke to even it out.

    I'm not a painter. I'm a software engineer who is too cheap to pay professional painters. So, I learn from doing it a few times.

    Good luck,

    Al
     

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