Last chance before drywall- please review

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by ericSchirm, Jul 7, 2004.

  1. ericSchirm

    ericSchirm Agent

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    I just ordered the drywall so this is my last chance for any changes. Please let me know if I am missing anything.

    The room is 18.5 x 12.5 x (10ft ceilings but will have to drop 1 ft because of pipes, frame & sheetrock) with a storage closet and a double window. I haven't decided on a projector yet (4805 or Z2) so I am sure of the exact location of the ceiling mount. I would like atleast a 98" to 105" screen. My front row (old movie theater seats) will only be approx 9' and then my back row will be at 15' (6' of riser- will that be enough room for theater seating?).

    I have insulated the walls and the ceiling joists with R19 insulation and then a layer of roofing material. The ceiling was then framed and another layer of r13 insulation on top.

    - Should I put another layer of R13 insulation in the ceiling frame?

    I have pre-wired for a 8.1 setup. I also have RG6 runs in each corner of the room for a sub (most likely front left corner). My AV rack (dedicated 20 amp outlet) is built in the wall and I have conduit pipes running from the AV rack to where the projector will be located in the ceiling for wiring. I also have a dedicated 20amp outlet for the projector in the ceiling (I also put one on the back wall just in case).

    I plan on building a riser for the back row so I have a 12/2 romex coming out where the riser will be for future rope lights. I also wired RCA/s-video from the riser position to the projector location.

    I will have 4 wall scones and 5 can lights wired to remote controlled dimmers (on a dedicated 20 amp outlet).

    One more addition- IR repeater system. I am ordering a Xantech 291 kit.


    What am I missing?

    THANKS IN ADVANCE FOR THE INPUT
     
  2. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    The only thing that jumps out at me is the dedicated circuit for the lighting. Make sure it’s not on the same phase (service leg) as the circuits for the electronics. If it is, you might get interference from the dimmers coming through your speakers.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  3. Parker Clack

    Parker Clack Schizophrenic Man
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    How about some pictures of your HT as it is getting built.

    Sounds like you have a great layout for sure.

    Parker
     
  4. ericSchirm

    ericSchirm Agent

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    Wayne-

    "Make sure it’s not on the same phase (service leg) as the circuits for the electronics."

    Does that mean if my lighting breaker is on the left of the panel the AV/Projector breaker should be on the right?

    ----------
    - B | B -
    - L | AV?

    or

    - B | B -
    - L | B -
    - AV| B -

    Thanks

    BTW- I ran 2 12ga cl3 speaker wires from the AV rack to the riser for Bass shakers.
     
  5. Andrew Pratt

    Andrew Pratt Producer

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    The only thing that I can see is four wall scones might not be very bright. I have 4 in my room and its still not enought light so I'll be installing some pot lights for those times that I want to use the room for entertaining etc.
     
  6. KenA

    KenA Stunt Coordinator

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    Not necessarily. My phases are broken up into every other circuit top to bottom. Once you take off the pannel, you'll see which legs are connected to which breakers.
     
  7. Ian_J

    Ian_J Stunt Coordinator

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    I have 4 wall sconces with double bulbs in each (12x18x8 room). I'm only using 25watt bulbs in each sconce and its more then enough light for the room. My walls are burgandy and my ceiling is black.

    When you hang the drywall, be sure to pull your speaker wire through so that it won't bind up behind the new drywall like mine did. Luckily, I was able to cut a small hole in the opposite side of the wall and straighten out the tangle.
     
  8. StephenHa

    StephenHa Second Unit

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    I usually recommend to my customers to run plastic conduit to where they want things to be mounted, that way when something happens or you need to upgrade wire you can attach a string (or the new wire) to the old and just pull, or use a plastic bag with a string tied to it, and a shop vac it will suck the bag through and you get your new wire
     
  9. Parker Clack

    Parker Clack Schizophrenic Man
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    I agree with Stephen to take the time to run conduit for your speaker wires, cables for your projector, etc. That way if you ever need to change these out it sure beats having to tear into the drywall to do it later.
     
  10. Ian_J

    Ian_J Stunt Coordinator

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    As far as conduit goes, I used a 2.5" flex pipe from HomeDepot. They sell it for use with pools, boats, etc.. Although it was expensive, it was much easier to use than PVC pipe.
     
  11. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    “Easier to use?” Perhaps from an installation point, since it’s definitely easy to route, but flexible tubing will probably bite you in the butt when it comes time to pull cables through it.

    There is a reason why electricians use conduit. Pulling cables is easiest when you have a straight pull. All the sags and bends in a piece of flexible tubing will increase friction and make a pull more difficult, especially if it is a long one. Not to mention the internal ridges offer multiple opportunities for snags and hang-ups unless the leading edge of your bundle is as tapered and smooth as the tip of a spike or nail. Anyone who’s ever pulled cable, especially bundles of cables, will tell you that that’s pretty tough to accomplish.

    There is also the issue with the sheer size of a 2-1/2” conduit. Dropping something that size through a header/footer or stud board will severely compromise the structural integrity of the board.

    Running conduit to “future-proof” an installation is something we see recommended here fairly often, but I’ve yet to see anyone offer any instructions on how to install conduit properly. If you don’t put it in properly, you will not be able to get any cable through when the day comes that you need to use it.

    It’s not rocket science or anything; you only need to keep in mind a few simple concepts.

    The first and foremost is, “straight is good.” The more turns and bends you have to make between points A and B, the more of a problem you have.

    Essentially, any cable pull with more than a single 90 or “elbow” is virtually impossible. Don’t think you’ll be able to pull cables through an uninterrupted conduit configured as a “u” or zig-zag.

    Even a single 90 is virtually impossible if the corner is sharp. Therefore, it’s better to put in two 45s than a single 90, unless you can use a sweeping 90 – i.e., one with a radius.

    If multiple corners are involved, there will have to be accessible junction points at each turn. “Accessible” for this purpose means an in-line box with a removable cover. This allows you to pull the cable between say, junction points A and B, and then between points B and C, and so on.

    “Accessibility” also means you will have to be able to physically access each junction box. That’s the tricky thing, since the only reason to run conduit to begin with is because access is limited. However, it should be self-evident that an in-wall or in-ceiling junction box is worthless if you can’t get to it. There will need to be some kind of access panel in the sheetrock.

    Hope this helps.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  12. Ian_J

    Ian_J Stunt Coordinator

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    Just for the record.

    The 2.5" tubing I used was smooth (no ridges) and offered little resistance. A portion of the tubing run was bent at a 45 angle (no need for a junction box). No problems pulling cable through. In fact, I pulled a set of component video cable (3/4 inch diameter), an s-video cable, and coaxial cable at the same time. Also, you can buy tubing as small as ½ inch.

    Good Luck!
     

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