labeling my CDs

Discussion in 'Music' started by Micah Cohen, May 27, 2005.

  1. Micah Cohen

    Micah Cohen Screenwriter

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    I want to stop labeling my burned CDs in my handwriting. I want to use a "thermal printer," Primera or Canon seem to be the most popular brands. Any feedback on these products, or the use of inexpensive thermal printers for labeling CDs?

    (Admin, if this thread would be better served in another forum location, please feel free to move it around. Thank you!)

    MC
     
  2. JohnRice

    JohnRice Lead Actor

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    I use an Epson R200 and inkjet printable discs. The silver ones look especially cool.
     
  3. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    Personally I'll never use anything but handwriting with my burned CDs. The top layer of a CD-R is so thin and fragile, I don't trust any thermal printing or sticker in the long term.
     
  4. Will_B

    Will_B Producer

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    I dont even write across the surface in a straight line, I hug the edge of the disc (where many recordings have no data on the reverse side from where I am writing). That's just in CASE the marker ink somehow ends up burning through.

    For DVD-Rs, I write only on the clear plastic hub.
     
  5. Micah Cohen

    Micah Cohen Screenwriter

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    Whelp, let me update you all. As usual, I blundered along heedlessly and ordered a thermal CD label printer:

    Primera Z1

    I checked out inkjet CD printers, and didn't really feel that was what I wanted. The quality didn't seem high enough for me, I was being picky. I have never seen an example of this particular thermal's handywork, but friends who get CDs duped and thermally printed showed me their discs and they look pretty professional.

    I should get the thermal printer in the middle of this upcoming week. I will play with it and report back.

    I just figured, heck, it's cheap enough that I can stop writing on my CDs and start printing on them. If it doesn't affect the burn side of the disc, then everything should work great, I'm figuring.

    I also checked out HP's Lightscribe, for which you have to buy into a whole new product category, like those coffee machines that only use coffee pods. Lightscribe is pretty cool, tho, if you want to go to the trouble.

    Stay tuned, disc printers.

    MC
     
  6. John Watson

    John Watson Screenwriter

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    Will B said "I dont even write across the surface in a straight line, I hug the edge of the disc (where many recordings have no data on the reverse side from where I am writing). That's just in CASE the marker ink somehow ends up burning through."

    I've been starting to write on the edge too, same reasoning [​IMG]
     
  7. Micah Cohen

    Micah Cohen Screenwriter

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  8. Paul_Nyman

    Paul_Nyman Second Unit

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    Little late on posting here. Buddy of mine used to use the Casio CW-50 Thermal CD/DVD printer. It worked fine with the first ribbon (average about 40-60 discs with a single line of text printed on blank media) once he replaced the ribbon it would fade out portions of the line of text randomly. Made no sense, the ribbon wasn't twisted or misaligned.

    Anyway Primo hopefully has a better product for you.

    I would be interested in hearing how it works out for you long term use. Maybe I'll buy one of these if they are worth getting.
     
  9. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    is this a "traditional" thermal printer? the kind that uses heat to create the image? if so, i don't see how that can be a good thing for labels? over time, just about every thermal printout i've seen fades or discolors?
     
  10. Micah Cohen

    Micah Cohen Screenwriter

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    Aw, man, don't say that. You're thinking of flimsy old FAX paper, right?

    Anyway, I got the printer, and it is COOL as spit, man! You design a simple label on the computer (software included), import images (like jpgs of band logos downloaded from the web), make song lists, etc., and then the little machine prints the stuff on your disc, turning the disc automatically in the machine to print on four "quadrants."

    I printed some test discs, and then did my best to scratch, ruin, wipe or fade the printing. I found that it will scratch off if you really go at it with a sharp edge. It will "liquify" and come off if you scribble over it with a thick Sharpie enough times. But it will not come off with water, nor with normal handling.

    It does not impede the quality of the burned info on the disc. (You are instructed to print on the disc FIRST, then burn your info.) And it looks darn smart and nifty, if I say so myself: professional quality printing on my own burned CDs!

    In the next week or so, I plan to print LOADS of disc labels (at least 25 or so). I will report back with info on how the thing stands up to constant use.

    YESSSSSSSSSSSSSSS!

    MC
     

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