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Kino-Lorber Insider Announcement Thread (Read Guidelines Post #3) (35 Viewers)

Stephen_J_H

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Screams of a Winter Night sounds interesting, though the PG rating makes me wonder how scary it can really be. Unless the added unrated footage adds something.
It's a 1970s PG, meaning pre PG-13 or back when the PG rating actually meant something more than "mild language and violence." A lot of the PG horrors of the 70s lean more into creep than gore, and are effective because of it.
 

Worth

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It's a 1970s PG, meaning pre PG-13 or back when the PG rating actually meant something more than "mild language and violence." A lot of the PG horrors of the 70s lean more into creep than gore, and are effective because of it.
And the differences between PG and R were often arbitrary. The Fog was rated R while Invasion of the Body Snatchers was PG, even though Body Snatchers is both gorier and has nudity.
 

Malcolm R

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Screams... is also currently available on Shudder. I'll probably check it out there before deciding whether to buy.
 

RobertMG

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My pleasure! A few years ago I became friends with Charles Fitzsimmons (Maureen O'Hara's brother) who at the time was the head of The Producer's Guild Of America (he was also acting as her agent at the time) when I was working on my first book. I got to ask him about the Hollywood legends he had known I asked him about The Duke, Gene Kelly John Ford etc and then about Fred Astaire and his answer was "He was a prince, one of the best people I have ever known" If you ever have seen interviews with Mr. Astaire he never really was comfortable with the level of respect and love people showed him he always was very humble. He appreciated peoples praise but always just thought of himself as a hoofer. Debbie Reynolds told a story where she was crying because she felt she was not learning the dance steps for Singin' In The Rain and a man walked by he was hidden though from view and he asked "why are u crying young lady?" After she told him she was depressed about her dancing and afraid things were going bad. He reached out to her - she then realized it was Astaire, he said "You have to rehearse do not give up it is hard work you can do it, come watch me rehearse." She said he was known to have only Hermes Pan and a pianist in the rehearsal hall no one else thats how private he was. She went with him - he also had a cane that day and she said he got frustrated, threw the cane for two hours and he said to her "you see how hard it is but do not give up." Astaire was one of a kind!

 

RobertMG

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Another never released title from Universal. Thanks, Kino!

THE SCREEN IN REVIEW; Howard Duff Plays a Crooked Camera Man in 'Shakedown' at Criterion Theatre​




One of the season's most thorough-going heels holds the spotlight in "Shakedown." This melodrama from Universal-International, which arrived at the Criterion on the week-end, is somewhat longer on talk than action, but there is enough of the latter to go around the eighty minutes that the film takes to unwind. Howard Duff, starred as an unprincipled newspaper photographer named Jack Early, gives such a credible performance that the contrived script is not nearly as hard to accept as otherwise might be the case. Apparently this is to be the year when newspaper people are to be represented on the screen as something less than honorable custodians of the public's trust. A little while back, in "The Underworld Story," a publisher tried to cover up a murder committed by his son by involving an innocent party. Now, in "Shakedown," we have a photographer working in cahoots with a racketeer to expose a rival in the act of a holdup. Early gets the picture—to be sure, he's a pretty ingenious fellow with a camera—but he holds back the negative clearly showing the robbers in order to blackmail them for a cut of the swag. He then double-crosses his gangster friend and sets a death trap for him because he has designs on the latter's wife. Jack Early is about as black a character as you are apt to run across and, considering gangland justice, if not the Production Code, his own doom is inevitable. But don't think the authors let down their nasty creation at the end. No indeed, for Early manages with his last spark of life to photograph his murderer. Mr. Duff is seldom off the screen in "Shakedown" and his acting never falters, even though the script frequently does. Brian Donlevy and Lawrence Tierney are convincing as the gangsters; Bruce Bennett is indecisive as the managing editor who is troubled by Early's ruthless ambition, and Peggy Dow and Anne Vernon are competent as the photo editor and gangster's wife, respectively. Aside from having an unusually vicious protagonist practicing an honorable profession, "Shakedown" is just about average as crime melodramas go.
SHAKEDOWN, screen play by Alfred Lewis Levitt and Martin Goldsmith based on a story by Nat Dallinger and Don Martin; directed by Joe Pevney; produced by Ted Richmond for Universal-International. At the Criterion. Jack Early . . . . . Howard Duff Nick Palmer . . . . . Brian Donlevy Ellen Bennett . . . . . Peggy Dow Colton . . . . . Lawrence Tierney David Glover . . . . . Bruce Bennett Nita Palmer . . . . . Anne Vernon City Editor . . . . . Stapleton Kent Roy . . . . . Peter Virgo Sam . . . . . Charles Sherlock


Gotta grab this one! Thank you KINO!
 

Kino Lorber Insider

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Coming April 5th from CODE RED and Kino Lorber!

The Violent Breed (1984)
• Brand New 2K Master
• Theatrical Trailer
• Optional English Subtitles

Color 91 Minutes 1.85:1 Rated R
Danger and adventure are the business of The Violent Breed in this explosive action thriller from the maestro Fernando Di Leo, director of Caliber 9, The Italian Connection, The Boss and Shoot First, Die Later. Stone-faced CIA boss Kirk Cooper (Henry Silva, Almost Human) gets word of a renegade American working the world’s richest drug source, the Golden Triangle. It’s a billion-dollar business with Mafia connections on one side, and a Russian arms deal on the other. And it must be stopped. He sends Vietnam vet Mike Martin (Harrison Muller, She) into the jungles of Southeast Asia to eliminate the tough-as-nails kingpin, Polo (Woody Strode, The Professionals). It’s one man against an army of cutthroats in The Violent Breed a.k.a. Real Soulja, also starring Carole André (Face to Face) and Luigina Rocchi (Slave of the Cannibal God) with a rousing score by Paolo Rustichelli (The Dirty Seven).

738329258436.jpg
 

Kino Lorber Insider

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Coming April 12th!

New Year’s Evil (1980)
• Brand New 2K Master
• Audio Commentary by Director Emmett Alston, Moderated by Code Red's Bill “Banana Man” Olsen
• The Making of New Year’s Evil: Featuring Interviews with Cinematographer Thomas Ackerman and Actors Kip Niven, Grant Cramer and Taaffe O’Connell
• Theatrical Trailer
• Newly Commissioned Art by Vince Evans
• Reversible Art
• Limited Edition O-Card Slipcase
• Optional English Subtitles

Color 85 Minutes 1.85:1 Rated R
On a totally punked-out New Year’s Eve, vivacious TV hostess Diane “Blaze” Sullivan counts down the hours to midnight. But as her show progresses, every hour, on the hour, a savage maniac slashes up a new female victim. As the trail of mutilated bodies spreads throughout the city, it becomes apparent that the psychopath’s ultimate target is Blaze herself. Desperate to stop the bloody rampage, the police frantically seal off the ongoing televised festivities. But the killer is quicker than they suspected—and he’s also the last one anyone suspects. So join the holiday season’s deadliest celebration with a New Year’s resolution to stay alive! Starring Roz Kelly (TV’s Happy Days), Kip Niven (Magnum Force), Grant Cramer (Hardbodies), Louisa Moritz (Death Race 2000), Taaffe O’Connell (Galaxy of Terror) and Teri Copley (TV’s We Got It Made), New Year’s Evil is a killer party you’ll never forget from director Emmett Alston (9 Deaths of the Ninja, Demonwarp) and producers Golan-Globus (Enter the Ninja, Runaway Train).

New Year's Evil.jpg
 

Robert Crawford

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Saturday's Facebook Announcement:

Coming Soon on Blu-ray!

Brand New 2K Master!

The Last Train From Madrid (1937)
Starring Dorothy Lamour, Lew Ayres, Gilbert Roland, Anthony Quinn, Karen Morley, Lionel Atwill, Helen Mack, Lee Bowman, Alan Ladd, Charles Middleton & Robert Cummings – Harry Fischbeck (Double Door) – Directed by James P. Hogan (The Mad Ghoul).

1642867377075.png
 

JoeDoakes

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Saturday's Facebook Announcement:

Coming Soon on Blu-ray!

Brand New 2K Master!

The Last Train From Madrid (1937)
Starring Dorothy Lamour, Lew Ayres, Gilbert Roland, Anthony Quinn, Karen Morley, Lionel Atwill, Helen Mack, Lee Bowman, Alan Ladd, Charles Middleton & Robert Cummings – Harry Fischbeck (Double Door) – Directed by James P. Hogan (The Mad Ghoul).

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Another film of which I've never heard and another remarkable cast mashup from Kino. I never would have guessed all these people were in a film together. Is this about the Spanish Civil War?
 

David Weicker

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Another film of which I've never heard and another remarkable cast mashup from Kino. I never would have guessed all these people were in a film together. Is this about the Spanish Civil War?
Maltin’s review indicates it is like Grand Hotel - several interconnected stories with people thrown together in the same space
 

Thomas T

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Another film of which I've never heard and another remarkable cast mashup from Kino. I never would have guessed all these people were in a film together. Is this about the Spanish Civil War?
This was my capsule review of it:

Set in Madrid during the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), the government is shutting down the railway line out of Madrid after the final evening train pulls out. In GRAND HOTEL style, a disparate group of characters, good and bad, rich and poor, desperately seek a spot on the train and for some it's a matter of life and death. They include an American journalist (Lew Ayres), an aristocrat (Dorothy Lamour), a deserting soldier (Robert Cummings), an Army Captain (Anthony Quinn), an escaped convict (Gilbert Roland), a Baroness (Karen Morley), a sleazy lounge lizard (Lee Bowman), a girl (Helen Mack) of ill repute and the daughter (Olympe Bradna) of an executed political prisoner. Directed by James P. Hogan, it's varied in its story lines, some are more interesting than others. Hogan manages to slowly build up the tension as you're rooting for your favorite people to make the train safely but wouldn't you know it, the one character I liked the most doesn't make it! It's a programmer and while it doesn't quite have the star line up of GRAND HOTEL or MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS, I found it quite engaging. The film features one of Anthony Quinn's rare good roles in the 1930s (he career didn't hit high gear until the 1950s) and Robert Cummings is as awful as ever. With Lionel Atwill and Henry Brandon and Alan Ladd is supposed to have a bit in here but I didn't catch him.
 

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