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Matt Hough

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Matt Hough
As grand an adventure as was ever filmed during Hollywood’s Golden Age, Compton Bennett and Andrew Marton’s King Solomon’s Mines continues to pass the test of time more than seventy years after its original production.



King Solomon's Mines (1950)



Released: 24 Nov 1950
Rated: Passed
Runtime: 103 min




Director: Compton Bennett, Andrew Marton
Genre: Action, Adventure, Romance



Cast: Deborah Kerr, Stewart Granger, Richard Carlson
Writer(s): Helen Deutsch, H. Rider Haggard



Plot: Adventurer Allan Quartermain leads an expedition into uncharted African territory in an attempt to locate an explorer who went missing during his search for the fabled diamond mines of King Solomon.



IMDB rating: 6.8
MetaScore: N/A





Disc Information...

Continue reading...
 

jayembee

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Mar 29, 2020
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Jerry
I miss the reel change markers. I've always thought of them as part of the movie-going experience. Back in the LD/DVD days, they were also very helpful in determining whether a "full screen" disc of a flat widescreen movie was full frame or cropped.
 

Douglas R

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I miss the reel change markers. I've always thought of them as part of the movie-going experience. Back in the LD/DVD days, they were also very helpful in determining whether a "full screen" disc of a flat widescreen movie was full frame or cropped.
I agree. I was so used to seeing them theatrically that I thought of them as part and parcel of the film.
 

Bartman

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Aug 5, 2017
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Trevor Bartram
I've just watched the DVD. I do not see mis-registration or other problems but the entire on location shoot is soft. However, there are some studio shots early in the film that are not soft. Therefore, softness appears to be more to do with the print than the transfer. Has anyone compared the DVD & Blu-ray & care to comment?
 

Robert Crawford

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I've just watched the DVD. I do not see mis-registration or other problems but the entire on location shoot is soft. However, there are some studio shots early in the film that are not soft. Therefore, softness appears to be more to do with the print than the transfer. Has anyone compared the DVD & Blu-ray & care to comment?
There is no reason to compare because the Blu-ray blows the DVD out of the water presentation-wise. As soon as I played the entire Blu-ray, the DVD was placed into the trash bin.
 

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