Just bought A SPL meter...

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by JerryCulp, Jul 12, 2003.

  1. JerryCulp

    JerryCulp Stunt Coordinator

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    and I learned a few things.
    1. My ears are not the best way to calibrate my speakers. using the SPL, I adjusted the speakers and the system sounds a few times better, most notably in the surrounds.
    2. I am a Bass pig. Before the SPL I had the receiver set to +4 for the sub. The SPL says -4. I now know why my ears hurt when I watched a movie at seemingly low volume levels. The bass was was way over the top, with the rest of the sound at ~80db, the bass probably way past 100db, and that was without considering peak.levels.
    3. Most importantly, I should have listened to to all the experts that said a SPL is a must have!
     
  2. joe rizzuto

    joe rizzuto Stunt Coordinator

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    it's my understanding that the sub should be set at 0 and to do adjustments at the sub itself.
    did you use a tune up dvd or the receiver's test tones?
    if not, i suggest a tune up dvd would be the ticket.
    it will help your sound as much as the spl meter did.
     
  3. Steve_AS

    Steve_AS Second Unit

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  4. Lee Carbray

    Lee Carbray Second Unit

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  5. Steve_AS

    Steve_AS Second Unit

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  6. JerryCulp

    JerryCulp Stunt Coordinator

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    It is a R-shack meter. I used the tones from receiver, an Onkyo 510 (receiver in the HT-S760).
    The freq range says it goes low enough for my current sub, 35hz.
    But my SVS 20-39 PCi is on the UPS truck and should be here tomorrow or Friday. Now that i have ssome loose idea of how much bass is about right, I hope I can set the SVS close enough with R-shack meter.
     
  7. joe rizzuto

    joe rizzuto Stunt Coordinator

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  8. JerryCulp

    JerryCulp Stunt Coordinator

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    Because I used the tones from the receiver, I had to use the adjustment on the receiver. I set the sub at 0 and used the remote to adjust. The tone doesnt play long enough for me to take a reading at the listening position and adjust the sub. Not in any amount time I want to spend doing it.
    My friend has one of teh tune up disks, and I am going to borrow it from him.
     
  9. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Lead Actor

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    To answer the pink noise question:

    Pink noise is a sum/average of all frequencies. Most test tones are made of pink noise. The Rat Shack meter correction tables list corrections for specific frequencies (i.e the meter may be -5dB at 25Hz and +2dB at 18 Hz, etc.). Since pink noise is composed of all frequencies - which correction factor are you going to use? The answer - none of them. Vince Maskeeper did a test on this effect and found the correction values really mean nothing when adjusting via pink noise. Just adjust to the proper level on the SPL meter and forget about the correction values.
     
  10. Steve_AS

    Steve_AS Second Unit

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  11. Matthew-K

    Matthew-K Stunt Coordinator

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    I thought the SPL meter was used to set all of the speakers to the same db range from the listening position? i.e. you would get the same reading from each speaker, from your listening position, if you have your speakers adjusted correctly. Is there more to the SPL meters than I thought?
     

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