Jump start my RPTV search please??

Discussion in 'Displays' started by tom milton, Jun 15, 2006.

  1. tom milton

    tom milton Agent

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    everyone probably cringes at another "tell me what to buy" question but it is SO helpful to get a short list together first, and then set out on detailed research, comparisons, etc.

    i'm replacing a 50" pioneer elite pro96 RPTV, 15 years old (!! -obviously i've been happy with it). my time frame is to have something in place by sept or so. sooner would be better, but i don't want to wait until 2007. here are my criteria:

    * 50" screen has worked well for my viewing distance (about 13-16 feet) so i'd stay with 50" at least, larger might be preferable

    * Price, prefer $3000 to $4000 range, could go higher, less would be even better

    * Use, a fair amount of cable TV, the rest DVD -- probably 70/30 split. Lots of sports

    * Decor (wait, wait, i have to consider my wife!) basic black is great, silver or fake wood trim probably out

    a front projector system is not possible in this setting due to the ambient light and configuration of the room. i thought briefly about plasma but have ruled it out. 1080p input capability sounds like it might be a good idea since it is the latest technology, but, you all tell me -- i'm open to possibilities.

    thanks in advance, very much, for the advice!
     
  2. Brian_Pete

    Brian_Pete Stunt Coordinator

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    Right off the bat I would recommend the new Samsung DLP 87 and 88 series.
    -1080p inputs (2 HDMI, 2 component)
    -Gloss black minimal frame
    -56" MSRPs $3K (can be had for less)

    This is the TV I'm getting for my basement. I have 9 feet viewing distance and I'm getting the 56". From your distance I would get the 61" but it's up to you. I'm not sure how good the picture will be with standard cable but that's not a concern of mine. If you keep it for another 15 years, I hope by then most channels will be in Hi-Def anyway.

    Check the threads at AVS forum for the 87 and 88 series. The owners really seem to like them.

    Search this forum too. I believe someone posted a review of the 56" 87 model. Samsung DLPs also come highly recommended by Greg Loewenn who is a professional calibrator on this forum.

    Hope this info helps.
     
  3. tom milton

    tom milton Agent

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    thanks, brian. the samsung sounds like it would fit the bill, and i might find one to audition at the local circuit city.

    browsing around has also brought up the HP 1080p set, but i think it is out as there is no local dealer. i've also heard about something upcoming from sony in the next couple of months.

    when i asked for a short list, i never thought it would be only 1!

    thanks again for your help.
     
  4. Adam_R

    Adam_R Second Unit

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    I agree about the Samsung 87 series.

    Great set.

    I love mine.
     
  5. MarkHarrison

    MarkHarrison Supporting Actor

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    I haven't picked up a set myself yet, but from what I've seen in my research, I have to agree with the other two. I'll most likely end up with something from the Samsung HSL line. I'm thinking the HL-S5087 (50") at this point, but need to see them in person first. Or I might go for the HL-S5687 (56").
     
  6. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    Also look at Liquid Crystal on Silicon sets - a variant on LCD rear projection that offers better blacks and avoids the "screen door" effect of LCD and the "rainbow effect" that bothers some when it comes to DLP. JVC's HD-ILA line is terrific (I have a 720p set, they now also offer 1080p sets) and Sony's SXRD 1080p sets also look terrific. (In terms of cosmetics the JVC is probably a better match for your needs. Pure black, very thin bezel on three sides, speakers and front inputs below the screen. Looks very good in my all-black entertainment center.)

    After carefully researching available technologies last year I went out make my final selection from a short list of DLP sets and ended up buying my JVC LCoS instead. (The Samsung DLPs are also very nice. I helped my nephew shop for a TV set a few weeks after I bought my JVC and he selected the 42" Samsung. After I calibrated it with Digital Video Essentials it looked about as good as my JVC. Short of putting them side by side I'm not sure I could really say that one is better than the other - but I tend to think my LCoS looks a little smoother, especially on film-sourced materials. But maybe that's just because it is the one I picked. [​IMG])

    Regards,

    Joe
     
  7. Ronald Epstein

    Ronald Epstein Founder
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    I already posted this in a similar thread, but felt that the
    information may help here as well...

    I am in the same situation where I may be looking to buy a
    new rear projection television in the next 9 months.

    Gregg Loewen, our residant ISF calibrator has always recommended
    Samsung televisions and I have been watching their series as well
    as developing technology very closely over the past few months.

    It looks like their new flagship model is about to be released and
    it features LED technology that is supposed to improve overall
    bulb life. Samsung has also done away with the infamous DLP
    colorwheel that some say results in rainbow effects across the
    display.

    I have pretty much made the decision that this is the set I
    will purchase:

    Click Here and Click Here

    Right now, this set is poised to sell just under $4k. It is my hope
    that by year's end that price will drop by several hundred.

    I look forward to anyone's opinion on this television, mainly
    because I am a novice at this stuff and perhaps I have provided
    information that maybe I need to be corrected on. On the
    other hand, if I do have my facts correct, this set looks to be
    the "crown jewel" of what is available and perhaps should be
    under heavy consideration to anyone looking for a display in
    this price range.
     
  8. tom milton

    tom milton Agent

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    very good info, everyone! thanks so much!

    that new samsung sounds great. i'm really glad that it is coming soon instead of, say, a year from now. it seems like i often end up with a long wait for the next big thing in technology.

    i met one of my wife's co-workers yesterday, and turns out that he is quite a home theater buff. he owns a JVC 70" DLP, i don't know the model, but i think he said it is 1080i rather than 1080p. he has invited me to come over and have a look which i will definitely do. he bought his set about 6 months ago after an exhaustive search that crossed state lines.

    so, my questions. all else being equal, i'd get 1080p since it is the latest technology. however, i really like the idea of a big screen, especially for sports, which would favor the 70" over the 56".

    1) would 70" be too large for my viewing distance of 13 to 15 feet, and for digital cable TV?

    2) how much, if anything, would i actually be giving up by getting 1080i instead of 1080p?

    thanks again for all of the help!
     
  9. Arthur S

    Arthur S Cinematographer

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    Hi Tom

    I have a 65 inch Toshiba CRT RPTV and if anything, I would want to go larger if I replaced my set. I watch my 65 from about 11-12 feet and the 65 is not too large.

    I think you would find a 70 inch just dandy at 13-15 feet. A 70 inch screen has 56% more screen area than a 56 inch. (No that is not a typo).

    As to 1080i vs. 1080P. If you want and can afford 1080P, that is certainly the better way to go. 70 inch 1080P is going to cost you >$5,000, possibly several thousand more this year.
     
  10. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    Tom:

    If I understand all of this stuff correctly, 1080i isn't an option in your case anyway. If you're looking at DLP or any other fixed-pixel digital flat-panel or microdisplay (LCD, LCoS, plasma) - in other words, anything except a CRT-based tube, front projector or rear projector - your choices are 720p or 1080p. These systems are inherently progressive and don't display interlaced images at all. They scale all input to their native resolution. The question then becomes does the 1080p set accept true 1080p input, which evidently some don't. As for viewing distances -

    I don't have one of those handy-dandy charts that are supposed to calculate these things for you, but I can tell you my own experience.

    I owned a 56" Toshiba Theaterwide analog (standard def) RPTV for about 10 years. When I first bought it I lived in a small condo and watched it from about 6". Seemed a little close, and you could see all the flaws in the display. Scan-lines in particular were an issue, especially when zooming widescreen material, which is why anamorphic DVD was such a huge improvement in my viewing experience.

    Higher resolution displays can be watched from much closer for a given screen size. My old Toshiba probably looked best from about 12 feet away - back far enough to conceal the flaws, still big enough to see the action and get that "more than TV" feel. My 720p JVC LCoS looks incredible at a distance of about 7 feet. So you could easily go up in size at the viewing distance you mention. And if you do, by all means go for 1080p. At your viewing distance you might not really see much of a difference in detail between a 56" 720p and a 56" 1080p, but if you go with a bigger screen the difference would stand out more sharply.

    Regards,

    Joe
     
  11. Mark Cappelletty

    Mark Cappelletty Cinematographer

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    These discussions have been really helpful. I'm in the market for a 50" TV (to replace a 1999-era 32" CRT Sony) and nearly got a Sony A10, which looks great. But for a few hundred more, the Samsung 5087 seems sharper, brighter and has 1080p capability. The TVs Ron pointed out look great, but are going to run at least $1500 more than what the 1087 is going for at places like Amazon or OneCall, or with the AVS Forum discount, TVAuthority (between $2k and $2200).
     
  12. tom milton

    tom milton Agent

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    very excellent info -- thanks so much, everyone!

    >The question then becomes does the 1080p set accept true 1080p input, which evidently some don't. <

    THAT clears up some confusion! i didn't realize that this was what the advantage of the newer sets is -- i thought it was "i" vs "p".

    so i guess the Q now is, how much is given up by not having true 1080p input?

    my wife and i made a trip to BB yesterday, and they had the 61" samsung HLS, sony 50" SXRD (?), HP 50" 1080p, and JVC HD-ILA 50". i was able to adjust all settings comparably, and view the sets with the same input although i had to do a little running back and forth as they were not all side by side.

    all were great. we agreed that, especially on lower quality images, the nod went to the samsung.

    however, i still plan on seeing the 70" JVC. after that, it may come down to price and how much the size (JVC) or improvements (new samsung) are worth to me. my friend got a real deal on the JVC 70" ($3500) but i'm not sure that it can be reproduced. i don't think i'd pay $7000 for the JVC. as thrilled as we were with the 61" samsung, and i've heard it can be had for around $2700, i'm not sure i'd pay $4000 for the 56" new samsung. but, this is all subject to change of course.

    thanks again! additional comments and suggestions are welcome!
     
  13. Ronald Epstein

    Ronald Epstein Founder
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    Tom ,

    Keep us posted. We are all in the same boat as you and
    look forward to hearing about what you purchase, and your
    overall impressions.
     
  14. Arthur S

    Arthur S Cinematographer

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    At your viewing distance, greater screen size has more impact than 1080P, especially when you factor in price.
     
  15. JoeRiley

    JoeRiley Stunt Coordinator

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    I'm glad I checked this thread out... I bookmarked the Samsung 1080p set so I don't forget about it when I replace my tv in 6 months. [​IMG]

    BTW... that samsung is TRUE 1080p right?
     

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