I've Lost My Bass!, Please Help Me Find It.

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Anthony_I, Nov 13, 2004.

  1. Anthony_I

    Anthony_I Stunt Coordinator

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    Well i moved from a town house where i had my TV room in the basement....which wasn't what i'd consider large, but it was an average sized room.

    Concrete walls on 2 sides (3 technically, but that is beside the stairs)
    anyway, my sub sounded great, amazing, if you will.
    It made my teeth rattle, my head.... just filled your head with bass. Even hit the low lows pretty damn well.

    Then we moved into an apartment.Here is a NOT DRAWN TO SCALE picture of our the place is laid out.
    [​IMG]
    What can i do to get my bass back.... im a basshead, i need it [​IMG]



    And just a shot in the dark, but what would it take to entirely soundproof a room so that if one had music at ear piercing levels, a baby could sleep soundly in the next room?

    Not saying id do that but would it be possible and how?
     
  2. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Anthony,

    The apparent loss of bass response from one room to another is a function of the size of the room. Simply put, small rooms reinforce bass due to cabin gain, while larger rooms “soak up” bass, as it were. Thus larger rooms need bigger, more powerful subs and mains with larger or more bass drivers, etc. A “larger room” includes all areas that the room opens too.
    ”Entirely soundproof?” Solid concrete construction on all sides (including the ceiling) a couple feet thick would be a move in the right direction. Not even the room-in-a-room construction that studios use is entirely soundproof.

    But it’s really not necessary – babies can be trained. In my experience, if you insist on everything in the house being dead-silent when you put the baby down, they will indeed wake up at any sound. However, I always made it a point to keep some noise happening when I put my kids down to sleep – I’d turn on the stereo or the TV or something. Trust me, they’ll fall asleep – they will because they’re tired. And they’ll be used to the noise so it won’t wake them up.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  3. Anthony_I

    Anthony_I Stunt Coordinator

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    actually its not my kid im worried about...its the neighbours [​IMG]

    Anyway, is there anything i can do to at least gain some dB in the low range, around 30Hz??

    In the song man of the year by len, at 2:10 starts a good deep baseline, in my old place you could feel this, id like to get this back in this new place if possible.
     
  4. Aaron Smithski

    Aaron Smithski Stunt Coordinator

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    Your room and it's acoustics is the issue; well, actually it's your current subwoofer placement in the room. The room and your subwoofer are not "playing nice" right now.[​IMG]

    The easiest way to improve your situation is to place your subwoofer at your current primary listening location, and then go stroll around your room and find the spot where the bass sounds best to you...that spot will become your new subwoofer location!

    That should get you most of the way there. It's possible your old setup had a few loud peaks in the response that you became accustomed to, even though it may not have been 'accurate' -- I started out in car audio, and it took awhile to learn to 'de-tune' the over-emphasized 40-50 Hz stuff I was used to!
     
  5. Anthony_I

    Anthony_I Stunt Coordinator

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    this is a car audio sub.

    Phoenix Gold Octane R12.

    And yes in the old place we were sitting against a wall, our couch is in the middle of the room now..... but it was more than just the bass being boomy..... i mean, like you could REALLY feel it, not just hear it.

    In that len song like i mentioned, when the deep bass would "rumble" you could feel it in your lungs.
    Even if i was able to hear it again in this place (all you can hear now is the sound of the cone moving when it goes that low) i dont think i will be able to achieve the same feeling i had at my old place.

    are there panels i could build or stuff i could buy to put on the walls which will help improve my bass response and that thunderous feeling i use to get it my head/chest/teeth/lungs?
     
  6. Anthony_I

    Anthony_I Stunt Coordinator

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    it seems im put between a rock and a hard place.
    my sub was built for music and parties, with lights on it and stuff so it is meant to be looked at to induce a party mood.
    I hauled this 100Lb beats onto my couch and wandered around the room while playing a song that has the bass im lookin to achieve.

    It would seem the only place to put it would be behind the couch..... right where my computer chair is.

    meaning that i would have to move my entire computer desk and what-not....AND you wouldnt see my sub.

    Is there anyway to make my space seem smaller or something??
    the sub is in a corner right now.
     
  7. Cees Alons

    Cees Alons Moderator
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    Anthony,

    Is it really necessary for your sub to be seen?

    And before you move that computer setup for good, better test that location first. Place the sub as close to it as possible and see if it *really* improves your bass experience.
    If it doesn't, you're still not there.

    I'm afraid it won't be easy to soundproof your apartment. Better get to be friends with the neighbours and their baby (as long as it lasts [​IMG] ), perhaps negotiating daily a/o weekly noise periods, or else restrain yourself severely.


    Cees
     
  8. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Nope. Unless you want to build a wall to make the room smaller. That would do it.

    Barring that, your best bet is to put the sub in a corner, and put the couch against the wall that ends at that corner. Either that or upgrade your sub.

    All this sounds really circular. You’re concerned about bothering the neighbors, yet you want to increase your bass output. The two goals aren’t terribly compatible.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  9. Anthony_I

    Anthony_I Stunt Coordinator

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    Im not concerned with bothering my neighbours.... im honestly not sure they can hear it that much, these are solid concrete walls... i was just curious about the soundproofing thing.

    Cees, i realize for the HT guys, what i have done is weird.
    But yes it is important for my sub to be seen. it was designed and built to be seen. its meant for music, and the light ring and 2 plasma bars dance to the music, its meant for a party enviroment. it hits low and looks good doing it.

    Anyway, what kind of wall would i need, i could put up a wall behind the couch dividing the room in two... i could probably also add another layer of sheetrock.... give me more details please.... dont worry about my limitations... those are mine to figure out.... just give me ideas please [​IMG]
     

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