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I've been on a Stephen King binge.

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Jack Briggs, Jan 21, 2016.

  1. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Executive Producer
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    It's actually only on Hulu and not on a broadcast or cable network, so one way or the other I don't think it'll be hitting your DVR. But more importantly, hope you enjoy the book as much as I did!
     
  2. Message #42 of 74 Dec 4, 2019
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2020
    Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
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    I'm reviving this thread as I've officially begun working my way through King's first 15 years of published novels.

    As background, the first book I ever read of King's was The Dead Zone, and that got me hooked as it combined the things I was most attuned to as a teen - sentimental/nostalgic and suspense/horror stories (and TDZ is still probably my favorite of King's novels). Even though I read a fair number of King's work in high school, I didn't really continue past that, and some of his most popular works I never read because I saw the film adaptations first and didn't necessarily feel compelled to compare them to the source material (e.g. Carrie and The Shining).

    This last month I was able to finish both Carrie and The Stand (the 1990 version). Next up will probably be Firestarter, but I'm also kind of tempted to take a break and read Dune instead. :)

    So here's what I've read (bolded) and plan to read. I also have noted which ones I first read in high school (1987-1991). Any others would have been first read within the last five years.

    Also worth noting that in high school I read King's short stories (e.g. The Night Shift and Skeleton Crew) and his Bachman Books, but they aren't listed below.

    Carrie
    Salem's Lot
    The Shining
    The Dead Zone
    (first read in high school)
    Firestarter (completed 12/2019)
    Cujo (first read in high school, but I don't remember much about it, so will probably re-read)
    The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger
    Christine
    Pet Sematary
    Cycle of the Werewolf (completed 1/2020)
    It (first read in high school)
    The Dark Tower II: The Drawing of the Three
    Misery (first read in high school)
    The Tommyknockers (first read in high school)
    The Dark Half
    The Stand (1990)
    The Dark Tower III: The Waste Lands
    Needful Things
     
  3. Mike Frezon

    Mike Frezon Moderator
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    Love having a (any) Jack Brigg's thread revived. :D
     
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  4. Tino

    Tino Executive Producer
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    Any recent update on Jack? I really miss him and his posts.
     
  5. Mike Frezon

    Mike Frezon Moderator
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    Nope.
     
  6. Tommy R

    Tommy R Screenwriter

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    Not long after The Green Mile movie came out and gave that book a read, though unfortunately I didn’t finish it. It was just SOOO much like the movie that I was getting a little bored and ended up starting other books and just never got back to it.

    11-22-63 I read several years ago and LOVED it. I own a few more than that but just haven’t gotten around to them.
     
  7. Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
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    I'm reading Firestarter right now. I picked up the Blu-ray a little while back, so will probably watch that afterward.

    I admit I can't help seeing King's anti-tech bias in many of his characterizations of the villains. Government techies especially.
     
  8. Dennis Nicholls

    Dennis Nicholls Executive Producer

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    [​IMG]
     
  9. Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
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    Just finished Firestarter. Looking at my list above, I think I'll read Cycle of the Werewolf next, but the next book coming to me from the library is the latest Star Wars Thrawn novel.
     
  10. Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
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    I finished Cycle of the Werewolf and plan to borrow Silver Bullet from the library. I tried to watch the Firestarter feature film, but it's painful on a lot of levels (mostly the acting, but also the pacing) and it's just become a slog. I'll probably finish it eventually, but it's very low on my list.
     
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  11. RobertR

    RobertR Executive Producer

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    https://twitter.com/StephenKing/status/997160718578475008
     
  12. Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
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    So I'm planning to start on The Dark Tower next (I've had the e-book for some time, but never cracked it open), in part to veer a bit from King's more typical fare that would be in Christine and Pet Sematary. But after Dark Tower I will likely read Pet Semetary, mainly because I'm curious about the recent film adaptation and never saw the one from the '80s.
     
  13. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Pardon me, but I am having trouble figuring out how to post here. My, after a few years and I am lost.

    At any rate, for what it is worth, I have read all of Mr. King's published work now. All of it. Every last bit of it. Novels, short-story collections, essays, and even a book about the Boston Red Sox. I am totally Kingified.

    Hello, all. I hope this message gets through.

    Jack Briggs
     
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  14. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer

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    I never could get through the entire Dark Tower series -- I got bored somewhere in the middle of the series. It's been so long that I would probably need to start at the beginning, and I cannot bring myself to do that.
     
  15. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    The Dark Tower series of eight books is a challenge. For me, the challenge simply is that I do not like the particular genre: a quest fantasy. I did, however, admire Stephen King's mixture of both SF and fantasy elements in the series. What I did not admire is the ending of the seventh major volume, The Dark Tower VII: The Dark Tower. I mean, Mr. King put us through a ringer there: We patiently slogged through the series only to have it end by recycling back to the beginning.

    BTW, I believe my overall favorite King novel might be 11/22/63. My least favorite? Probably Under the Done. If anyone cares, I will explain in a future post.
     
  16. Josh Steinberg

    Josh Steinberg Executive Producer
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    I’ll be contrary and say that I genuinely love the ending to The Dark Tower. It feels right to me.

    I love also that before he begins telling the final ending by first warning the reader not to read it, that they won’t like it, and saying that they’ve just had a happy ending in the pages just before it, and imploring the reader to choose happiness over knowledge.
     
  17. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Good points, Josh.
     
  18. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    More asides:

    * Stephen King has stated that his personal favorite among his novels is Lisey's Story. Well, I read it twice, and while a provocative portrait of a marriage, it isn't quite up there for me. I like, for instance, Duma Key much more.

    * Gerald's Game was a disappointment, and Rose Madder could have been so much better. (Mr. King agreed, saying of Rose Madder that he was "trying too hard").

    * Mr. King's most recent novel, The Institute, is good, though not great. The one previous to it is, The Outsider, was better.

    * The Ralph Hodges trilogy -- Mr. Mercedes, Finders Keepers, and End of Watch -- was not truly a series of detective novels; there was, in fact, something of a supernatural element in those books.

    * The novel that put Stephen King on the map, Carrie, I think is classifiable as a science-fiction story. Seriously.

    * Of the Bachman books, my favorite is The Long Walk.
     
  19. Walter Kittel

    Walter Kittel Lead Actor

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    Carrie in the SF genre. Certainly. I feel comfortable placing novels that explore mental abilities in the SF genre. Perhaps it is a sub-genre in the case of Carrie due to King's identification with the horror genre.

    A couple of classic SF works that deal with this concept are Alfred Bester's seminal novel The Demolished Man and Jerome Bixby's entry in the SF Hall of Fame (as selected by the Science Fiction Writers of America) It's A Good Life.


    I used to read quite a bit of King, but lost my way many many years ago. Jack - Do you have a particular favorite or group of favorites from Mr. King?

    - Walter.
     
  20. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Walter, good to see you, bro'.

    As I said, I'd put 11/22/63 at the top of my list o' King faves, along with Duma Key, Christine, The Dead Zone, Misery, Salem's Lot, The Tommyknockers (I know, I know), and Pet Semetary.

    But let me put it this way: There are no King novels for which I have a disliking -- some simply are better than others, while others still fare less well. The Dragon's Eye, for example: I know what King was trying to do, and the result was interesting. But I did not love the book.

    Same with Under the Dome. To me, the novel bordered on the formulaic, King's characters being more caricatures, while the panoply of the story played out kind of predictably. (That novel, too, would be science fiction.)
     
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